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  #351  
Old 03-21-2016, 11:31 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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So Terrible Chester is an. . . 'odd Thomas (cat).'
  #352  
Old 03-21-2016, 11:47 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Originally Posted by fachverwirrt View Post
One that just came up in my household:

Watching The West Wing, there's an episode featuring a choir singing Vivaldi's Gloria, but the choir is singing in German Latin [in ɛk-sɛl-sis deo], instead of Italian/liturgical Latin.

I may be a choir geek.
Are you saying the sɛl part should be t͡ʃɛl ("chel")? Because it's been a spell, but I remember the soft version being fine in church.
  #353  
Old 03-22-2016, 08:16 AM
fachverwirrt fachverwirrt is offline
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Generally [ʃɛl] ("shell") is fine for "excelsis". But [sɛl] ("sell") (and the general case of -ce or -ci being pronounced as "s") is something I've only encountered in German Latin. Also, the bright closed [e] instead of [ɛ] in "deo" (sounding almost like dee-o) is pretty typical in German. In church Latin you'd expect [dɛ-o].

It's Season 4, Episode 4 (The Red Mass) at about 37:40 if you want to hear for yourself.
  #354  
Old 03-22-2016, 02:02 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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Well, for you Latin geeks, O Caritas by Yusuf Stevens is an interesting study. He pronounces "concipitur" as "consipitur", which is maybe not all that odd; "homines" sounds a lot like "hominis"; I think "magnus" is supposed to be like "manyoos", not "mag-noos"; but at the last line, "resurgit" completely loses any "g" sound, which to me sounds kind of wrong. Perhaps it is just down to poetic license (or licence).

Last edited by eschereal; 03-22-2016 at 02:03 PM.
  #355  
Old 03-22-2016, 05:16 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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My peeve...

On The Voice, the coaches select teams of singers during the auditions, then they immediately begin paring their teams down through Battle rounds and Knockouts. Two singers from a team are paired up, and the coach selects which one to keep.

However, they have this feature they call the Steal, whereby the other coaches can elect to take on the eliminated contestant to their team. Each coach has two steals in the Battles and one in Knockouts.

What annoys me is that they call it a steal. Steal implies taking something the other person is keeping. What they are doing is Saving the contestant the other coach has eliminated.

This annoys me every damn time.
  #356  
Old 03-23-2016, 08:25 AM
BwanaBob BwanaBob is offline
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Originally Posted by Haldurson View Post
I don't think I ever pronounced the 'H' in the city name -- always called it YUE-stin. That's how most people pronounce it around here (New York). As far as the street name is concerned, yeah, you can always tell if someone was originally from NYC, by whether they pronounce it the same as the city name or by its proper pronunciation.
Uh, the Texas city was named after Sam Houston, who pronounced it the way you're accustomed to. Houston Street was named after William Houstoun, who was a Continental Congress delegate (pronounced the way that bothers you). The street predates Mr. Sam, who was a Tennessee teenager when it was so christened. So if you're going to be pissy about it, Sam and the city are pronouncing it wrong.

See the wiki on the street and have ignorance fought Houston Street
  #357  
Old 03-23-2016, 09:09 AM
Peremensoe Peremensoe is offline
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So if you're going to be pissy about it, Sam and the city are pronouncing it wrong.
Nobody pronounces their own name wrong.
  #358  
Old 03-23-2016, 09:17 AM
fachverwirrt fachverwirrt is offline
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Sure they do.
  #359  
Old 03-23-2016, 11:26 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Yes, but she pronounces it "Throat-warbler Mangrave".
  #360  
Old 03-23-2016, 11:34 AM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
Yep, and gullible isn't even in the dictionary.

About the less and fewer thing- when I was in school, teachers always told us one was for amounts and the other was for quantities. Which was for which, I don't remember. Those teachers also preached the use of dictionaries, apparently for others but not themselves. When I looked up amount and quantity, quantity was defined as amount, and amount as quantity. I blame this for those of my generation not knowing when to use less or fewer. Nowadays, many teachers say fewer is for things counted, and less for amounts not counted. This makes more sense.
Part of the problem is that English does not (to the best of my knowledge) distinguish between the opposites for "less" and "fewer". What is the opposite of "less"? "More". What is the opposite of "fewer"? "More".

Another data point: In arithmetic, the symbol "<" is regarded as "less than", so we would interpret "3 < 4" as "three is less than four", in a situation where we are speaking of numbers. So, it becomes natural to say, "Three apples are less than four apples."

I think this usage may also relate to units of measure. Would we say that a person's height is "fewer" than six feet? (Now that I think about it, though, in this usage, we are really talking about an amount rather than a distinct quantity.)
  #361  
Old 03-23-2016, 11:37 AM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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One of my fiercest gripes is really bad Elizabethan/Jacobean. There was a recent Donald Duck comic book where the writers just glued "eth" on the end of any old verb (and not a few nouns!) Absolutely illiterate!



Um... Huh? How do you figure? The standard viewpoint is exactly the opposite of this. ("Exactly" is like "unique" in that it makes no sense to modify it.)

(Exception: is "almost" a modifier? Lots of things are "almost unique.")
Remember, you are unique. Just like everyone else.
  #362  
Old 03-23-2016, 12:42 PM
j666 j666 is offline
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(Exception: is "almost" a modifier? Lots of things are "almost unique.")
Or "rare".

Even "unusual", perhaps "atypical", for those for whom one syllable is never enough
(see: "use" versus "utilize").
  #363  
Old 03-23-2016, 02:06 PM
fachverwirrt fachverwirrt is offline
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Remember, you are unique. Just like everyone else.
Actually, I'm the only person in the world who's not unique.
  #364  
Old 03-23-2016, 07:57 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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Originally Posted by OffByOne View Post
Another data point: In arithmetic, the symbol "<" is regarded as "less than", so we would interpret "3 < 4" as "three is less than four", in a situation where we are speaking of numbers. So, it becomes natural to say, "Three apples are less than four apples."

I think this usage may also relate to units of measure. Would we say that a person's height is "fewer" than six feet? (Now that I think about it, though, in this usage, we are really talking about an amount rather than a distinct quantity.)
Funny, I addressed this before, but somehow I didn't put the link.

http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2...less-or-fewer/

In those uses, we are treating "three apples" and "four apples" as total amounts, not groups of individual items. They are functioning as collective nouns. Same thing with "six feet" - we are emphasizing a single total item, not six separate feet.
  #365  
Old 03-23-2016, 08:13 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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In those uses, we are treating "three apples" and "four apples" as total amounts, not groups of individual items.
But you can do that with anything. The express line at the store, that requires ten items or less? It's treating ten items as a total amount.
  #366  
Old 03-24-2016, 02:06 AM
heckofva heckofva is offline
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
I know it's not quite the same thing, but I was taught to keep the hammer down on an empty cylinder on a revolver (even though there are built-in protections against discharging from dropping the gun.)

If I were a gun-carrying security guard with an auto at my hip, I'd carry it on an empty chamber, just because it's how I was brought up. (Doubly so if I'd been on the job for a couple years and never once had to draw my weapon...)

Don't be too derisive of the force of tradition!
Yes but with most revolvers as the hammer is pulled back (or double action as the the trigger) is pulled the cylinder rotates so the hammer will fall on the loaded cylinder so no extra action is required to make the gun function. with a semi you would have to rack the slide costing valuable time in a shooting save my life situation.

I'm sure the concept comes from the fact that with most squibs they don't have the power to charge the weapon, hence with the fake ammo you would have to charge the weapon to reset the trigger and feed the round. So those without knowledge assume that's how guns work. Plus I guess it makes for "Good Hollywood" to show the racking of the slide.
  #367  
Old 03-24-2016, 03:34 AM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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Originally Posted by fachverwirrt View Post
Actually, I'm the only person in the world who's not unique.
There'd have to be at least two, wouldn't there?
  #368  
Old 03-24-2016, 06:02 AM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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There'd have to be at least two, wouldn't there?
Whooosh!
  #369  
Old 03-24-2016, 10:19 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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I dunno, I can picture "the only one that's not unique" as having some meaning. Imagine we have a set of five items: A large red wooden square, a small red wooden square, a large green wooden square, a large red metal square, and a large red wooden triangle. The second one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different size. The third one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different color. The fourth one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different material. And the fifth one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different shape. But the first one isn't unique, since it has the most common version of each trait.
  #370  
Old 03-24-2016, 11:37 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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I dunno, I can picture "the only one that's not unique" as having some meaning. Imagine we have a set of five items: A large red wooden square, a small red wooden square, a large green wooden square, a large red metal square, and a large red wooden triangle. The second one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different size. The third one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different color. The fourth one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different material. And the fifth one is unique, in that it's the only one that's a different shape. But the first one isn't unique, since it has the most common version of each trait.
Yeah, "unique" is just one of those words people like being pedantic about for whatever reason. I'm fine with degrees of uniqueness, especially since things can be unique in multiple ways.
  #371  
Old 03-26-2016, 11:39 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Here's one I saw just the other day: Referring to a particular act as "a crime punishable by prosecution". So, if I go to court and get found guilty, I'll have to go back to court?

Similar is treating "court-martial" as a punishment, though that at least can maybe be justified by civilian ignorance of how the military works.
  #372  
Old 03-26-2016, 03:26 PM
Johnny Angel Johnny Angel is offline
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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Well, for you Latin geeks, O Caritas by Yusuf Stevens is an interesting study. He pronounces "concipitur" as "consipitur", which is maybe not all that odd; "homines" sounds a lot like "hominis"; I think "magnus" is supposed to be like "manyoos", not "mag-noos"; but at the last line, "resurgit" completely loses any "g" sound, which to me sounds kind of wrong. Perhaps it is just down to poetic license (or licence).
Well, first off there's a straight-up grammatical error: omnia rēs should be omnēs rēs. Omnia is neuter plural, and rēs is feminine plural. The translations provided in that video are not what I would give, but bit that bugs me is that nunc concipitur/malī hominis crīmen is translated as now does the blame fall upon bad men. I'd render it more like "Now the sin of the man is understood". But what he wants here is for 'the man' to actually be 'mankind' and I don't recall ever seeing homō ever used in the abstract sense of 'humankind'. Someone else may recall a case, but I don't see this usage listed in my dictionaries either.
  #373  
Old 03-27-2016, 05:46 AM
Lorne Armstrong Lorne Armstrong is offline
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In the film Stir Crazy, the two main characters are convicted of committing a federal crime yet they are sent to a state prison.

Whenever somebody quotes Nixon saying "I am not a cook" when it's "I'm not a crook."

1970's hairstyles on M*A*S*H and Happy Days.

People claiming that Hogan's Heroes took place in a Nazi concentration camp when in fact it took place in a POW camp. (Huge difference.)

All In The Family did not change its title to Archie Bunker's Place. All In The Family left the air in 1979 and Archie Bunker's Place was a spinoff.

And speaking of All In The Family, Meathead was suppose to have been born and raised in Chicago yet his accent was clearly NYC.

Why does Fonzie have a northeastern accent? And why if Fonzie is an auto mechanic did he never own a car during the show's entire run?

Claiming that early MTV didn't show videos by black artists because of racism. In actuality, there were few black artists shown because they were a rock and roll station and most black musicians at that time were more R&B.

Referring to mass murderers and spree killers as serial killers.

"That last song was by Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones."
  #374  
Old 03-27-2016, 06:17 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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. . . Referring to mass murderers and spree killers as serial killers. . . .
??? Why is this wrong? They're doing the same thing serially, i.e., once, twice, three times, four times... That's a series, innit? I don't get the formal distinction.
  #375  
Old 03-27-2016, 07:03 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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Mass murder is killing a bunch all at once.

Spree killing is running around from location to location, essentially a mass killing across multiple locales.

Serial killing is taking one person and killing them. Then later, taking another person and killing them. Then later, taking another person and killing them.

Mass murder and spree killing don't really have patterns associated with their targets, they are primarily targets of opportunity. The defining characteristic of serial killers is that they do have a pattern in selecting victims, whether it's in the victims or in the means of selecting them.
  #376  
Old 03-27-2016, 09:05 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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Whenever somebody quotes Nixon saying "I am not a cook" when it's "I'm not a crook."
That first showed up (TMBK) in a SNL sketch where someone was interviewing the former president (Aykroyd).

Quote:
Why does Fonzie have a northeastern accent? And why if Fonzie is an auto mechanic did he never own a car during the show's entire run?
Well, that is not the worst sin of that show. It supposedly takes place in Wisconsin, but you see only a light dusting of snow in two or three episodes. In that time period, there should have been at least a foot of snow on the ground in half or more of the episodes, and you should have been able to see the characters' breath outside in two-thirds of them.
  #377  
Old 03-27-2016, 11:44 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Whenever somebody quotes Nixon saying "I am not a cook" when it's "I'm not a crook."
Cook? In which situations has this come up, I have never, ever heard this, and if I have it was an obvious joke.

Or did you mean "I am" vs. "I'm"? In which case, play it again, Sam.

Quote:
All In The Family did not change its title to Archie Bunker's Place. All In The Family left the air in 1979 and Archie Bunker's Place was a spinoff.
Not really an error like your example, but the show "Little Rascals" was really "Our Gang," and acquired the former title decades later in syndication. Nowadays the original title is much less known.
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Well, that is not the worst sin of that show. It supposedly takes place in Wisconsin, but you see only a light dusting of snow in two or three episodes. In that time period, there should have been at least a foot of snow on the ground in half or more of the episodes, and you should have been able to see the characters' breath outside in two-thirds of them.
Reno 911 is obviously filmed in Los Angeles as it never snows and palm trees are everywhere instead of sagebrush.
  #378  
Old 03-27-2016, 11:54 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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References to witches being burned at the stake in Salem or anywhere else in America. Can't think of an example off-hand, but trust me: it's more common than you might think.

On other historical notes, comments about people thinking the Earth was flat 500 years ago or how 40 was old in the 19th century.

Thick stock southern accents in shows about New Orleans; New Orleans has several accents of its own, none of which are of the "Ah'm sippin' mah julep on the verander" variety and some of which sound a lot more like various parts of NYC than the surrounding southern states.
  #379  
Old 03-29-2016, 12:49 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Actually, I'm the only person in the world who's not unique.
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Originally Posted by Robot Arm View Post
There'd have to be at least two, wouldn't there?
There can only be one.
  #380  
Old 05-19-2016, 12:05 PM
Commander Benson Commander Benson is offline
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The Most Misquoted Television Line of All

Complete this famous opening phrase . . . .

Faster than a speeding bullet; more powerful than a locomotive; ________________

I would wager 97% of you answered:

Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound!

. . . and you'd be wrong.



The bullet/locomotive/tall building triad was used in the opening narratives to the Adventures of Superman radio programme, the seventeen Superman cartoons put out by Fleischer/Famous studios in the 1940's, and the Adventures of Superman television series. And the lines were identical in all three media.

As reported, Superman was faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, and . . .

. . . able to leap tall buildings at a single bound!

That's right. Not "in"---"at". Yet, for all of its prevalence, one almost never hears the phrase repeated accurately.

Last edited by Commander Benson; 05-19-2016 at 12:06 PM.
  #381  
Old 05-19-2016, 06:19 PM
Ignatz Ignatz is offline
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"As far as" instead of "As for".
"In terms of" instead of "As for". (Not incorrect, just stilted)
  #382  
Old 05-19-2016, 06:33 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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"As for" isn't stilted? I've never even heard that expression.
  #383  
Old 05-19-2016, 07:30 PM
Peremensoe Peremensoe is offline
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"You can say there's no such thing as Santa, but as for me and Grandpa, we believe!"


"As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord."
  #384  
Old 05-19-2016, 08:57 PM
Marine_One Marine_One is offline
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Drives me crazy when there is a show/film about a music conductor and he just waves his arms around.

Doesn't even come close to finding the beat or anything else.

Just flailing away at the air.
  #385  
Old 05-20-2016, 02:52 AM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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1970's hairstyles on M*A*S*H
The "Koreans" in black pyjamas? The funny helicopters shown? That on TV a 3 year war lasted 11 years?

You pick one thing to be offended by, and it's the haircuts?
  #386  
Old 05-20-2016, 07:38 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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The show didn't depict the war as lasting 11 years. That's not an error that the show committed.
  #387  
Old 05-20-2016, 10:05 AM
Tired and Cranky Tired and Cranky is offline
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Drives me crazy when there is a show/film about a music conductor and he just waves his arms around.

Doesn't even come close to finding the beat or anything else.

Just flailing away at the air.
I'm not very musical but I notice this too sometimes. I always get bogged down though wondering if it was the actor who missed the beat or whether something got lost during the film and sound editing. The sound on the stage probably didn't match what's in the film.
  #388  
Old 05-20-2016, 10:37 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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I'm sure the concept comes from the fact that with most squibs they don't have the power to charge the weapon, hence with the fake ammo you would have to charge the weapon to reset the trigger and feed the round. So those without knowledge assume that's how guns work. Plus I guess it makes for "Good Hollywood" to show the racking of the slide.
I was going to post that people working the action on their firearms bugs the hell out of me. Nearly every time, they're in a situation where they would already have a round chambered.

Somewhere, hidden away in a box in a storage unit, I have a couple of 'Hollywood style' blank firing adapters for M-16s/AR-15s. These are plugs with small holes in them, that fit between the muzzle and the flash suppressor. Since blanks do not have a projectile, there's no 'equal and opposite reaction' to push the bolt or slide back, nor anything to make the gas go through the gas port in gas-operated firearms. Restricting the barrel with a plug with a hole in it simulates a bullet in the cartridge. With an M-16 it's easy. I'm guessing it's easy with any firearm that has a flash suppressor or muzzle brake. Other guns take a little more work. For one film we modified the writer/producer/director's Beretta 92FS to fire blanks. We bought a threaded plug from the hardware store and threaded the breech of the barrel. We drilled a hole in the plug. It turned out the hole needed to be larger than we thought, but before that we couldn't get the pistol to cycle. We had to grind the lugs off of the locking block. Then it was a matter of widening the hole in the breech plug until pressures were brought down to a reasonable level so as not to slam the slide back. Of course this made the pistol unusable for live ammunition, and it would need a new barrel and locking block to convert it back. And of course, 'Don't try this at home.'

Blank-firing prop guns are available to rent. Robert Rodriguez didn't in El Mariachi because he didn't have the budget and he borrowed guns from the local police, so he had to work the action for every round. (He edited so that it looked like machine guns worked like machine guns.) But any TV series or just about any movie is going to have the budget to hire an armorer and blank-firing prop guns. So working the action is 'Good Hollywood' for people who don't know how guns work, but -inducing for people who do.
  #389  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:00 AM
DrForrester DrForrester is offline
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Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
Nobody pronounces their own name wrong.
Incorrectly. "Wrong" is an adjective. To modify a verb, you need to use an adverb.

I mention this as it is a tiny error, perpetuated endlessly, that drives me insane. Did nobody pay attention in high school?
  #390  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:28 AM
MaxTheVool MaxTheVool is offline
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Incorrectly. "Wrong" is an adjective. To modify a verb, you need to use an adverb.
You are wrongly
  #391  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:41 AM
MaxTheVool MaxTheVool is offline
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I'm not very musical but I notice this too sometimes. I always get bogged down though wondering if it was the actor who missed the beat or whether something got lost during the film and sound editing. The sound on the stage probably didn't match what's in the film.
I remembered listening to the director's commentary for the cheerleading movie Bring It On, and there are several scenes where one of the actors is dancing, and the director describes how there was no music on set, and he was just yelling out "slower" or "faster" or something like that, and then music was added much later, when they had figured out what songs they had the rights to, and so forth. I'd imagine scenes of conductors might be quite similar.
  #392  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:56 AM
DrForrester DrForrester is offline
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You are wrongly
I was entirely prepared to admit the error of my ways. Then, I read the page to which you linked. I'm feeling much better now. Thank You!
  #393  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:58 AM
fachverwirrt fachverwirrt is offline
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Incorrectly. "Wrong" is an adjective. To modify a verb, you need to use an adverb.

I mention this as it is a tiny error, perpetuated endlessly, that drives me insane. Did nobody pay attention in high school?
Tell it to the OED.
  #394  
Old 05-20-2016, 02:35 PM
misling misling is offline
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It's extremely petty, but it's also on the front page of the Straight Dope today:
the lyrics are "Memories LIGHT the corners of my mind" not "Memories, like the corners..."

Last edited by misling; 05-20-2016 at 02:35 PM. Reason: bugs me every time I come by...
  #395  
Old 05-20-2016, 03:51 PM
MaxTheVool MaxTheVool is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrForrester View Post
I was entirely prepared to admit the error of my ways. Then, I read the page to which you linked. I'm feeling much better now. Thank You!
How about this one?

Some select quotes:

Quote:
But wrong can also be an adverb. There’s nothing in the least new about this — the Oxford English Dictionary has examples from the thirteenth century onwards.
Quote:
The quick and easy rule is that wrongly appears before the verb being modified (“the earlier case was wrongly decided”) and wrong after the verb (“he answered the question wrong”). Like most such rules, it’s not even half the story
Quote:
More generally, English makes much less distinction between adverbs and adjectives than the more elementary grammar books would have us believe. It might be better to class such words under the general title of modifier (although contemporary grammarians reserve this word for a different phenomenon); often the form of the modifier doesn’t match the rule we learned in childhood about adding -ly to make adverbs. Lots of words that look like adjectives can act as adverbs, particularly in idiomatic English: “try hard”, “turn sharp left”, “hold tight”, “he had spread himself too thin”, “the desk was piled high with files”, “he burrowed deep into his memory”, “leave it as late as you can”, “the ships were wide apart”, “teach him to hold his pen right”. They’re sometimes called flat adverbs.
Quote:
To sum all this up, in the phrase “spelling his name wrong”, wrong is idiomatically correct but wrongly is acceptable, though formal and less common.
  #396  
Old 05-20-2016, 03:56 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrForrester View Post
Incorrectly. "Wrong" is an adjective. To modify a verb, you need to use an adverb.

I mention this as it is a tiny error, perpetuated endlessly, that drives me insane. Did nobody pay attention in high school?
Dictionary.com thinks you're wrong, as well.

Quote:
adverb
in a wrong manner; not rightly; awry; amiss:
You did it wrong again.
  #397  
Old 05-20-2016, 03:59 PM
Big_Norse Big_Norse is offline
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I've mentioned my pet peeve of misusing "fewer" and "less" before. It seems to be cropping up in commercials more and more lately.

Speaking of mispronunciation: a newer one I've started noticing in TV shows is characters mentioning "Calling in the calvary." Or "We're going to need the calvary." Calvary vs. Cavalry
  #398  
Old 05-20-2016, 04:36 PM
fachverwirrt fachverwirrt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxTheVool's link
But wrong can also be an adverb. There’s nothing in the least new about this — the Oxford English Dictionary has examples from the thirteenth century onwards.
This is totally incorrect! The earliest usage in the OED is from 1330: clearly the 14th century!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Norse View Post
I've mentioned my pet peeve of misusing "fewer" and "less" before. It seems to be cropping up in commercials more and more lately.
As I mentioned a few pages back, while "fewer" is indeed restricted to countable quantities, "less" is not now, nor has it ever been, restricted to uncountables.

And a link!
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