Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 03-16-2016, 09:54 AM
Smitty Smitty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 804
The Godfather had a big impact on the Mafia. After the movie came out, they changed from what we today would call "street thugs" and began to purposely conduct themselves in what they felt was a more dignified fashion.

http://www.theage.com.au/entertainme...913-158dl.html
Advertisements  
  #52  
Old 03-16-2016, 09:57 AM
JoseB JoseB is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Den Haag, NL
Posts: 1,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sampiro View Post
According to accounts at the time the 1983 TV movie The Day After (which my family was about the only family in the nation that didn't watch) supposedly spiked a huge interest in what we'd now call survivalism. According to accounts at the time, sales of everything from home generators to bunkers to wagons multiplied.

Though I'd go with the already mentioned Birth of a Nation as the number 1 answer.
About The Day After, the Wikipedia article mentions that it influenced policymakers. Copypasting from there:

President Ronald Reagan watched the film several days before its screening, on November 5, 1983. He wrote in his diary that the film was "very effective and left me greatly depressed,"[16] and that it changed his mind on the prevailing policy on a "nuclear war".[18] The film was also screened for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A government advisor who attended the screening, a friend of Meyer's [Meyer was the director of the film], told him "If you wanted to draw blood, you did it. Those guys sat there like they were turned to stone." Four years later, the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty was signed and in Reagan's memoirs he drew a direct line from the film to the signing.[16]

(The text with reference [16] is taken from an article in Empire Magazine published in November 2010, and the text with reference [18] is from Reagan's book An American Life).
__________________
NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition!
  #53  
Old 03-16-2016, 10:32 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 37,569
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoseB View Post
I read somewhere that Hitchcock's "Psycho" had a similar effect with respect to showers...
My husband told me the because of Psycho, his mother won't shower if she's home alone.
  #54  
Old 03-16-2016, 08:32 PM
epbrown01 epbrown01 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,169
The Fast and the Furious popularized the until-then small Japanese import scene.
  #55  
Old 03-16-2016, 10:21 PM
PastTense PastTense is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5,906
So no one can think of any impact James Bond movies had?
  #56  
Old 03-16-2016, 10:52 PM
theR theR is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,083
I agree with WarGames. It literally led to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) being passed in 1984. You could even argue that Reagan thought it was nonfiction based on what he said about it. I'll post an excerpt from the article linked by Tired and Cranky.

Quote:
"WarGames" inspired these extra-long prison terms. As soon as it was released in June 1983, the movie, starring Matthew Broderick as a teenage hacker who broke into NORAD's mainframe and nearly ignited World War III, electrified Capitol Hill and kicked off an anti-hacker panic.

No fewer than six different anti-hacking bills were introduced that year, and Congress convened its first hearings as soon as politicians returned from their summer recess. Rep. Dan Glickman, a Kansas Democrat, opened the proceedings by saying: "We're gonna show about four minutes from the movie 'WarGames,' which I think outlines the problem fairly clearly." A House committee report solemnly intoned: "'WarGames' showed a realistic representation of the automatic dialing and access capabilities of the personal computer."

"WarGames," the first movie to profile hacking so prominently, spilled over into unrelated discussions about national security: a biography of Ronald Reagan recounts how the president asked a group of Democratic congressmen meeting at the White House to discuss arms reduction if they had watched the movie. Rep. Vic Fazio, a California Democrat, recalled Reagan saying: "I don't understand these computers very well, but this young man obviously did. He had tied into NORAD!"
http://www.cnet.com/news/from-wargam...w-went-astray/

Last edited by theR; 03-16-2016 at 10:55 PM. Reason: Saw that someone already mentioned it!
  #57  
Old 03-21-2016, 06:14 PM
HeyHomie HeyHomie is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Viburnum, MO
Posts: 9,107
I don't know if it's truth or urban legend, but I've heard that the deer hunting industry took years to recover from Bambi.
  #58  
Old 03-21-2016, 06:43 PM
Saltire Saltire is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 3,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by epbrown01 View Post
The Fast and the Furious popularized the until-then small Japanese import scene.
I assume you mean for street racing. There was no lack of Japanese import cars before that movie.
  #59  
Old 03-21-2016, 07:15 PM
Declan Declan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Barrie , Ontario
Posts: 5,076
I think it influenced a number of things in the real world. If I remember right, the russian astronaut brought over the fresh bottle of 02, and it had a nonstandard plug in. Which meant A for effort, but did not help.

So it was instrumental in standardizing a bunch of different things, in space craft design on both sides.

Another was a book about the space shuttle having to do an abort, and landing on Easter Island, and having to come up with Passports, which at the time was never needed. So anything manned going up, had some sort of documentation if needed. In the book, they took the refueling probe off an A7 or F-8, as the 747 lifter, had no inflight capability. In the real world, I dont recall if the lifter has inflight capabilty.

Declan
  #60  
Old 03-21-2016, 07:50 PM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The land of the mouse
Posts: 43,108
A single line in the film Sideways depressed sales of Merlot wine for years.
  #61  
Old 03-22-2016, 01:07 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny California
Posts: 14,218
One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest -- Novel by Ken Kesey (1962), and the movie (1975) starring Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher.

The popular rebellion against forced institutionalization in mental hospitals, and against the degrading institutional treatment and forced medications and electroshock treatments, was already a growing movement, I believe. The book and the movie further planted the distrust of mental institutions in the public mind, and I think was instrumental in the movement towards de-institutionalizing the mentally ill.

The Rosenhan Pseudo-Patient Experiment, published in 1973, was also done in about that same time period: On Being Sane in Insane Places also contributed very much to the popular distrust of all things psychiatric.

I think this also gave a big boost to Jack Nicholson's acting career. His prior main movies, such as Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces I think were seen more as cultural niche films.

Last edited by Senegoid; 03-22-2016 at 01:09 AM.
  #62  
Old 03-22-2016, 09:40 AM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Robocop -- there is now a real company named OCP selling movie products like Brawndo.
  #63  
Old 03-22-2016, 10:29 AM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 11,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoseB View Post
Four years later, the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty was signed and in Reagan's memoirs he drew a direct line from the film to the signing.[16]
Not influential, but Saturday Night Live succinctly summed up the reasoning that led to the treaty.

At the time, it was being recognized that forward-based nuclear weapons were vulnerable to being overrun in the early hours of a military crisis, creating unbearable pressure to "use them or lose them."

In an SNL skit mimicking those current-events roundtable shows where talking heads argue and bloviate, Phil Hartmann's Frankenstein's Monster was asked his opinion on forward-based intermediate nuclear forces.

"FIRE BAD!" the monster bellowed, his signature phrase. Becoming agitated, he had to be calmed by his fellow talking heads.

And in a nutshell, that's the single thought that drove both nations to the bargaining table.

Last edited by Sailboat; 03-22-2016 at 10:30 AM.
  #64  
Old 03-22-2016, 11:06 AM
furryman furryman is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Collinwood, Collinsport
Posts: 3,251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim View Post
Robocop -- there is now a real company named OCP selling movie products like Brawndo.
Looking on Google I see a bunch of T-Shirts, mugs, cups and even some phones. Is there actually somebody selling Brawndo energy drink?
  #65  
Old 03-22-2016, 11:15 AM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Quote:
Originally Posted by furryman View Post
Looking on Google I see a bunch of T-Shirts, mugs, cups and even some phones. Is there actually somebody selling Brawndo energy drink?
http://www.omniconsumerproductscorporation.com/
  #66  
Old 03-22-2016, 11:18 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The land of the mouse
Posts: 43,108
Does it have electrolytes?
  #67  
Old 03-22-2016, 11:19 AM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Nothing but.
  #68  
Old 03-22-2016, 12:23 PM
drad dog drad dog is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 4,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest -- Novel by Ken Kesey (1962), and the movie (1975) starring Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher.

The popular rebellion against forced institutionalization in mental hospitals, and against the degrading institutional treatment and forced medications and electroshock treatments, was already a growing movement, I believe. The book and the movie further planted the distrust of mental institutions in the public mind, and I think was instrumental in the movement towards de-institutionalizing the mentally ill.

The Rosenhan Pseudo-Patient Experiment, published in 1973, was also done in about that same time period: On Being Sane in Insane Places also contributed very much to the popular distrust of all things psychiatric.

I think this also gave a big boost to Jack Nicholson's acting career. His prior main movies, such as Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces I think were seen more as cultural niche films.
I don't think Cuckoos nest was very effective at all.

There is also a difference between "humanization", which was of the 60's, and de- institutionalization which was of the Reagan era and not humane at all.

If you want a film that changed things see this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titicut_Follies
  #69  
Old 03-22-2016, 12:39 PM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The land of the mouse
Posts: 43,108
Leni Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will had some pretty substantial RW effects, too.
  #70  
Old 03-23-2016, 06:56 AM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Gumi, S. Korea
Posts: 9,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by PastTense View Post
So no one can think of any impact James Bond movies had?
Fifty years in, I don't have a jet pack yet, or even a suitcase helicopter. But hey, didn't Roger Moore kind of invent snowboarding?
  #71  
Old 03-23-2016, 08:05 AM
TV time TV time is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,584
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop View Post
Fifty years in, I don't have a jet pack yet, or even a suitcase helicopter. But hey, didn't Roger Moore kind of invent snowboarding?
Hey! I have a car that lays down a oil slick...Well, I guess that has more to do with the hole in my oil pan than wanting to be like Bond, though.
  #72  
Old 03-23-2016, 08:19 AM
TV time TV time is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,584
It was said at the time the film came out and a few years after that every time The Longest Day played in a town, enlistments in the military went up.

I had a professor who contended that the films that had the most effect on society were Birth of a Nation (mentioned earlier) and Battleship Potemkin. He contended that Battleship Potemkin could be credited with keeping the Soviet Union afloat on a number of occasions early in existence.

Last edited by TV time; 03-23-2016 at 08:21 AM.
  #73  
Old 03-23-2016, 05:47 PM
gallows fodder gallows fodder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,287
The 1948 film The Snake Pit (great film, btw) catalyzed legislation to improve conditions in mental institutions in half the states in the nation (or so the studio. claimed).
  #74  
Old 03-24-2016, 10:55 AM
JustinC JustinC is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Any
Posts: 1,880
Possibly The Truman Show popularised reality TV, which was a very small part of television back then. Trainspotting certainly took the lustre off 'heroin chic'. A certain movie may have led to people buying less shit they don't need with money they don't have. Saving Private Ryan was a lot of positive PR for the war industry after the self-admonishing Vietnam War movies. There are plenty of examples like Lord of the Rings which promoted countries as holiday destinations.
  #75  
Old 03-24-2016, 11:12 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The land of the mouse
Posts: 43,108
On that note, we may yet find that The Martian helped reinvigorate interest and confidence in the manned spaceflight program.
  #76  
Old 03-24-2016, 11:16 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
Head Cheese
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: El Cerrito, CA
Posts: 3,763
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinC View Post
A certain movie may have led to people buying less shit they don't need with money they don't have.
What movie was this?
__________________
'Tis a pity that I have no gravy to put upon Uncle Hymie.
  #77  
Old 03-24-2016, 11:28 AM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElvisL1ves View Post
On that note, we may yet find that The Martian helped reinvigorate interest and confidence in the manned spaceflight program.
Somehow this made me think of this other thread where a bunch of college students who were offended by "Trump 2016" sidewalk chalkings couldn't figure out anything better to do about it than protest to the school's president.
  #78  
Old 03-24-2016, 11:38 AM
Stanislaus Stanislaus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: London
Posts: 2,661
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
After the release of the film Sideways (2004), sales of Merlot dropped by 2%, while Pinot Noir sales increased 16%.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElvisL1ves View Post
A single line in the film Sideways depressed sales of Merlot wine for years.
It gets better than that. French growers were in a real bind. The demand for Pinot Noir outstripped the supply, while there was a plentiful supply of Merlot nobody wanted.

What to do, what to do?

Quote:
The answer was simple: the bottles being labelled pinot noir were in fact wine made from merlot or shiraz
As a result of this scam, directly caused by Sideways' influence on the US wine market:

1) Ernst and Gallo paid €7m for the wrong wine
2) The people behind it were eventually jailed and reputations were damaged for years.
3) A lot of easily influenced clowns who had made great play of how wonderful the "Pinot Noir" they were drinking was and how superior it was to plonk like Merlot found that they had, in fact, been drinking Merlot all along.
  #79  
Old 03-24-2016, 11:51 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 8,555
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Why what?

Why do they do it?

As I say, it's an old Jewish tradition, apparently:
http://www.jcam.org/Pages/Foundation...tionstones.htm
I've always been told that it's a symbolic building of a monument.

When I was a kid, I once asked a rabbi in a religious school Q&A if you can leave stones on gentile graves, and was told that it was fine, so I guess by the same token, anyone who wants to adopt the tradition is welcome to it. It's not like keeping kosher, which the Torah says is specifically for the people of Israel, and not incumbent upon anyone else.
  #80  
Old 03-24-2016, 12:00 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
The Wallace and Gromit films definitely had an effect on the financial well-being of Wensleydale cheese (which I'd never heard of before seeing A Grand Day Out.


Wikipedia says:

Quote:
In the 1990s, sales of Wensleydale cheese had fallen so low that production was at risk of being suspended.[11] However, the popular Wallace and Gromit animated shorts A Grand Day Out and A Close Shave had the main character Wallace, a cheese connoisseur, mention Wensleydale as a particularly favourite cheese. Animator Nick Park chose it solely because it had a good name that would be interesting to animate rather than due to its origins in northern England where the shorts were set. He was also unaware of the financial difficulties that the company was experiencing.[12] The company contacted Aardman Animations about a licence for a special brand of "Wallace and Gromit Wensleydale", which proved to be an enormous success.[13] When the 2005 full-length Wallace and Gromit film, Curse of the Were-Rabbit, was released, sales of Wensleydale cheeses increased by 23%.[14][15]
I recall seeing Wensleydale cheese with a Wallace and Gromit label on it when Curse of the Were Rabbit came out.

https://www.google.com/search?q=wens...w3osvrrJQgM%3A
http://wallaceandgromit.net/wensleydale.php

On the other hand, mentioning "Wensleydale cheese" in the Monty Python cheese sketch certainly didn't have such a big effect on the cheese:

Quote:
Wensleydale was one of the cheeses named by John Cleese in the Monty Python sketch "The Cheese Shop", which originally appeared in a 1972 episode of Monty Python's Flying Circus. In addition, the shop owner, played by Michael Palin, was named 'Henry Wensleydale', which caused some confusion between the two when the cheese was mentioned.
]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wensleydale_cheese


See also here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddr...rts-surge.html

Last edited by CalMeacham; 03-24-2016 at 12:01 PM.
  #81  
Old 03-24-2016, 12:30 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
The Wallace and Gromit films definitely had an effect on the financial well-being of Wensleydale cheese (which I'd never heard of before seeing A Grand Day Out.


]
Try some with water crackers and a good ruby port.
  #82  
Old 03-24-2016, 12:37 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
Try some with water crackers and a good ruby port.
I've had Wensleydale plenty of times since I first heard of it
  #83  
Old 03-24-2016, 02:27 PM
JustinC JustinC is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Any
Posts: 1,880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Lichtman View Post
What movie was this?
It certainly wasn't a widespread influence, but it had a profound effect on a segment of the population. I'd say it was/is more influential on people's outlooks and habits than 90% of the output of Hollywood.
  #84  
Old 03-24-2016, 02:27 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinC View Post
It certainly wasn't a widespread influence, but it had a profound effect on a segment of the population. I'd say it was/is more influential on people's outlooks and habits than 90% of the output of Hollywood.
Title?
  #85  
Old 03-24-2016, 02:49 PM
davidm davidm is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Near Philadelphia PA, USA
Posts: 11,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinC View Post
A certain movie may have led to people buying less shit they don't need with money they don't have.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Lichtman View Post
What movie was this?
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinC View Post
It certainly wasn't a widespread influence, but it had a profound effect on a segment of the population. I'd say it was/is more influential on people's outlooks and habits than 90% of the output of Hollywood.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
Title?
Seriously. What's with the secrecy about the movie's damned title JustinC? Just tell us already.
  #86  
Old 03-24-2016, 03:10 PM
minor7flat5 minor7flat5 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Trenton, NJ
Posts: 4,397
My vote is for The Blues Brothers.

Ever wonder how they could get so many of the greatest names in Blues in that movie? Those folks were all hungry in lean times. The movie breathed new life into the genre (if I recall correctly).
  #87  
Old 03-24-2016, 04:05 PM
EinsteinsHund EinsteinsHund is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 2,067
Quote:
Originally Posted by minor7flat5 View Post
My vote is for The Blues Brothers.

Ever wonder how they could get so many of the greatest names in Blues in that movie? Those folks were all hungry in lean times. The movie breathed new life into the genre (if I recall correctly).
Nah, though it's the Blues Brothers, the only pure Blues act in the movie is John Lee Hooker IIRC, it's mostly about Soul music. I don't remember a distinct Soul revival at the time, but anyway it couldn't have caused a push for Blues because there was so little of it in the movie.

EDIT: to clarify, I do know the close connections between blues, soul, r&b etc. and of course most of the songs were somehow related to the blues, but overwhelmingly leaning to the r&b/soul side of the coin, with the exception of Hooker (I think it was Boogie Chillen)

Last edited by EinsteinsHund; 03-24-2016 at 04:09 PM.
  #88  
Old 03-24-2016, 04:20 PM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
Head Cheese
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: El Cerrito, CA
Posts: 3,763
The one movie I know of that revived an interest in a form of music is The Sting. The public had mostly forgotten about Scott Joplin and ragtime, but when the movie came out in 1973 people got excited about it. The Entertainer was a top 40 hit, and several LPs of ragtime music became popular.
__________________
'Tis a pity that I have no gravy to put upon Uncle Hymie.
  #89  
Old 03-24-2016, 06:08 PM
minor7flat5 minor7flat5 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Trenton, NJ
Posts: 4,397
Quote:
Originally Posted by EinsteinsHund View Post
Nah, though it's the Blues Brothers, the only pure Blues act in the movie is John Lee Hooker IIRC, it's mostly about Soul music.
Point taken.

I actually retyped my post a couple of times thinking about this precise distinction, then went with Blues. Nevertheless, it was really cool growing up as I realized one-by-one that the whole cast was top notch musicians.

Even the songs that weren't sung by the cast were great. For example, when the Blues Brothers get pulled over prior to driving through the mall they are listening to Sam and Dave singing "Soothe Me" on their 8-track. That's how I was introduced to Sam and Dave.

It was only recently that I found out that Steve Cropper and Donald "Duck" Dunn, featured in the movie, were session musicians for Stax records and were in the backing band for that Sam and Dave album.
  #90  
Old 03-24-2016, 08:03 PM
EinsteinsHund EinsteinsHund is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 2,067
Quote:
Originally Posted by minor7flat5 View Post
It was only recently that I found out that Steve Cropper and Donald "Duck" Dunn, featured in the movie, were session musicians for Stax records and were in the backing band for that Sam and Dave album.
They were part of the famous house band of Stax, Booker T And The Mg's, who played on almost all the Stax recordings and still had time to lay down some of the coolest and most influential instrumental music of their time on their own. They were one of the best bands in all of pop history, maybe only comparable in their special function to Motown's Funk Brothers or the Wrecking Crew, but with many albums on their own. Yeah, I love them, and I'm proud to have seen them playing live once (in '93 on the European tour with Neil Young. They played Dock Of The Bay, and Neil introduced it with: "Here's a song you might know. And there's the guy who wrote it (pointing at Steve Cropper)). A very exceptional band, also in the regard that they were a mix-raced band in the South in the early 60s with a seventeen year old black band leader.
  #91  
Old 03-24-2016, 08:14 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Shakedown Street
Posts: 12,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidm View Post
Seriously. What's with the secrecy about the movie's damned title JustinC? Just tell us already.
He won't talk about it.
  #92  
Old 03-24-2016, 09:43 PM
JustinC JustinC is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Any
Posts: 1,880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhythmdvl View Post
He won't talk about it.
The first rule..
  #93  
Old 03-25-2016, 09:36 AM
Jennshark Jennshark is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Tren'un, NJ
Posts: 2,434
Idiots getting Border Collies after seeing Babe (much like 101 Dalmations landed many Dalmations in shelters after folks figured out they're not great with kids).

Most BCs are hyper-driven, scary-smart dogs who need lots of running room and intellectual stimulation (at least mine do; they have an acre+ to run on and go to herding classes).

A lot of beautiful BCs ended up in shelters
  #94  
Old 03-25-2016, 09:41 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The land of the mouse
Posts: 43,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinC View Post
The first rule..
If we're including memes, that one too.
  #95  
Old 03-25-2016, 09:47 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennshark View Post
Idiots getting Border Collies after seeing Babe (much like 101 Dalmations landed many Dalmations in shelters after folks figured out they're not great with kids).

Most BCs are hyper-driven, scary-smart dogs who need lots of running room and intellectual stimulation (at least mine do; they have an acre+ to run on and go to herding classes).


Okay, I have to ask -- Herding Classes?


Obedience classes I can understand, but how do you teach a dog to herd? Do they get a dog yummy every time they round up another herd animal? I thought it was part of their genetic makeup.
  #96  
Old 03-25-2016, 09:55 AM
Jophiel Jophiel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Chicago suburbia
Posts: 16,626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop View Post
Plus, MTV doubled down on the popularity of grunge and gangsta rap so heavily that they stopped showing music videos altogether by the end of the 90s.
MTV got away from videos because videos were hard to sell advertising for. Unlike a 30/60 minute show, you have no "stickiness" to keep viewers for longer than a few minutes or for them not to switch channels once their song was over and/or a commercial came on. After all, it's not as though you were going to miss the plot if you didn't switch back right away -- there's always more videos. Traditional programming like Beavis & Butthead or Singled Out was a lot easier to sell adverting time since you were generally assured an audience of a specific demographic for that entire time block.

For a while, "count down" video shows held on since, again, you'd see Number Seven and want to know what Number Six is but those phased out over time as well.

Last edited by Jophiel; 03-25-2016 at 09:55 AM.
  #97  
Old 03-25-2016, 10:25 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The land of the mouse
Posts: 43,108
Not easy to get data on this, but possibly the Fifty Shades of Grey effect counts.
  #98  
Old 03-25-2016, 11:35 AM
Gray Ghost Gray Ghost is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,963
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElvisL1ves View Post
A single line in the film Sideways depressed sales of Merlot wine for years.
Which is funny, as the wine that was Miles's treasure, that he was saving for a momentous occasion and ended up drinking it, IIRC, by himself at a McDonalds is Chateau Cheval Blanc. Cheval Blanc is, most years, about 40 to 50 percent Merlot, with the remainder Cabernet Franc. And though I don't remember the line, I've read that in the movie, Miles bashes Cab Franc too.

I guess they could have made his wine a bottle of Petrus, but that might be a little too obvious.

I've thought it was a deliberate in-joke from the moment I watched the movie. Funny movie, BTW. Makes you cringe in the way that Alexander Payne's movies do so well.
  #99  
Old 03-25-2016, 12:08 PM
SaharaTea SaharaTea is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: WY
Posts: 2,438
Oliver Stone's JFK had a big impact on the passage of the JFK Records Act of 1992, which mandated that all government records relating to the assassination be stored at the National Archives and made public by 2017.

Culturally speaking the film also drove a renewed interest in the assassination and various conspiracy theories. I was an impressionable 13-year-old at the time, and the film inspired a lifelong interest in the assassination despite the fact that I no longer believe in a conspiracy.
  #100  
Old 03-25-2016, 12:26 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 24,608
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinC View Post
A certain movie may have led to people buying less shit they don't need with money they don't have.
I've never seen any evidence that Fight Club had any impact on the amount of stuff people buy, or consumerism in general. On the other hand, a bunch of people started real-life fight clubs around the country.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:46 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017