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  #51  
Old 05-27-2016, 09:52 PM
Balance Balance is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleRojelio View Post
backsplash instead of backslash
I use a couple of nonstandard punctuation terms. A question mark is a "quizzer". That makes the "?!" construction a "quizbang", harkening back to the Old Hackish use of "bang" to refer to an exclamation point.
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  #52  
Old 05-28-2016, 09:47 PM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
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I always call the mechanism that defogs the rear window of my car the "rear window defoggeter' or just "the defoggeter" for short.

I use " embiggen" for the act of spreading my fingers on my tablet, laptop or phone to make the text/picture bigger. I am sure non-Simpson fans think I am just flat crazy.
  #53  
Old 05-28-2016, 10:11 PM
MissTake MissTake is offline
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Horsepital for hospital
Worstershireshyershewer schaush for worstershire sauce
Toxic Hell for Taco Bell
Hickeypups for hiccups
We're also a cimmanon for cinnamon
Maroon for moron
Living in the land of Tar-jey, we often imitate the SNL Target lady: "Erw, lewk! Yer fernd er gert derl!" Dinner may be hermbergers, terters, ern serlid.
  #54  
Old 05-29-2016, 05:59 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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Some mornings, I start my day with brekkis. On other days, I prefer brefftist.

Either way, when I'm doing the cooking, I want to make sure before I start that I have all the ingrediments. Epecially on major holidays like Valleytimes Day and Crimpmuff.
  #55  
Old 05-29-2016, 06:15 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
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If you've visited the MMP, you'll know that we're fond of adding "age" to nounify verbs. For example, to say that you've finished cutting the grass, you would say "Mowage has been accomplished." Simple and to the point.
  #56  
Old 05-29-2016, 10:23 AM
ASGuy ASGuy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balance View Post
... That makes the "?!" construction a "quizbang", harkening back to the Old Hackish use of "bang" to refer to an exclamation point.
Minor hijack. In the old days of hot metal printing we printers called an exclamation point a bang. It's my understanding that newspaper folks do as well. [\hijack]
  #57  
Old 05-31-2016, 04:56 AM
Annoying Buzz Annoying Buzz is offline
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Words or spellings they use in the UK, but not the US, are Britishisisms (after a co-worker who absolutely could not pronounce it correctly).

Those French pancake-like pastries filled with meat or sweets, are creepies.
  #58  
Old 05-31-2016, 05:26 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by Annoying Buzz View Post
Those French pancake-like pastries filled with meat or sweets, are creepies.
Just wanted to say, made correctly, sweet or savory crêpes are nothing akin to pancakes.
  #59  
Old 05-31-2016, 07:15 AM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Totenfeier View Post
And around our house, two stores are known as tar-ZHAY and ZHAY-CEE-pee-NAY.
As someone who spent way too many years working at Target, this drove me absolutely insane. Everyone and their mother would say it that way to me as a cashier and I just hated them so much for it.
  #60  
Old 05-31-2016, 10:07 AM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Originally Posted by Sir T-Cups View Post
As someone who spent way too many years working at Target, this drove me absolutely insane. Everyone and their mother would say it that way to me as a cashier and I just hated them so much for it.
I blame Oprah.
  #61  
Old 05-31-2016, 01:01 PM
Balance Balance is offline
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Originally Posted by Cub Mistress View Post
I use " embiggen" for the act of spreading my fingers on my tablet, laptop or phone to make the text/picture bigger. I am sure non-Simpson fans think I am just flat crazy.
That quote has so thoroughly saturated internet culture that most of us non-fans wouldn't even blink at the term.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
If you've visited the MMP, you'll know that we're fond of adding "age" to nounify verbs. For example, to say that you've finished cutting the grass, you would say "Mowage has been accomplished." Simple and to the point.
This usage pops up in groups of software geeks sometimes, too. Of course, being geeks, we're known to reverse the polarity on it as well. One guy I knew liked to use "Foodage?" to mean "Want to go find something to eat?" I think he liked the parallel to "forage", since engineers never know where they're going for lunch.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASGuy View Post
Minor hijack. In the old days of hot metal printing we printers called an exclamation point a bang. It's my understanding that newspaper folks do as well. [\hijack]
That's probably where hackers got it, maybe via teletype nomenclature.
  #62  
Old 06-01-2016, 07:29 AM
TheseGoToEleven TheseGoToEleven is offline
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TV-isms

There's an example right there: TV-isms.

And they way pre-date The Simpsons, as in "What a maroon" for moron, and "Lucy, you
have some 'splaining to do". No 'splanation needed.

Sammitch for sandwich is a favorite, and I've even heard it on a commercial (I forget which).
  #63  
Old 06-01-2016, 09:08 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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Infinite

When I was in college, I noticed that nearly all of the students there used the word "Infinite" to mean something big, long, or innumerous but not necessarily infinite, and I picked up the habit. "The trip was infinite". Trust me -- this was Caltech, so they knew the actual meaning. They simply liked saying it.

Even the professors used it for some things -- we had "Infinite time exams", meaning that there was no time limit. But obviously, the exams had to be turned in by a certain day and time. And God help you if you got one of those exams, because they had a reputation of driving students into obsessoin to the point that people would show up to a meal wearing signs that said, effectively: "Don't bother me -- I'm taking an exam right now".

Last edited by Haldurson; 06-01-2016 at 09:09 AM.
  #64  
Old 06-01-2016, 11:03 AM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is online now
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Today just happens to be the oneth (pronounced wunth) of June. Tomorrow will of course be the twoth (pronounce tooth).

I like to use the construction "much of a..." (from Alice in Wonderland's "much of a muchness") when discussing the weather:

heat = much of a hotness
cold = much of a coldness
rain = much of a wetness

Elephants are heffalumps, from Winnie the Pooh.

Breakfast is breakfee (pronounced brekfee).

The dustpan is the sweepee (my father derived that from broom = sweeper, dustpan = sweepee).

For no reason I can think of, oatmeal = goatmeal (I sometimes even say to myself, "Goatmeal, made from real goats!")

Probably a genuine error, but the other day in the train station, I overheard a woman explaining that she had a "congenial heart defect" and had a scar to show for it. Several people around her started discreetly cracking up.
  #65  
Old 06-01-2016, 12:36 PM
Why Child Why Child is offline
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For almost 3 decades now, I've been using my "word," ... " lunacidal" to describe a homicidal lunatic, or someone who wants to kills lunatics, either way, really. As in - "Please don't mess with me today, I am feeling downright lunacidal!!"

When my cat complains at me in a plaintive yowl, I tell her to stop being "complaintive." I've used it a couple of times on children, too.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs Fairway View Post
I think all of mine come from my sister's kids.

Hankaburger for hamburger
Frijafator for refrigerator
<snip>
Now, that's funny!! My dad always said, "Hangaburger," and "Frijatator." I thought I learned it from him, but now I understand we might have taught it to him!!
  #66  
Old 06-01-2016, 01:26 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
"Ohh-h-h--h-h, I made a fox's paw !"

Refrigigator.

Posspickles.
Re: Fox paws
I read words phonetically. For years I thought that was the way it was pronounced.
"Wehawken" Star shaped crack in the windshield.
"Dinglepull" Ornate door handle on cabinet.
"Gerundell" Ornate Victorian style candle with long thin crystals hanging from it. I still don't know what they're really called.
  #67  
Old 06-01-2016, 01:36 PM
mbh mbh is offline
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Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
If you've visited the MMP, you'll know that we're fond of adding "age" to nounify verbs. For example, to say that you've finished cutting the grass, you would say "Mowage has been accomplished." Simple and to the point.
Before going shopping, I check to see if I have enough buckage.

"Horse-pistol" for hospital is pretty common.

I occasionally use science fiction profanity. "Frack" and "felgercarb" from Battlestar Galactica, "frell" from Farscape, "tanj" from Larry Niven's books.
  #68  
Old 06-01-2016, 02:53 PM
Toxgoddess Toxgoddess is offline
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"Balcobene" for balcony, from a young niece who didn't quite know the right word. We liked hers better.

The car named after the African antelope is an Imp-ala, accent on the first syllable. Just because it's more fun to say it that way.
  #69  
Old 06-01-2016, 03:56 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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My wife and I got into the habit of making words of nouns suffixed with -age. You know, analogous to linkage, outage, frontage. So we would ask each other questions like "Hoe much ice-creamage do we need to supply?" Or, "How much beachage should our hotel have?"

Much later, watching a White Sox game on TV, I heard whimsical announcer Tom Paciorek doing the same thing, talking about a ball having too much bounce-age.
  #70  
Old 06-01-2016, 04:34 PM
Omar Little Omar Little is offline
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Originally Posted by GinoC View Post
cromulent wasn't a real word.
Looks like she may have the last laugh now: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/cromulent
  #71  
Old 06-01-2016, 05:02 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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I think I learned from Fractured Fairy Tales that a dustpan is called a gride, as in "gride and broom."
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  #72  
Old 06-01-2016, 08:38 PM
martin.smith martin.smith is offline
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[QUOTE=Dante G;19357171]Just for fun, are there any words you have made up? Or any words you use that are real words, but you use them intentionally wrong?

For me, I use the real word "flibbertigibbet". I use it as a substitute for "F***". Screw up on something, or something goes wrong at work - "FLIBBERTIGIBBET!"[/QUOTE

Last edited by martin.smith; 06-01-2016 at 08:39 PM.
  #73  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:48 AM
Pliam Pliam is offline
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I have always felt that uniformity is something the language lacked. For instance, evade has evasion, why can't avoid have avoision?
  #74  
Old 06-02-2016, 10:50 AM
greenmario greenmario is offline
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In my circle that feeling when you eat too much and get sick is being 'discomfortable'
  #75  
Old 06-02-2016, 12:56 PM
curious11 curious11 is offline
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Combobulate

Combobulate is a useful word.

Hangaburger over here.

Brefest over here also.

Butto (for butter) from my daughter.

Lunk for lunch

Cheese and Crackers (for swearing. It stopped when my kids gave me cheese and crackers for Fathers Day in 2013). Now I say "Oh Man!"

"Good One" when someone sneezes (cause there is no G_d -> no soul -> no bad spirits, etc...).
  #76  
Old 06-02-2016, 02:37 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
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If déjà vu is the feeling you've been here before, then vu-ja day is the feeling you've never ever been here before in your entire life.
  #77  
Old 06-02-2016, 02:51 PM
Martian Bigfoot Martian Bigfoot is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
If déjà vu is the feeling you've been here before, then vu-ja day is the feeling you've never ever been here before in your entire life.
Do you mean the way an object, place or situation can feel unfamiliar, even though you know that it should be familiar? Like, you're in a house that you've been in before, and that you recognize, but it still feels like you're there for the first time? Or a person that you know suddenly feels like a stranger?

That's jamais vu.
  #78  
Old 06-02-2016, 03:23 PM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is online now
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Originally Posted by curious11 View Post
Cheese and Crackers (for swearing. It stopped when my kids gave me cheese and crackers for Fathers Day in 2013). Now I say "Oh Man!"
In the hopes that they will give you a man for father's Day 2016?

I think I'd start saying "Oh, hundred million dollars!".

Last edited by Doctor Jackson; 06-02-2016 at 03:23 PM.
  #79  
Old 06-02-2016, 04:14 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balance View Post
I use a couple of nonstandard punctuation terms. A question mark is a "quizzer". That makes the "?!" construction a "quizbang", harkening back to the Old Hackish use of "bang" to refer to an exclamation point.
Much like Victor Borge's fanciful punctuation sounds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dante G View Post
For me, I use the real word "flibbertigibbet". I use it as a substitute for "F***". Screw up on something, or something goes wrong at work - "FLIBBERTIGIBBET!"
Although it may not be the first use, that word always reminds me of The Sound of Music.
Quote:
How do you solve a problem like Maria?
How do you catch a cloud and pin it down?
How do you find the word that means Maria?
A flibbertijibbet! A will-o'-the wisp! A clown!
  #80  
Old 06-02-2016, 04:32 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
If déjà vu is the feeling you've been here before, then vu-ja day is the feeling you've never ever been here before in your entire life.
There's actually a word for that: jamais vu (literally, never seen) and it's a real thing. But I like your version . I actually had a sort of jarring instance of that recently - there's a road I travel hundreds of times a year to get to the highway. It was late afternoon, there'd been a storm, the road was uncharacteristically untrafficked, and the cloud formation was very low and dense off to my left - all in all giving me the impression that I was in another place entirely (it looked like there was a mountain range a few miles away). It was pretty bizarre until I got another few blocks and there were more major landmarks just before the highway. Kinda creeped me out, it did....

For us, just a couple I can think of offhand though I know there are more.

Deja Vid: when you turn the TV on, it happens to be showing an episode of a show you've watched maybe once in your life - and it's that same one episode on reruns.

explodiate (from a late co-worker) - something that blows up and makes a big mess, e.g. "I tried to cook a potato in the microwave and it explodiated all over the inside".

food tax (when one person is eating a snack and you reach over their shoulder and filch a bite of it). Obviously this works better with, say, a bowl of popcorn than with a slice of pizza.

Noranges, napples and mice cream (I think I'll have a norange, or maybe a napple, heck, I'll have some mice cream instead). Mice cream is also known as throat medicine here. If my husband and I are working on a grocery list, we'll even say "Get a dozen noranges".

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 06-02-2016 at 04:36 PM.
  #81  
Old 06-02-2016, 05:39 PM
Kropotkin Kropotkin is offline
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At restaurants my kid bother [sic!] liked to tell servers to "please give my excrements to the chef for his oblivious good taste."

Abyssinia? Well, you go Uruguay and I'll go mine....
  #82  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:11 PM
Balance Balance is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Noranges, napples and mice cream (I think I'll have a norange, or maybe a napple, heck, I'll have some mice cream instead). Mice cream is also known as throat medicine here. If my husband and I are working on a grocery list, we'll even say "Get a dozen noranges".
No snausages?
  #83  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:25 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
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Re jamais vu: I KNOW there's a word for it. Mine is a "made-up-word" and "a-word-I-use-wrong-for-fun" as per the thread title.

day-jah-voo <--> voo-jah-day

Get it?
  #84  
Old 06-02-2016, 08:24 PM
The Stainless Steel Rat The Stainless Steel Rat is online now
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If I am P.O.'ed about something but not enough to cuss at it, I say "Rashkamakov" and then go about my business.

I have taken to using the MMP workweek phrases:

Moanday
2Day
Hump Day
Thorsday
Firday
  #85  
Old 06-02-2016, 08:35 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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The electronics tool that shows waveforms? That's a sillyscope.
  #86  
Old 06-02-2016, 08:43 PM
Martian Bigfoot Martian Bigfoot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Re jamais vu: I KNOW there's a word for it. Mine is a "made-up-word" and "a-word-I-use-wrong-for-fun" as per the thread title.
Well, now everyone else also knows about the term jamais vu. We're being educational. And those of us who knew it already got to show off. So it's all good, see?
  #87  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:24 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
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Originally Posted by Martian Bigfoot View Post
... And those of us who knew it already got to show off. ...
I got that part.
  #88  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:28 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
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What a wonderful thread. Such a refreshing change from the "words and phrases that make me unaccountably apopleptic" threads that always get hundreds of posts.

When I was a kid I couldn't fathom how "specific" apparently had connotations of being kind of small, but the Specific Ocean was the biggest one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GinoC View Post
My daughter was in her mid-teens before she realized cromulent wasn't a real word. She was a bit miffed at her parents.
By now - sure it's a real word! It must have been around a lot longer than some of the tech-derived words, and I don't think it's going away.

Did you know chortle was invented by Lewis Carrol in Through The Looking Glass?

He also coined the expression for the kind of word that he liked to invent, portmanteau word. A portmanteau is (or was) a kind of suitcase that opens into two sections.
Thus chortle = chuckle+snort; slithy = lithe & slimy.
A modern portmanteau is glamping for glamorous camping.

I wish a lot of the other words he invented for Jabberwocky would become more popular, too. I think my favorite is frumious, best spoken with a parody of an upper class (British) English accent with a speech impediment where the "r" comes out as a "w".

Last edited by Riemann; 06-02-2016 at 09:32 PM.
  #89  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:47 PM
Martian Bigfoot Martian Bigfoot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I got that part.
Well, now you're making it sound like a bad thing.
  #90  
Old 06-03-2016, 05:54 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Grandma came to visit.

She took the train as far as the local station, then I was centimeter.
  #91  
Old 06-03-2016, 03:04 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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Re: norange

In Spanish, it does start with an "n", naranja.
  #92  
Old 06-04-2016, 06:10 AM
Iceraptoress Iceraptoress is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTake View Post
Worstershireshyershewer schaush for worstershire sauce
We have one for Worstershire sauce too = Worster-shishter-shire Sauce. And you have to kind of sing it when you say it.
  #93  
Old 06-04-2016, 03:47 PM
eburacum45 eburacum45 is online now
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The television remote. No proper name for it (remote?- nah.)
We called it the 'thing' (where's the thing? You know- the thing!)
until my daughter started calling it the 'Dingwa'.
Now it's always the Dingwa.
  #94  
Old 06-06-2016, 06:09 PM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Automagically

Used for a process which proceeds dependably on its own, but is complex enough to not be obvious as to how it works.

Drives my wife nuts when I use it.
  #95  
Old 06-10-2016, 10:08 AM
CelticKnot CelticKnot is offline
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New word

I was trying to ask a question and jumbled up "brilliant person" and "idiot" and came up with a new word.

Brillianite: n. idiot, (sarcastic) brilliant person; From brilliant + -ite (adherent); to be used in a rhetorical question: What brillianite though up (insert bad/annoying idea here)?
  #96  
Old 06-10-2016, 12:29 PM
Philliam Philliam is offline
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As an early reader (newspapers and magazines by age 5) several word threw me for a loop:

'Misled' was pronounced missile-d in my head and seemed to be like when you scratch your head in confusion.
'Molesters' From the old 'back of the magazine' pepper spray ads was pronounced mole-sters (as they obviously were some kind of creepy underground gangsters preying on people).

Both of these are now current, at least in family conversations.
  #97  
Old 06-10-2016, 12:39 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philliam View Post
'Molesters' From the old 'back of the magazine' pepper spray ads was pronounced mole-sters (as they obviously were some kind of creepy underground gangsters preying on people).
This brings to mind Tobias Funke's portmanteau of analyst and therapist - his business card described him as an Analrapist.
  #98  
Old 06-10-2016, 04:58 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philliam View Post
'Molesters' From the old 'back of the magazine' pepper spray ads was pronounced mole-sters (as they obviously were some kind of creepy underground gangsters preying on people).
This was further confused by Molester Mole, a character in Walt Kelly's Pogo comic strip.
  #99  
Old 06-14-2016, 04:44 AM
Annoying Buzz Annoying Buzz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliam View Post
I have always felt that uniformity is something the language lacked. For instance, evade has evasion, why can't avoid have avoision?
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/avoision
  #100  
Old 06-14-2016, 05:06 AM
Oglomott Oglomott is offline
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Butter = butt butt
ham = hammus alabamus
dry cat food = kibbles
refrigerator = fidggytator
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