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  #101  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:00 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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And most likely none of them are unique without restriction- other people in the world have identical blue cars or the same make/model/color/year as the "different model" car or the RV.
And how much restriction you need for them to be unique does in fact mean that some are more unique than others.
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  #102  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:02 PM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
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Anytime there's a story (online or not!) about someone whose name ends in -ski or -sky, the chances are 50/50 the name will, at some point, be spelled -ksi or -ksy.
  #103  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:59 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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I think it would be easier to list the moments of good science. Other than the answer to the question "how many atmospheres of pressure can the ship take?" I can't think of a one.
Scientific literacy showed up in odd places in Futurama. Omicron Persei (the planet whose inhabitants attack Earth when a 1,000 year old broadcast is interrupted) is approximately 1,000 light years from Earth. Bender's and Flexo's serial numbers are both the sum of two cubes. And there's one where Professor Farnsworth invents the machine that can switch two people's minds, but not switch them directly back; the theorem that proves that switching back is possible with no more than two additional people is (from what I've read) accurate.
  #104  
Old 03-02-2016, 02:32 PM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is online now
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In the Italian Job (2003 version with Mark Wahlberg), the protagonists are pursued by a couple of security guards riding BMW R1150RT motorcycles. These have 2-cylinder boxer engines, yet the sound they make in the movie is that of an inline 4-cylinder sportbike.

Maybe wrong to call this a mistake; I have no doubt it was a deliberate choice to appeal to the target audience, who generally don't care what a BMW boxer engine sounds like.
  #105  
Old 03-02-2016, 03:20 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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Originally Posted by Beware of Doug View Post
Anytime there's a story (online or not!) about someone whose name ends in -ski or -sky, the chances are 50/50 the name will, at some point, be spelled -ksi or -ksy.
Ha! In the tv series "Space: 1999," Martin Landau plays Commander John Koenig. In one ep, there is a locker or something labeled with his name, spelled "Keonig."
  #106  
Old 03-02-2016, 03:28 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by Critical1 View Post
Delta God Damned V

Every space movie ever effing made (or at least a hell of a lot of them) Tv shows, it doesn't really matter, They all make the same mistake with this. Burn hard and late instead of early and soft. Any Pilot of any kind of craft would know the importance of this and know it well.
It could work that way in a combat maneuver, as in an assault shuttle approaching a space station with intent to board by force. Coming in really fast, and then decelerating as sharply as possible at the last minute is the best way to shorten the overall time of the transit, thus giving the enemy the least amount of time to prepare.

In ordinary navigation, you're very right. Course-correction burns should always be calculated to the minimum, and that does mean small corrections early rather than bigger ones later.
  #107  
Old 03-02-2016, 04:01 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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In media, or in general? I hate when someone has the wherewithal to look up an easy to Google thing, but asks for the definition etc. Like the Samhain Wikipedia article uses both IPA and phonetic, but if it only had the former I'd understand a screw up, but not if you ask me what the capital of Ethiopia is when you're in front of a computer.
In general. I will never forget a character on 21 Jump St saying "I grew up in mun-auch-ee, New Jersey." How did you grow up there and not learn it is pronounced MOON-auck-ee? Couldn't someone on the show call the borough hall and get the correct pronounciation.
  #108  
Old 03-02-2016, 04:16 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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In general. I will never forget a character on 21 Jump St saying "I grew up in mun-auch-ee, New Jersey." How did you grow up there and not learn it is pronounced MOON-auck-ee? Couldn't someone on the show call the borough hall and get the correct pronounciation.
"Hello, is this the bore-ohg hall?"
  #109  
Old 03-02-2016, 04:26 PM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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The doctor was taking tumor out of my brain last year. He accidentally removed a little too much and gave me a psychosis. Little errors like that just drive me insane.
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  #110  
Old 03-02-2016, 04:42 PM
desertmonk desertmonk is offline
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The doctor was taking tumor out of my brain last year. He accidentally removed a little too much and gave me a psychosis. Little errors like that just drive me insane.
But how do you feel about the scientific accuracy of Futurama?
  #111  
Old 03-02-2016, 04:56 PM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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Speaking of bad pronounciating, it bugs me when someone gets introduced as "here is Dr. Heincles" and he says it "hine culs", and then someone responds "glad to meet you, Dr Hen clees". Obviously there was no pronunciation guide with the script, and each actor just read it their own way. This is usually in sci-fi shows with their weird alien names.

Real people would actually hear the name, and get the same pronunciation. But, even so, you'd think in the first rehearsal they'd get on the same page, but nope. I've seen this in finished episodes.

Last edited by Just Asking Questions; 03-02-2016 at 04:58 PM.
  #112  
Old 03-02-2016, 05:03 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
Speaking of bad pronounciating, it bugs me when someone gets introduced as "here is Dr. Heincles" and he says it "hine culs", and then someone responds "glad to meet you, Dr Hen clees". . . .
Obviously, this is a production blunder...but it's fun to point out that I've seen this happen fairly often in real life. Some people have trouble pronouncing certain words, and can't even successfully echo what they've just heard.

I have a friend who absolutely cannot pronounce "Ysidro" correctly. He always says "Isidero" instead of "Ee-see-dro."

But, hell no, I'd never put that kind of business in a serious script. (It could work in a comedy!)
  #113  
Old 03-02-2016, 05:15 PM
SCAdian SCAdian is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
And how much restriction you need for them to be unique does in fact mean that some are more unique than others.
Not at all. It simply means that they are unique in different ways, or amongst different groups.
  #114  
Old 03-02-2016, 05:18 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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Is there anything worse than when a miscreant flaunts the law?
  #115  
Old 03-02-2016, 05:42 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Originally Posted by Earl Snake-Hips Tucker View Post
Ha! In the tv series "Space: 1999," Martin Landau plays Commander John Koenig. In one ep, there is a locker or something labeled with his name, spelled "Keonig."
Space:1999's premise is that the moon is hurtling through space because of an atomic explosion, so anything else after that is not worth kvetching about.
  #116  
Old 03-02-2016, 05:55 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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Is there anything worse than when a miscreant flaunts the law?
If you've got it, flout it.
  #117  
Old 03-02-2016, 06:09 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Is there anything worse than when a miscreant flaunts the law?
You need to reign in your objections.
  #118  
Old 03-02-2016, 08:10 PM
Rick Rick is offline
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Electrical: calling a receptacle a "wall socket". I know it's just trade ignorance, but it bugs me.

For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.

Cooking: "saute" does not mean to gently cook vegetables on low temperature. That's called "sweating". Saute means to fry something quickly in fat.
Sorry, but I have to nitpick your nitpick. My father who for 40 years after WWII was in charge of building some very large very famous concrete buildings here in Southern California always said pour. As in we are pouring on Friday, so I will be home late.
  #119  
Old 03-02-2016, 11:44 PM
Wallaby Wallaby is offline
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I really love a good space show - drama, comedy, whatever.

And generally, I don't get too fussed about the 'science'. Hey, they're aliens! Maybe their technology is better than our's - so they can travel faster than light, or generate artificial gravity, or propagate sound through a vacuum - that's fine. Ditto for earth-based technology of the future - it's all going to be invented tomorrow! (And before you bring up ID4, just assume the aliens used a software that accepted all operating systems. Still should have used a password, though).

But, when space movies or TV shows are set today, using today's technology, for some reason I get really pernickety about the slightest errors and absurdities, and will rant, yell and eventually throw the remote at the TV in exasperation.

(Why, yes, I did get around to watching Gravity recently - why do you ask?).
  #120  
Old 03-03-2016, 04:27 AM
beowulff beowulff is offline
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In “Primer,” there is a scene where someone is soldering a circuit board - by dripping solder on the joints!

I mean - come on - couldn’t they even find one person who knew how to solder for that scene? It took me right out of the movie.
  #121  
Old 03-03-2016, 04:34 AM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
Speaking of bad pronounciating, it bugs me when someone gets introduced as "here is Dr. Heincles" and he says it "hine culs", and then someone responds "glad to meet you, Dr Hen clees". Obviously there was no pronunciation guide with the script, and each actor just read it their own way. This is usually in sci-fi shows with their weird alien names.
I generally see it more with regular names with multiple pronunciations. (Ahn-dray-ah vs An-dree-ah vs Ahn-dree-ah, for Andrea, frex.) It does drive me nuts. Especially because the victims never get tired of having their names constantly mispronounced at them and correct people.
  #122  
Old 03-03-2016, 07:33 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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I understand it's an easy typo to make, but there's a big difference between inpatient and impatient.
  #123  
Old 03-03-2016, 08:25 AM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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But how do you feel about the scientific accuracy of Futurama?
It's all right on target, as far as I'm concerned.
  #124  
Old 03-03-2016, 08:30 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is online now
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It's all right on target, as far as I'm concerned.
  #125  
Old 03-03-2016, 08:51 AM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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All hail Hypno-Toad.
  #126  
Old 03-03-2016, 10:10 AM
gigi gigi is offline
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You need to reign in your objections.
And hone in on what the real problem is.
  #127  
Old 03-03-2016, 10:19 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by Beware of Doug View Post
Anytime there's a story (online or not!) about someone whose name ends in -ski or -sky, the chances are 50/50 the name will, at some point, be spelled -ksi or -ksy.
There's a character in the Ring of Fire series whose name is probably Magda. Probably, I say, because it gets spelled Madga half the freaking time.
  #128  
Old 03-03-2016, 12:38 PM
Abner Ravenwood Abner Ravenwood is offline
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Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
Speaking of bad pronounciating, it bugs me when someone gets introduced as "here is Dr. Heincles" and he says it "hine culs", and then someone responds "glad to meet you, Dr Hen clees". Obviously there was no pronunciation guide with the script, and each actor just read it their own way. This is usually in sci-fi shows with their weird alien names.

Real people would actually hear the name, and get the same pronunciation. But, even so, you'd think in the first rehearsal they'd get on the same page, but nope. I've seen this in finished episodes.
My last name gets mispronounced pretty much by everybody I meet, even right after I say it to them. But it doesn't bother me that much, seeing as how there are at least three different ways it's pronounced within the family, and I use one of the "wrong" pronunciations myself.
  #129  
Old 03-03-2016, 12:43 PM
Abner Ravenwood Abner Ravenwood is offline
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Originally Posted by Kamino Neko View Post
I generally see it more with regular names with multiple pronunciations. (Ahn-dray-ah vs An-dree-ah vs Ahn-dree-ah, for Andrea, frex.) It does drive me nuts. Especially because the victims never get tired of having their names constantly mispronounced at them and correct people.
Speaking of Andrea, I learned the hard way in my college Italian class that Andrea is a men's name in Italy, after the professor and the class had a good laugh at my expense.

Another pro tip is to make sure you pronounce words with double consonants, such as "anno," properly. Otherwise you might tell the class that you are expecting to graduate from college next anus.
  #130  
Old 03-03-2016, 01:29 PM
aldiboronti aldiboronti is offline
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It alwys bugs me to hear Professor Xavier pronounced Gzavier in X-Men. Initial X in English is pronounced as Z, for God's sake. We don't play gzylophones.
  #131  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:21 PM
fachverwirrt fachverwirrt is offline
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It alwys bugs me to hear Professor Xavier pronounced Gzavier in X-Men. Initial X in English is pronounced as Z, for God's sake. We don't play gzylophones.
I have a student named Xavier who pronounces it that way.

Even if English had phonemic consistency (it doesn't), people can pronounce their names however the hell they want.

(That said, I have no idea if there is a canonic pronunciation of Professor X.)
  #132  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:42 PM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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(That said, I have no idea if there is a canonic pronunciation of Professor X.)
"Professor Gz"
  #133  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:45 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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Stars. Is there any indication that in real life a star looks like a five- or six-pointed 'star?' I don't think so.
  #134  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:46 PM
Green Bean Green Bean is offline
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In general. I will never forget a character on 21 Jump St saying "I grew up in mun-auch-ee, New Jersey." How did you grow up there and not learn it is pronounced MOON-auck-ee? Couldn't someone on the show call the borough hall and get the correct pronounciation.
I read that and realized I didn't actually know where Moonachie is. So I googled it.

And one of the first hits directed me to the Moonachie Poilce Department.


ETA: It's in the green text on the Google resilts page.

Last edited by Green Bean; 03-03-2016 at 02:48 PM.
  #135  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:53 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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I read that and realized I didn't actually know where Moonachie is. So I googled it.

And one of the first hits directed me to the Moonachie Poilce Department.


ETA: It's in the green text on the Google resilts page.
Of course, because green is the ideal color to represent silt.
  #136  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:55 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Sorry, but I have to nitpick your nitpick. My father who for 40 years after WWII was in charge of building some very large very famous concrete buildings here in Southern California always said pour. As in we are pouring on Friday, so I will be home late.
Yeah, it's common usage, even in the trade. Our guys always said "We've got a concrete pour tomorrow". It's shorthand and easier to say than 'placement'.
  #137  
Old 03-03-2016, 02:58 PM
Velocity Velocity is offline
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This is a dire nuclear crisis! We're going to DEFCON 5!
  #138  
Old 03-03-2016, 03:05 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Quoth Nava:

There's a character in the Ring of Fire series whose name is probably Magda. Probably, I say, because it gets spelled Madga half the freaking time.
Definitely "Magda", because it's short for "Magdalena". I didn't notice the misspellings, though.
  #139  
Old 03-03-2016, 03:10 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Stars. Is there any indication that in real life a star looks like a five- or six-pointed 'star?'
Fun fact: In heraldry, stars are usually referred to as mullets, i.e., spurs.
  #140  
Old 03-03-2016, 03:47 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Fun fact: In heraldry, stars are usually referred to as mullets, i.e., spurs.
When they're not called etoiles.
  #141  
Old 03-03-2016, 05:00 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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When they're not called etoiles.
That too.
  #142  
Old 03-03-2016, 05:53 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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One thing that baffled me, and still does, was the scene in Jurassic Park where the lass looks at a full-screen-graphics display of a fly-through of something – just a bunch of moving colored outlines – and declared, "This is UNIX!" There was no obvious clue that would have identified the type of OS, the only thing I could imagine is that, peripherally, she saw a 3-button mouse and/or a particular keyboard layout, but the impression given was that she made the determination by looking at the display. It made no sense.
  #143  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:02 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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One thing that baffled me, and still does, was the scene in Jurassic Park where the lass looks at a full-screen-graphics display of a fly-through of something just a bunch of moving colored outlines and declared, "This is UNIX!" There was no obvious clue that would have identified the type of OS, the only thing I could imagine is that, peripherally, she saw a 3-button mouse and/or a particular keyboard layout, but the impression given was that she made the determination by looking at the display. It made no sense.
Not true. I saw Jurassic Park on opening night with some friends, including one who is an excellent programmer. When that scene came up, he looked at the screen and said to me "that's Unix" just a few seconds before the girl on screen said it.

I asked him about it some time later and he said the giveaway was the directory names in the interface, "/bin", "/etc", "/home" and things like that. Classic Unix. Maybe you can't make out the names when it's shows on television, but on a theater screen they were visible.
  #144  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:02 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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One thing that baffled me, and still does, was the scene in Jurassic Park where the lass looks at a full-screen-graphics display of a fly-through of something – just a bunch of moving colored outlines – and declared, "This is UNIX!" There was no obvious clue that would have identified the type of OS, the only thing I could imagine is that, peripherally, she saw a 3-button mouse and/or a particular keyboard layout, but the impression given was that she made the determination by looking at the display. It made no sense.
It is 3D file system program fsn on UNIX-based IRIX.

Last edited by thelurkinghorror; 03-03-2016 at 06:03 PM.
  #145  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:03 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Speaking of Andrea, I learned the hard way in my college Italian class that Andrea is a men's name in Italy, after the professor and the class had a good laugh at my expense.
My mom was in a college class with an earnest young woman who was going on about how important Evelyn Waugh's female perspective was.
  #146  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:10 PM
Ignatz Ignatz is offline
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Yesterday I heard a radio interview about the NC Gov's proposal to float a multimillion$ bond issue for mostly education infrastructure and the PhD president of a community college referred at least twice to a "criteria". Arrgghh. One is a criterion. More than one are criteria.
  #147  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:10 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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My mom was in a college class with an earnest young woman who was going on about how important Evelyn Waugh's female perspective was.
TIME magazine listed Evelyn Waugh as one of the greatest female writers.

Quote:
Speaking of Andrea, I learned the hard way in my college Italian class that Andrea is a men's name in Italy
I saw a TV series about a young American woman who was going to school in England. She stopped introducing herself with "Hi, I'm Randy" after people would snigger every time she did it.
  #148  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:21 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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Yesterday I heard a radio interview about the NC Gov's proposal to float a multimillion$ bond issue for mostly education infrastructure and the PhD president of a community college referred at least twice to a "criteria". Arrgghh. One is a criterion. More than one are criteria.
That is chump change compared to the run of a college catalog we printed a number of years ago. Imagine looking at tens of thousands of these enticements for higher education with a teaser at the top that said, "Finding Your Nitch".
  #149  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:23 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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The 3D objects in the silly graphical interface all had filenames attached to them (mostly, directory names, actually). It's not implausible that some of those directory names were things like /usr/local or /etc/bin which would be distinctively recognizable as Unix.

Or, of course, she might have happened to have had the same silly graphical interface (which did actually exist) installed on her own computer at home.
  #150  
Old 03-03-2016, 07:01 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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I saw a TV series about a young American woman who was going to school in England. She stopped introducing herself with "Hi, I'm Randy" after people would snigger every time she did it.
I once heard of a Czech girl who loved going to the theatre. So she told her British boyfriend she was a real "goer."
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