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  #101  
Old 03-25-2016, 12:34 PM
JustinC JustinC is offline
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I've never seen any evidence that Fight Club had any impact on the amount of stuff people buy, or consumerism in general. On the other hand, a bunch of people started real-life fight clubs around the country.
Are you familiar with the website http://www.zerohedge.com/? I read it for entertainment purposes only (not educational), when eating lunch. Spend enough time there and you'll see the spirit of Tyler is alive and well.
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  #102  
Old 03-25-2016, 12:41 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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OK, so that website exists. What does it have to do with any impact on the amount of stuff people buy?
  #103  
Old 03-25-2016, 12:44 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Idiots getting Border Collies after seeing Babe (much like 101 Dalmations landed many Dalmations in shelters after folks figured out they're not great with kids).

Most BCs are hyper-driven, scary-smart dogs who need lots of running room and intellectual stimulation (at least mine do; they have an acre+ to run on and go to herding classes).

A lot of beautiful BCs ended up in shelters
Cite that Dalmatians are not good with kids?

Dalmatians will get along with other pets and children if socialized as a puppy with all types of pets and people. Dalmatians can make a wonderful active playmate for children (with proper supervision to be sure that both the child and the dog are following acceptable rules for behavior).
Read more at http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/dalmat...cZuC3WTS0Lg.99

http://www.dalmatianwelfare.co.uk/living-with/children/

But yes, border collies , Australian shepherds, some huskies, etc are scary smart, and should only be got as pet after research.
  #104  
Old 03-25-2016, 01:13 PM
JustinC JustinC is offline
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OK, so that website exists. What does it have to do with any impact on the amount of stuff people buy?
Try joining up and read some threads. Use a phrase like "buying shit you don't need...etc" and you're mostly preaching to the converted. Quite a few take it further and talk about their stock of ammo and dried foods and stacks of silver, but the general level is a resistance to commercialism and the messages from the MSM.

The movie could've been a symptom of a trend away from commercialism and conspicuous consumption for most, I don't know but it was released in 1999 so I doubt it, but it may have been a catalyst for some.
  #105  
Old 03-26-2016, 02:15 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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Willie Wonka and The Chocolate Factory led to Wonka Candies. Odd, because Dahl's book was Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

The book and movie The Stepford Wives led to the adjective "stepford."
  #106  
Old 03-26-2016, 07:41 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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The Simpsons led to the adjective "cromulent."
  #107  
Old 03-27-2016, 04:51 AM
Martini Enfield Martini Enfield is offline
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I think The Matrix was responsible for a resurgence in neo-Zen philosophy stuff ("There is no spoon"), along with the idea that we're all just living in a computer simulation.

I know it wasn't the first piece of fiction with that scenario, but it's certainly the one that brought it to the forefront of popular culture.
  #108  
Old 03-27-2016, 07:32 AM
Ranchoth Ranchoth is online now
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Originally Posted by JoseB View Post
About The Day After, the Wikipedia article mentions that it influenced policymakers. Copypasting from there:

President Ronald Reagan watched the film several days before its screening, on November 5, 1983. He wrote in his diary that the film was "very effective and left me greatly depressed,"[16] and that it changed his mind on the prevailing policy on a "nuclear war".[18] The film was also screened for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A government advisor who attended the screening, a friend of Meyer's [Meyer was the director of the film], told him "If you wanted to draw blood, you did it. Those guys sat there like they were turned to stone." Four years later, the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty was signed and in Reagan's memoirs he drew a direct line from the film to the signing.[16]
...didn't the Strategic Defense Initiative, although proposed in '83, really start development around then, too?

I mean, treaties are dandy and all, but the situation—and maybe even the aftereffects from the film—might have been a bit more complicated than plowshares good, fire bad.
  #109  
Old 03-27-2016, 07:40 AM
Claverhouse Claverhouse is offline
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This is a minor thing, but I swear I never noticed anyone leaving stones or pebbles on tombs or memorials until they showed people doing that to Oskar Schindler's tomb at the end of Schindler's List. Now I see it everywhere.


It's possible that the film merely brought it to my attention, but I don't think so. I don't recall seeing it earlier, and it stood out when I saw the film simply because it was a practice I'd never seen or heard of before. I gather than leaving Memorial Stones is an old Jewish practice, but I don't think other groups did it until the film popularized the idea.

Now I see it frequently at memorials. In particular, the Holocaust Memorial in Boston invariably has stones heaped upon the granite portions.

It is most rooted in Scottish tradition, possibly for several 1000 years. Maybe they copied it from the Scots. Cairns were, rather slowly, built through singular additions. There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn". People have been adding stones --- or stanes --- all over Scotland non-stop all the time.


At 2nd Inverlochy, 1645, Montrose gave Argyll's people a very well-deserved hiding, and since every passing MacDonald must add a stone, and every Campbell --- hopefully well penitent --- must subtract one.


I would be pretty certain that all this started in the Cradle of Civilisation,the Middle East many 1000s of years ago. There are a lot of stone structures there.
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The efficiency and success of the Italian aviators in Tripoli are noteworthy, but must not be overvalued. There were no opponents in the air.

v. Bernhardi ---- Germany and the Next War
  #110  
Old 03-27-2016, 09:13 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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The Simpsons led to the adjective "cromulent."
Its usage has been embiggened since.
  #111  
Old 03-27-2016, 10:12 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn".
Didn't Nikita Krushchev say something like that?
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  #112  
Old 03-27-2016, 12:59 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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The Godfather had a big impact on the Mafia. After the movie came out, they changed from what we today would call "street thugs" and began to purposely conduct themselves in what they felt was a more dignified fashion.

http://www.theage.com.au/entertainme...913-158dl.html
I think the Godfather films were great propaganda for the Mafia ... they made them seem like honorable family men, a sort of criminal nobility, when all they've ever been were street scum with money.

Last edited by Evil Captor; 03-27-2016 at 12:59 PM.
  #113  
Old 03-28-2016, 10:34 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Originally Posted by Claverhouse View Post
It is most rooted in Scottish tradition, possibly for several 1000 years. Maybe they copied it from the Scots. Cairns were, rather slowly, built through singular additions. There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn". People have been adding stones --- or stanes --- all over Scotland non-stop all the time.


At 2nd Inverlochy, 1645, Montrose gave Argyll's people a very well-deserved hiding, and since every passing MacDonald must add a stone, and every Campbell --- hopefully well penitent --- must subtract one.


I would be pretty certain that all this started in the Cradle of Civilisation,the Middle East many 1000s of years ago. There are a lot of stone structures there.
One mountain near where I live has at least three separate cairns - all of which are built as fairly neat columns instead of rock-piles. Each is around six feet tall. They don't show up well on Google Maps or I'd post a link.
  #114  
Old 03-28-2016, 11:31 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by Claverhouse View Post
It is most rooted in Scottish tradition, possibly for several 1000 years. Maybe they copied it from the Scots. Cairns were, rather slowly, built through singular additions. There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn". People have been adding stones --- or stanes --- all over Scotland non-stop all the time.


At 2nd Inverlochy, 1645, Montrose gave Argyll's people a very well-deserved hiding, and since every passing MacDonald must add a stone, and every Campbell --- hopefully well penitent --- must subtract one.


I would be pretty certain that all this started in the Cradle of Civilisation,the Middle East many 1000s of years ago. There are a lot of stone structures there.

I'm familiar with cairns and the process of adding to them, but I maintain this modern practice of placing stones atop monuments which are already complete, and made of large dressed stones, is completely different.

With traditional cairns, the small stone you add is virtually indistinguishable from the ones making up the rest of the pile.

But this modern practice has people putting smaller stones, utterly unlike those making up the monument, atop the monument itself. They're not adding just another stone to the cairn. They're placing an extra alien element to a monument.

In that sense, putting a pebble on a monument is more like leaving, say, a tree on top of a cairn. You could say you're adding to the pile, but what you're adding ain't the same.
  #115  
Old 03-28-2016, 12:30 PM
BrassyPhrase BrassyPhrase is offline
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They were part of the famous house band of Stax, Booker T And The Mg's, who played on almost all the Stax recordings and still had time to lay down some of the coolest and most influential instrumental music of their time on their own. They were one of the best bands in all of pop history, maybe only comparable in their special function to Motown's Funk Brothers or the Wrecking Crew, but with many albums on their own. Yeah, I love them, and I'm proud to have seen them playing live once (in '93 on the European tour with Neil Young. They played Dock Of The Bay, and Neil introduced it with: "Here's a song you might know. And there's the guy who wrote it (pointing at Steve Cropper)). A very exceptional band, also in the regard that they were a mix-raced band in the South in the early 60s with a seventeen year old black band leader.
Sorry, not to hijack the thread--but if anyone gets a chance to go to the Stax museum in Memphis-GO!!!! One of the most interesting museums I've ever been to (and I love museums). I learned so much about blues, soul, gospel, the different sounds from the different studios and the history of these styles of music!
  #116  
Old 03-28-2016, 12:33 PM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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I wonder if My Cousin Vinnie lowered sales of instant grits in the South?
  #117  
Old 03-28-2016, 01:17 PM
Toxgoddess Toxgoddess is offline
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Seriously. What's with the secrecy about the movie's damned title JustinC? Just tell us already.
My guess is we are talking about Supersize Me.
  #118  
Old 03-28-2016, 01:18 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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My guess is we are talking about Supersize Me.
Fight Club.
  #119  
Old 03-28-2016, 01:19 PM
Toxgoddess Toxgoddess is offline
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My guess was we were talking about Supersize Me. Lots of people steered away from McDonald's and fast food for a while after that. We were among them.

Darn edit window. Still, sort of fits.

Last edited by Toxgoddess; 03-28-2016 at 01:19 PM.
  #120  
Old 03-28-2016, 01:46 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by Toxgoddess View Post
My guess was we were talking about Supersize Me. Lots of people steered away from McDonald's and fast food for a while after that. We were among them.

Darn edit window. Still, sort of fits.

No, he PMed me. Fight Club. Which, you dont talk about. Hence the "joke" of not giving the title.
  #121  
Old 03-31-2016, 08:02 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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Capricorn One may have started, or at least spurred on, the Moon landing hoax nonsense.
That existed before the film, but it probably did create a lot more believers.

I'm not sure which film really started the whole comic book movie boom, but I'd lay money on the first Tobey McGuire Spider-man movie. There were a few false starts before that (Superman, and Batman had some good starts, but then a few bad movies put a temporary halt to those franchises). The next year after Spider-man 3, gave us Hulk (a false start to the MCU), not too long after, we got Batman Begins, etc.
  #122  
Old 03-31-2016, 08:07 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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Originally Posted by Evil Captor View Post
I think the Godfather films were great propaganda for the Mafia ... they made them seem like honorable family men, a sort of criminal nobility, when all they've ever been were street scum with money.
And then Goodfellas spoiled all that, and overrode the image that 'The Godfather' created. /edit Sorry, just reread the premise of the thread and realized you were talking about fiction, and not non-fiction.

Another movie I just thought of -- The Lord of the Rings started the trend of film trilogies filmed back to back, and released one per year.

Last edited by Haldurson; 03-31-2016 at 08:09 AM.
  #123  
Old 03-31-2016, 01:53 PM
JustinC JustinC is offline
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Originally Posted by Toxgoddess View Post
My guess was we were talking about Supersize Me. Lots of people steered away from McDonald's and fast food for a while after that. We were among them.

Darn edit window. Still, sort of fits.
Actually that definitely fits the thread, I imagine Supersize Me at the least reinforced the healthy ideals in a great many people and introduced them to others. As a 'foodie' before I saw the film, I only visited McDonald's when absolutely necessary; twice a year at most. I usually felt ill afterwords although the coffee became a lot better around 2006/7.

I will show Supersize Me once to most of the classes I teach, with subtitles as I teach in developing countries. I remember back in the 80's when McDonald's came to the UK and no-one openly questioned whether it was good food or not until the early 2000's. My family never visited together, as cooking at home is cheaper and my parents' business was catering. Back in 2006 I was in China and went in to a McDonald's for a coffee (and to check out how it was there) and they had fucking high chairs with mothers feeding their toddlers fries. I couldn't stay and left angrily, ranting at any of my Chinese colleagues who would listen.

The local Chinese restaurants, run by families, were full of fresh food, cooked very well, and tasted wonderful - much better than a Chinese restaurant outside of China. McDonald's was a 'treat' among my Chinese colleagues, KFC was upmarket and Pizza Hut was eaten with a knife and fork, and the one time I went, I and my colleague were brought to the front of the queue by the door staff and sat in the window - me being the only laowai (foreigner) in the restaurant.

This was in Wuhan where the local food was very fresh (it's in Hubei province which has more surface water, lakes, rivers etc. than anywhere else in China), cooked well as I only visited Chinese restaurants for Chinese people - often having to guess what to eat as there were no pictures and I can't read Chinese - and it's in roughly the centre of China so has influences from everywhere. Unfortunately other than food Wuhan had no redeeming qualities.
  #124  
Old 03-31-2016, 02:00 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by Haldurson View Post
That existed before the film, but it probably did create a lot more believers.

.

Are you quite certain of that? If so, I'd like to see a cite. I myself did not hear any significant conspiracy "movement" about Moon Landing Hoax until well after Capricorn One came out. I suspect myself that the movie significantly contributed to the belief.


(There are some people who seem to think the "Moon Landing Simulator" scenes in the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds are Forever represent a depiction of such a Moon Landing Hoax. But there's no suggestion of it in the film. I was around then, and saw the film when it first came out. There's no implication that this is anything but a practice run or simulation. And I don't recall people talking about such Faked Moon Landings at the time, either. )
  #125  
Old 03-31-2016, 09:51 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Here's a history of moon landing conspiracy theories:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_l...iracy_theories

The first book making the claim that it was a hoax was in 1974. In 1977 a Hare Krishna magazine made the claim that it was a hoax. In the 1970's it was common for people in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to believe that it was a hoax. This may have been because Cuba was sending teachers abroad that told them it was so. It was probably more common in third world countries than in the U.S. at that point. Right up to today there are people who believe it. I think that the claim started shortly after the moon landing and grew slowly for decades. Capricorn One was only one part of the popularity of the theory.
  #126  
Old 03-31-2016, 09:52 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Can anyone find a link to the results of polls over a long period asking people if they believe in the theory?
  #127  
Old 04-01-2016, 07:05 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
Here's a history of moon landing conspiracy theories:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_l...iracy_theories

The first book making the claim that it was a hoax was in 1974. In 1977 a Hare Krishna magazine made the claim that it was a hoax. In the 1970's it was common for people in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to believe that it was a hoax. This may have been because Cuba was sending teachers abroad that told them it was so. It was probably more common in third world countries than in the U.S. at that point. Right up to today there are people who believe it. I think that the claim started shortly after the moon landing and grew slowly for decades. Capricorn One was only one part of the popularity of the theory.
I don't doubt that there were people claiming it in 1974 -- there are people who will believe and make up just about any conspiracy theory. The question is whether it was widely believed before Capricorn One in 1978. I certainly don't recall anything like the widespread attraction of the theory back before that film, or even for some time afterwards.

Note that the first book about it being in 1974 sort of undercuts the suggestion (made in The Big Book of Conspiracies ) that the scene in the 1971 movie Diamonds are Forever was intended to be a depiction of the Moon Landing Hoax in action.

I've checked the Google Ngram viewer, but it doesn't seem to help in finding any references to the Moon Landing Hoax (or similar words). Google Books hasn't picked up anything before the late 1990s.

Last edited by CalMeacham; 04-01-2016 at 07:06 AM.
  #128  
Old 04-01-2016, 08:28 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is online now
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I'm not sure which film really started the whole comic book movie boom, but I'd lay money on the first Tobey McGuire Spider-man movie. There were a few false starts before that (Superman, and Batman had some good starts, but then a few bad movies put a temporary halt to those franchises).
X-MEN -- with Oscar-caliber actors, yellow-spandex joke, and Stan Lee cameo -- had already been a big enough hit as to get a franchise-tastic sequel greenlit well before Tobey Maguire's first outing as Spidey hit theaters, doing wonders for Hugh Jackman's career and not so much for James Marsden.
  #129  
Old 04-01-2016, 08:41 AM
jsquire jsquire is offline
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Willie Wonka and The Chocolate Factory led to Wonka Candies. Odd, because Dahl's book was Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
It's the other way around. The film was financed by Breaker Confections, then a subsidiary of Quaker Oats and now owned by Nestle, which was renamed the Willy Wonka Candy Company just before the film's release. This tie-in was the reason the title changed. IMHO, the film was a far better product than the Wonka Bar it promoted.
  #130  
Old 04-01-2016, 09:21 AM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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Caractacus Potts in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang invented Toot Sweets, the candy whistles. But you can get your own.

Tout de suite, get it?

Last edited by ElvisL1ves; 04-01-2016 at 09:22 AM.
  #131  
Old 04-08-2016, 12:01 AM
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One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest -- Novel by Ken Kesey (1962), and the movie (1975) starring Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher.

The popular rebellion against forced institutionalization in mental hospitals, and against the degrading institutional treatment and forced medications and electroshock treatments, was already a growing movement, I believe. The book and the movie further planted the distrust of mental institutions in the public mind, and I think was instrumental in the movement towards de-institutionalizing the mentally ill.
"One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" described a model that was already receding into the past in the 50's, even before the introduction of first-generation anti-psychotics emptied out the institutions characterised by the movie.

I'm too young to remember what effect the movie had on public perceptions, but de-institutionalisation was certainly driven by cost-cutting, and was happening regardless of perception.
  #132  
Old 04-08-2016, 12:55 AM
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This is a minor thing, but I swear I never noticed anyone leaving stones or pebbles on tombs or memorials until they showed people doing that to Oskar Schindler's tomb at the end of Schindler's List. Now I see it everywhere.

It's possible that the film merely brought it to my attention, but I don't think so. I don't recall seeing it earlier, and it stood out when I saw the film simply because it was a practice I'd never seen or heard of before. I gather than leaving Memorial Stones is an old Jewish practice, but I don't think other groups did it until the film popularized the idea.
The Cadet I knew at West Point knew that people did it for the grave of David Marcus, "as a mark of respect", but thought it had nothing to do with his faith/culture.
  #133  
Old 04-09-2016, 04:51 PM
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I don't see Patton mentioned yet. Richard Nixon's favorite movie.

Nixon watched Patton for the 6th time and the next day decided to invade Cambodia. Which lead to the war spreading deep into Cambodia, Pol Pot and the evil that came with that.
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