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  #51  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:09 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
WAG: I suspect that as an electrical wiring professional, he prefers that the term "socket" be reserved for receptacles for actual loads (such as light bulbs) rather than shared with outlets for power cords.

ETA: The above is intended as a response to Vinyl Turnip's query.
Yeah, it's no big deal, just a personal nerve tic. Sockets are for light fixtures, receptacles or 'outlets' are for walls.
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  #52  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:16 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Originally Posted by ivylass View Post
Should he have identified himself as US Navy Captain? I know the ranks don't equal up (Navy Captain = Army Colonel) so I wonder how they keep the distinctions straight and give the proper respect across the services.
He shouldn't have to. Even if a warrant officer has more years and experience than a junior officer, he must still respect the rank.
  #53  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:21 AM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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Originally Posted by Ají de Gallina View Post
I'm not mad it's always a red-tailed hawk. I'm mad every freaking time they show an eagle, hawk, or falcon, they screech.
Most digital cameras, apparently still make the sound of a film camera with an autowinder.
I think that is because some jurisdictions require it because of the rash of upskirt and downblouse pics so that it would be impossible to quietly take those pics.
  #54  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:29 AM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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And because people like to get feedback from their devices. Without that sound, you'd get a lot of people complaining "I pushed the button, and nothing happened!".
  #55  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:59 AM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Originally Posted by gigi View Post
When East Coast highways are referred to as "The ##".
I guess all the writers live in L.A.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ají de Gallina View Post
Most digital cameras, apparently still make the sound of a film camera with an autowinder.
Digital SLRs still have mechanical shutters and mirror mechanisms. No more film advance but there is still plenty of audible noise, especially when there are dozens of them in a press conference situation.
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  #56  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:18 AM
Karen_X2 Karen_X2 is offline
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Bullets that spark after striking the street. Or wood. Or concrete.

Shooting a revolver without earplugs, then having a normal conversation with the person next to you. The ringing in your ears doesn't stop that quickly.
  #57  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:35 AM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
The thing that really bugs me is that dreadful "day for night" effect, where they shoot the scene in daylight with a blue filter to simulate nighttime. Even in the hands of a skilled director, it always looks bad -- in the night scenes of Mad Max: Fury Road, the characters were CASTING SHADOWS, fer Cripes' sake!
I mostly agree with you, but a near full moon will cast shadows on a clear night.
  #58  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:46 AM
eschereal eschereal is online now
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Originally Posted by Flyer View Post
The idea that a beret is useful or practical in any sense whatsoever is utterly laughable.
A few years ago (dozens) I combed my hair one morning as I had all my life, looked in the mirror and noticed for the first time that my hairstyle was actually a comb-over. So I said "fuck it" and redirected everything off the back. Much easier to maintain, although it left an expansive, expanding naked area on the top.

In Wyoming in July, a beret is good for protecting that spot if I go outside midday for more than an hour. In Wisconsin in February, the beret helps reduce the radiant heat loss that that exposed flesh is so good at. And in states that do not start with "W", it rolls up into a nice, compact thing that can fit in a jacket pocket.

Granted, it does not keep the rain off my glasses, but on the other hand, it takes a whole lot more wind to remove it from my head that most other hats can cling against. Even my fez leaps away before my beret does. So, yeah, a beret can indeed be useful and practical.
  #59  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:50 AM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Hmmm...so in my golden years I will either have to pretend to be an EX Green Barret or convert to Judaism?

Not sure I can pull of the former...but sure as hell not giving up ham...

Last edited by billfish678; 03-01-2016 at 11:51 AM.
  #60  
Old 03-01-2016, 12:37 PM
Ají de Gallina Ají de Gallina is offline
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Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
I think that is because some jurisdictions require it because of the rash of upskirt and downblouse pics so that it would be impossible to quietly take those pics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookingWithGas View Post
Digital SLRs still have mechanical shutters and mirror mechanisms. No more film advance but there is still plenty of audible noise, especially when there are dozens of them in a press conference situation.
I meant to say "in movies", with the sound added in post-production.
There is still noise from DLSRs but there's no autowinder noise.
  #61  
Old 03-01-2016, 12:45 PM
ZPG Zealot ZPG Zealot is online now
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Originally Posted by Flyer View Post
I thought that's what they more or less were.

The idea that a beret is useful or practical in any sense whatsoever is utterly laughable.
It keeps your head warm on a cold day and looks better (and more professional) than a ski cap How is that not useful or practical?
  #62  
Old 03-01-2016, 01:01 PM
Poysyn Poysyn is online now
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Originally Posted by dropzone View Post
Yeah, that looks dorky, regardless the branch.

Um, except in the case of the Canadian military! Then it's sexy and tough and not the least bit stupid looking!
That's RIGHT!!

  #63  
Old 03-01-2016, 01:02 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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It's and its.

Their, they're and there.

It's "Chief Justice of the United States."

It's "the Court of St. James's."

And you can't be more or less unique - no modifiers. You're unique, or you're not.
  #64  
Old 03-01-2016, 01:24 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Squealing tire noises when cars accelerate on a gravel surface.
  #65  
Old 03-01-2016, 01:44 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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The keyboard that I downloaded onto my phone makes typewriter noises when I press the keys.
  #66  
Old 03-01-2016, 02:06 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
It's "the Court of St. James's."
Wow! A double possessive?!? I've never heard this!*

The logical question is, "The court of St. James's what?"

*I'm not puzzled by the -'s, just that it's used in combination with of.
  #67  
Old 03-01-2016, 02:15 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by ivylass View Post
Should he have identified himself as US Navy Captain? I know the ranks don't equal up (Navy Captain = Army Colonel) so I wonder how they keep the distinctions straight and give the proper respect across the services.
That would have helped, I think. But such insubordination is bound to bring some wrath down upon your head in any case.
  #68  
Old 03-01-2016, 03:31 PM
Abner Ravenwood Abner Ravenwood is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Yeah, it's no big deal, just a personal nerve tic. Sockets are for light fixtures, receptacles or 'outlets' are for walls.
Is it okay to call the outlets holes?
  #69  
Old 03-01-2016, 03:59 PM
Chihuahua Chihuahua is offline
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Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
The thing that really bugs me is that dreadful "day for night" effect, where they shoot the scene in daylight with a blue filter to simulate nighttime. Even in the hands of a skilled director, it always looks bad -- in the night scenes of Mad Max: Fury Road, the characters were CASTING SHADOWS, fer Cripes' sake!
It is completely possible for the moon to cast shadows at night. I have been in places, under a clear sky with a full moon, where the nighttime really did have that kind of blue look. The problem is most people are always near a light source so they never let their eyes adjust to the point where they can see the difference.

As for the uniforms, there's a few things that piss me off:

1. TV characters who wear the Mandarin collar in the raised position.
2. The guy on "Helix" who wears his uniform with a popped collar.
3. People who have no idea how a firearm operates, and clearly do the wrong thing (like first episode of "Walking Dead," where the actor thought the slide release was the safety).

FWIW, I think a properly shaped beret can look great, as does the new ASU. Of course, I also think the Napoleonic Wars represented the height of uniform perfection, so you should probably take it with a grain of salt.
  #70  
Old 03-01-2016, 04:04 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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Mispronunciations of any word. In this Internet Age, it is totally inexcusable.

Criminal Mind's resident genius Spencer Reid pronounced Samhain "Sam-han." Google it, you idiot, and find out it's correctly pronounced Sow-een.
  #71  
Old 03-01-2016, 04:43 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Mispronunciations of any word. In this Internet Age, it is totally inexcusable. . . .
Totally disagree. There are alternative pronunciations for many, many words in the English language, as well as goofy regionalisms. (e.g., the citizenry of the town of Monticello, in Utah, are viciously adamant that the pronunciation is "Monti-SELL-oh." Do it wrong, and you will get snapped at with astonishing vituperation.)
  #72  
Old 03-01-2016, 04:47 PM
Flyer Flyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
I think that is because some jurisdictions require it because of the rash of upskirt and downblouse pics so that it would be impossible to quietly take those pics.
Nice guess, but that's not it. A lot of cameras (at least low-to-medium end) have a "discreet" mode where the camera is totally silent.
  #73  
Old 03-01-2016, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Mispronunciations of any word. In this Internet Age, it is totally inexcusable.

Criminal Mind's resident genius Spencer Reid pronounced Samhain "Sam-han." Google it, you idiot, and find out it's correctly pronounced Sow-een.
He has a didactic memory for print, not sound!
  #74  
Old 03-01-2016, 05:55 PM
eschereal eschereal is online now
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Hmmm...so in my golden years I will either have to pretend to be an EX Green Barret or convert to Judaism?

Not sure I can pull of the former...but sure as hell not giving up ham...
You could be a Parisian beatnique. If you can muster the gaul.
  #75  
Old 03-01-2016, 06:03 PM
Ají de Gallina Ají de Gallina is offline
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On TV/Movies
- People who are supposed to intlligent and knowledgeable saying their IQs, like in Scorpion, like it was printed in their foreheads by a deity and it's unchangeable and magical.
- Blinking (and bleeping) screens/letters to show that a computer has finished an activity.
- Lack of mouse/track use.
- Not knowing how manual shifting works.
- Getting second language actors to play deep-in-the-middle-of-nowhere native speakers
  #76  
Old 03-01-2016, 06:57 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Quote:
Quoth Elendil's Heir:

And you can't be more or less unique - no modifiers. You're unique, or you're not.
What use is an adjective that applies equally to every single macroscopic object in the entire Universe? "Unique" is only useful as a comparative, like "big" or "fast".
  #77  
Old 03-01-2016, 07:01 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
It's and its.

Their, they're and there.

It's "Chief Justice of the United States."

It's "the Court of St. James's."

And you can't be more or less unique - no modifiers. You're unique, or you're not.
On the same note it's attorneys-general, not attorney-generals. Lets not get started on crap like "PIN number" or "ATM machine".
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  #78  
Old 03-01-2016, 07:06 PM
running coach running coach is online now
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
Totally disagree. There are alternative pronunciations for many, many words in the English language, as well as goofy regionalisms. (e.g., the citizenry of the town of Monticello, in Utah, are viciously adamant that the pronunciation is "Monti-SELL-oh." Do it wrong, and you will get snapped at with astonishing vituperation.)
Same in Frisco.
  #79  
Old 03-01-2016, 07:08 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Cooking: "saute" does not mean to gently cook vegetables on low temperature. That's called "sweating". Saute means to fry something quickly in fat.
And etymologically speaking, saute means "to jump or skip," so if you're not jerking your wrist upwards and making the food jump in the air, it's cheating. Or if you're uncoordinated like me, at least giving a vigorous stir.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ají de Gallina View Post
I'm not mad it's always a red-tailed hawk. I'm mad every freaking time they show an eagle, hawk, or falcon, they screech.
Most digital cameras, apparently still make the sound of a film camera with an autowinder.
The coconut effect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
When East Coast highways are referred to as "The ##".
It's not just the east coast. The northern 2/3 of California does not use "the." It's a function of movies being made in Hollywood.
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Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Mispronunciations of any word. In this Internet Age, it is totally inexcusable.
In media, or in general? I hate when someone has the wherewithal to look up an easy to Google thing, but asks for the definition etc. Like the Samhain Wikipedia article uses both IPA and phonetic, but if it only had the former I'd understand a screw up, but not if you ask me what the capital of Ethiopia is when you're in front of a computer.
  #80  
Old 03-01-2016, 09:10 PM
j666 j666 is offline
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Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
The keyboard that I downloaded onto my phone makes typewriter noises when I press the keys.
That's cute.
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
What use is an adjective that applies equally to every single macroscopic object in the entire Universe? "Unique" is only useful as a comparative, like "big" or "fast".
Big and fast are not comparative, and no, something cannot be partially unique; unique is an absolute.
  #81  
Old 03-01-2016, 09:14 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
Whenever I read someone is an alum, I wonder how he could be an aluminum potassium sulfate. Might he be used in pickles?

Finishing the word with -nus (or -na for a female) really wouldn't be that hard.
But it is hard, actually. You'd have to remember to use the right gender, and then there's the problem of mixed groups. The Latin plurals are difficult as well, because the -i and ae suffixes sound the same in different systems of Latin pronunciation. You could probably say "alumnas" for the female plural, but "alumnuses" for the males sounds awkward IMHO.

As for being used in pickles, I never did consider that career possibility.
  #82  
Old 03-01-2016, 09:54 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Quote:
Quoth j666:


Big and fast are not comparative, and no, something cannot be partially unique; unique is an absolute.
Of course big and fast are comparative. Is ten miles big? Yes if that's the size of a single building, no if it's the size of an entire country. And if "unique" is an absolute, then I challenge you to provide me a single example of something that isn't unique.
  #83  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:35 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by j666 View Post
. . . Big and fast are not comparative, and no, something cannot be partially unique; unique is an absolute.
But something can be "nearly unique," so some modifiers are permitted.
  #84  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:36 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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. . . I challenge you to provide me a single example of something that isn't unique.
Electrons.
  #85  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:14 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Originally Posted by Flyer View Post
Nice guess, but that's not it. A lot of cameras (at least low-to-medium end) have a "discreet" mode where the camera is totally silent.
Maybe point-and-shoot cameras, but not SLRs, which is what professional photojournalists use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by j666 View Post
...something cannot be partially unique; unique is an absolute.
Unique is only an absolute written down on a dusty piece of paper somewhere, not in the way people really talk. And the way people really talk is all that really matters.

Three of us on my street have the same car--same year, make, model, and red color. Another guy is the only one with a blue one so it's unique. But my other friend that has a different model so it's even more unique. And the RV parked down the street is the most unique of all.

-- A recovering prescriptivist
  #86  
Old 03-02-2016, 12:29 AM
Critical1 Critical1 is offline
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Delta God Damned V

Every space movie ever effing made (or at least a hell of a lot of them) Tv shows, it doesn't really matter, They all make the same mistake with this. Burn hard and late instead of early and soft. Any Pilot of any kind of craft would know the importance of this and know it well.
  #87  
Old 03-02-2016, 12:45 AM
eschereal eschereal is online now
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Well, Star Trek was absolutely riddled with scientific errors. One that made my jaw drop when I heard it was in an episode of the original series, Court Martial, when they turned up all the audio on the ship so that they could hear everyone's heartbeat: "When I flip this switch, all the sounds on the ship will be amplified by a factor of one to the fourth power". Yeah, ok.

Then there was some Next Generation episode where the captain, or perhaps it was Riker, ordered the ship to go into a stationary orbit over the south pole (of this here moon). Umm, what? Perhaps he said "stationery" orbit? Because it sounded ok on paper?

No, really, it is kind of terrifying: if you want to watch a show that has really good science in it, stick with Futurama. At least Groening gets it right.
  #88  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:23 AM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Well, Star Trek was absolutely riddled with scientific errors. One that made my jaw drop when I heard it was in an episode of the original series, Court Martial, when they turned up all the audio on the ship so that they could hear everyone's heartbeat: "When I flip this switch, all the sounds on the ship will be amplified by a factor of one to the fourth power". Yeah, ok.

Then there was some Next Generation episode where the captain, or perhaps it was Riker, ordered the ship to go into a stationary orbit over the south pole (of this here moon). Umm, what? Perhaps he said "stationery" orbit? Because it sounded ok on paper?
I'm sure that there's some fanwank about how those totally make sense. Star Wars fans try to explain how Han's usage of "parsec" as a measure of time totally makes sense, and Star Trek fans are more into overexplaining.
Quote:
No, really, it is kind of terrifying: if you want to watch a show that has really good science in it, stick with Futurama. At least Groening gets it right.
Probably David X. Cohen with his physics and CS training, or some of the other writers have a bigger influence on the science.
  #89  
Old 03-02-2016, 05:13 AM
Max Windshoeffel Max Windshoeffel is offline
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Wow! A double possessive?!? I've never heard this!*

The logical question is, "The court of St. James's what?"

*I'm not puzzled by the -'s, just that it's used in combination with of.
The Court of St.James's Palace.
  #90  
Old 03-02-2016, 08:01 AM
chaika chaika is offline
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I see frequent errors WRT Russian naming conventions in non-Russian movies and books. Patronymics and last names are often confused or treated as interchangeable. In addition, male characters are sometimes given female names and vice versa. I once read a Cold War-era spy thriller with a male character who had been given a woman's name. I don't remember the actual name but it was something like Petrova instead of Petrov. Also, the first name + patronymic combination is the formal way to address someone. It always tickles me when non-Russian writers use that style of address between people who would be on familiar terms.

Pronunciation is a big issue in movies. It really grates to hear someone who is supposed to be a native speaker of Russian put the stress on the wrong syllable of his own name. And don't get me started on the use of language that sounds as though it has been produced by Google Translate.
  #91  
Old 03-02-2016, 08:16 AM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
"When I flip this switch, all the sounds on the ship will be amplified by a factor of one to the fourth power".
Snerk. "Aye Sir! So... uh... amplified by a factor of... one. Check!"
  #92  
Old 03-02-2016, 08:22 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by gigi View Post
He has a didactic memory for print, not sound!
Eidetic. Please slap your spellchecker for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaika View Post
Pronunciation is a big issue in movies. It really grates to hear someone who is supposed to be a native speaker of Russian put the stress on the wrong syllable of his own name. And don't get me started on the use of language that sounds as though it has been produced by Google Translate.
Broth... wait... uh... sibling!

Last edited by Nava; 03-02-2016 at 08:26 AM.
  #93  
Old 03-02-2016, 08:50 AM
GESancMan GESancMan is offline
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And don't get me started on the use of language that sounds as though it has been produced by Google Translate.
Not a movie, but this happened with Breaking Bad. There are scenes in the fourth season that take place at the cartel boss's house, where everyone is speaking Spanish. Now, I don't know the language well. I took a couple of years in high school, and I spent most of my life in California. I ran a restaurant, employing many Hispanics that I had to communicate with. When I watched those scenes on BB, something seemed off with the way they were talking. I looked it up later, and found that none of the actors were native speakers, and some of them didn't even know the language!
  #94  
Old 03-02-2016, 09:03 AM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Well, Star Trek was absolutely riddled with scientific errors. One that made my jaw drop when I heard it was in an episode of the original series, Court Martial, when they turned up all the audio on the ship so that they could hear everyone's heartbeat: "When I flip this switch, all the sounds on the ship will be amplified by a factor of one to the fourth power". Yeah, ok.
The amplification factor of 1 isn't actually the worst part of that. It's that every sound should be amplified, not just heartbeats. Assuming the bridge mics are turned off (so you don't get this fatally loud feedback loop of sound) you still should be able to hear every sound the ship makes, every pump, every fan, plus of course any other sound Finney is making. Like footsteps. Breathing. Digestive sounds!


Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Then there was some Next Generation episode where the captain, or perhaps it was Riker, ordered the ship to go into a stationary orbit over the south pole (of this here moon). Umm, what? Perhaps he said "stationery" orbit? Because it sounded ok on paper?
Ok, I'm a fanwanker. But I don't think they use "orbit" the same way we do. I think by the 23rd century it has the same relation to the original meaning as "dialing" does to phone calls. I think a "standard orbit" actually means powered hovering over the point of interest. That's why losing power (as in Court Martial) means the ship spirals down rather than just continuing to orbit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
No, really, it is kind of terrifying: if you want to watch a show that has really good science in it, stick with Futurama. At least Groening gets it right.
I hope you're going for a whoosh here. Otherwise you're delusional.

Futurama is the world where disembodied heads live in fluid filled jars and speak. Heads of people that were dead and turned to dust centuries before the technology became available. It's the world where Bender's body is larger on the inside than the outside. It's the land where a dog can die lying down on a street in NYC (and probably picked up by the garbage trucks) but yet ends up encased in dolemite in a standing position. It's the world where being your own grandpa causes you to not have the delta brainwave (whatever that is). It's the world where finglongeres exist. Where paraboxes are possible. Where aliens watch American TV shows and go to war over it. Where Zoidberg can get a job as a doctor.

I think it would be easier to list the moments of good science. Other than the answer to the question "how many atmospheres of pressure can the ship take?" I can't think of a one.

Last edited by Just Asking Questions; 03-02-2016 at 09:03 AM.
  #95  
Old 03-02-2016, 09:33 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.
Well, I've heard someone definitely in the construction game refer to the event as 'a pour', multiple times.

They weren't a fancy nitpicking engineer type, so maybe the people with clean white hardhats do actually say 'place', but at least the grunts talk about 'a pour'.
  #96  
Old 03-02-2016, 09:59 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by Max Windshoeffel View Post
Aha! Ignorance fought!
  #97  
Old 03-02-2016, 10:41 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
On the same note it's attorneys-general, not attorney-generals. Lets not get started on crap like "PIN number" or "ATM machine".
How about "courts-martial" and not "court-martials"?
  #98  
Old 03-02-2016, 10:56 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by chaika View Post
Also, the first name + patronymic combination is the formal way to address someone. It always tickles me when non-Russian writers use that style of address between people who would be on familiar terms.
I find it grating when the Russians in Tom Clancy's books regularly Russify foreigners' names. In more than 40 years of dealing with the Russian language, I have never encountered a native speaker who would do this. Jack Ryan would be "Jack" or "John," not "Ivan Emmetovich."

I have heard some howlers from professional interpreters, though. Like Carter's man who expessed the president's "great lust for the Polish people," or Brezhnev's, who told official Washington "I will not say 'good-bye,' but rather 'good-bye.'"*

*The correct translation would have been "not 'good-bye,' but 'au revoir.'"
  #99  
Old 03-02-2016, 12:25 PM
doreen doreen is online now
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Originally Posted by CookingWithGas View Post
Unique is only an absolute written down on a dusty piece of paper somewhere, not in the way people really talk. And the way people really talk is all that really matters.

Three of us on my street have the same car--same year, make, model, and red color. Another guy is the only one with a blue one so it's unique. But my other friend that has a different model so it's even more unique. And the RV parked down the street is the most unique of all.

-- A recovering prescriptivist
Nope, if there's only one of each they are equally unique among the cars on your block. And most likely none of them are unique without restriction- other people in the world have identical blue cars or the same make/model/color/year as the "different model" car or the RV. Anything mass-produced is not going to be unique without being restricted in some way. "Unique" doesn't mean exactly the same thing as "different" or "distinctive".

Last edited by doreen; 03-02-2016 at 12:25 PM.
  #100  
Old 03-02-2016, 12:45 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
Eidetic. Please slap your spellchecker for me.
I'll slap myself: I didn't second-guess myself like I always should!
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