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Old 08-30-2017, 02:22 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Khadaji's Whatcha Readin' thread -- September 2017 Edition

Is it Autumn yet? Dopers in the Houston Texas area, be safe! The rest of us, if you can afford it, donate to help organizations, please.

So what are we reading?



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Khadaji was one of the earlier members of the SDMB, and he was well-known as a kindly person who always had something encouraging to say, particularly in the self-improvement threads. He was also a voracious, omnivorous reader, and he started these monthly book threads. Sadly, he passed away in January 2013, and we decided to rename these monthly threads in his honor.

Last edited by DZedNConfused; 08-30-2017 at 02:22 PM.
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Old 08-30-2017, 02:23 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Last month's thread: Dog days of August
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Old 08-31-2017, 07:28 AM
Meurglys Meurglys is online now
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Following Brian Aldiss' recent death, I've started reading The Shape of Further Things, which is a diary/musings he wrote over January 1969 about all sorts of things.
I was looking through the books of his I owned, thinking it might be appropriate to finally read the Helliconia books, when I came across it - my partner must have bought it decades ago before we merged our collections, but she hadn't read it either!
____

'Earth is charged with a beauty we are destroying...' So begins this unique book, in which joy and doom intermingle. It spans one month in the life of Aldiss and his wife Margaret and family, living in the peaceful Oxfordshire countryside. Here's a tapestry of provocative meditations, theories of dreams, of the Moon as real estate, and the role of technology and pollution in our lives - all served up with soup and sausage rolls. Aldiss speaks of 'The sheer delight of being alive' - and captures that delight here.
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:36 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is online now
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Getting close to finishing Washington: A Life, by Ron Chernow. About 140 pages or so left.
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:22 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Dung Beetle, Grrlbrarian!

TWELVE days and counting until the new Lockwood & Co book is released!

I'm giddy with excitement....
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:24 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Following Brian Aldiss' recent death, I've started reading The Shape of Further Things, which is a diary/musings he wrote over January 1969 about all sorts of things.
I was looking through the books of his I owned, thinking it might be appropriate to finally read the Helliconia books, when I came across it - my partner must have bought it decades ago before we merged our collections, but she hadn't read it either!
____
I read Helliconia Summer and Winter when I was in my late teens. They weren't what I expected but Winter has stuck with me for 30+ years.
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:26 PM
RunSilent RunSilent is offline
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I am about a third of the way through LOSTBOY: the True Story of Captain Hook, by Christina Henry... intriguing!
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Old 09-01-2017, 04:23 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Dung Beetle, Grrlbrarian!

TWELVE days and counting until the new Lockwood & Co book is released!

I'm giddy with excitement....
I know...it's better than Christmas.

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I am about a third of the way through LOSTBOY: the True Story of Captain Hook, by Christina Henry... intriguing!
If you like that, you might also enjoy Never After, by Dan Elconin. The original Peter Pan didn't click much for me, but I've really grooved on some books that used it as inspiration.
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Old 09-01-2017, 04:42 PM
RunSilent RunSilent is offline
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I know...it's better than Christmas.


If you like that, you might also enjoy Never After, by Dan Elconin. The original Peter Pan didn't click much for me, but I've really grooved on some books that used it as inspiration.
Thanks, I will check it out.
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Old 09-01-2017, 05:37 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Thanks for the kick in the pants. I've got Dennis LeHane Since We Fell and Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz from the library and need to apply myself this weekend! It's nice and cold so curling up in bed with a book will be no problem.
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:09 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Thanks for the kick in the pants. I've got Dennis LeHane Since We Fell and Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz from the library and need to apply myself this weekend! It's nice and cold so curling up in bed with a book will be no problem.
What is cold? been 96F here and looking to stay that way for awhile
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:12 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Speaking of Lockwood & Co, this was in my email:

Hello,

We now have delivery date(s) for the order you placed on May 19, 2017

Stroud, Jonathan "Lockwood & Co., Book Five The Empty Grave"
Estimated arrival date: September 18, 2017 - September 22, 2017

YES!!!
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Old 09-02-2017, 10:13 AM
Quimby Quimby is offline
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I'm reading But What If We're Wrong? by Chuck Klosterman. It's about about what Culture survives long term and how it is almost impossible to predict because current values and future values differ so much. It's really fascinating and I have been thinking of starting a few discussion threads here based on stuff he brings up in the book.
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Old 09-02-2017, 02:00 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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I finished Fallon's Jewel by Sidonia Guillone. It's a m/m romance that's part space opera an part epic. Unfortunately she should have stuck to it being all space opera, that half of the book was a fun read and more forgiving of the less than stellar writing.
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Old 09-02-2017, 03:54 PM
CelticKnot CelticKnot is offline
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While I know e-books are not as good as real books, there is an advantage to them. I can reserve them as soon as they are announced and if I was first, I get first crack at them when they are released. I started Y is for Yesterday as soon as I finished the last book I was reading.
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Old 09-03-2017, 04:48 PM
janis_and_c0 janis_and_c0 is offline
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I just finished a memoir called Die Young with Me by Rob Rufus. I really really liked this book.
  #17  
Old 09-04-2017, 02:41 PM
Grrlbrarian Grrlbrarian is offline
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Dung Beetle, Grrlbrarian!

TWELVE days and counting until the new Lockwood & Co book is released!

I'm giddy with excitement....
Giddy here as well! EIGHT DAYS. I CAN WAIT EIGHT DAYS. (I think)
  #18  
Old 09-04-2017, 07:55 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is online now
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Just finished Sleeping with the Fishes, by Mary Janice Davidson, which I enjoyed. Next up: You're Not Fooling Anyone When You Take Your Laptop to a Coffee Shop: Scalzi on Writing, by John Scalzi.
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:29 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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You're Not Fooling Anyone When You Take Your Laptop to a Coffee Shop: Scalzi on Writing, by John Scalzi.
I'm not? Boy is our NaNo group going to be disappointed.
  #20  
Old 09-04-2017, 11:17 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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I gave up on Ed Lin's Ghost Month, a mystery novel about a glum street vendor in Taiwan who looks into the unsolved murder of his ex-girlfriend, after my customary 50 pages (or the equivalent, since I was listening to an audiobook). Plodding and dull.

I'm a few chapters into rereading Frank Herbert's sf classic Dune, which isn't as well-written as I remember from when I last read it in high school (no surprise there), although its world-building is still terrific. I'm also reading Education in Violence by Francis F. McKinney, a biography of a Civil War hero of mine, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, "the Rock of Chickamauga." A rather stolid personality but a talented and courageous soldier.

Also just about halfway through David McCullough's first book, The Johnstown Flood. The tension of the events leading up to the May 1889 dam break was thick enough to cut with a knife, and now the tales of death and survival in Johnstown are pretty gripping.

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Getting close to finishing Washington: A Life, by Ron Chernow. About 140 pages or so left.
Great bio. Hope you're digging it!
  #21  
Old 09-05-2017, 01:26 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is online now
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Getting close to finishing Washington: A Life, by Ron Chernow. About 140 pages or so left.
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Also just about halfway through David McCullough's first book, The Johnstown Flood. The tension of the events leading up to the May 1889 dam break was thick enough to cut with a knife, and now the tales of death and survival in Johnstown are pretty gripping.

Great bio. Hope you're digging it!
Oh, I am. I didn't get a chance to read as much as I wanted to this holiday weekend though but will finish it this week. It's great.

As for The Johnstown Flood, that one was good too. That may have been my first McCullough, not sure. That or John Adams. I recall at the end of Flood, he mentions someone who had been presumed dead showing back up years and years later. He'd taken advantage of the flood to disappear and start a whole new life elsewhere under a new name and everything. I guess that would not be possible now, what with computer databases and fingerprinting and such.
  #22  
Old 09-05-2017, 11:44 AM
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I'm reading "Against a Dark Background" by Iain M. Banks. His books are very highly regarded in the SF community, but I read "Consider Phlebas" a number of years back and remember nothing about it except that it was somewhat unpleasant and left me feeling "meh" about the experience. But I found this one at a book sale so figured why not?

The basic plot is that Sharrow, a retired antiquities hunter, has had a contract put on her by a community of monks and will be killed unless she retrieves a rare artifact. In the context of the book, artifacts are items of great cultural or technological significance developed by previous civilizations on the planet over the course of 6000 years of settlement. In this case, the MacGuffin is a "lazy gun"; a weapon with a sense of humor that apparently manipulates probability to do its dirty work.

So this is basically a "heist" book -- Sharrow gets the team back together and they try to retrieve the artifact before the contract (and Sharrow) can be executed. As in most heist-fiction, there's a mysterious adversary that's always one or two steps ahead of them. We don't know who it is. It could be a stranger, or Sharrow's deranged and jealous sister, or her obsessed cousin. Or maybe one of her crew? I haven't finished the book yet, so I dunno.

World building: good, but occasionally too much travelogue.
Character building: Mostly good, except that we don't actually end up liking any of them. In particular, Sharrow is somewhat amoral, not particularly likeable (or unlikeable) and, aside from not wanting to die, seems emotionally distant from just about everything. So, it's a bit hard to care one way or another which way the plot goes.

Still, liking this more than Consider Phlebas, and I wouldn't object too much if another Banks book fell into my lap.

Note: Still working on "Dream of Scipio" from last month. As I predicted, it's becoming harder to pick that one up as my interest fades.
  #23  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:29 PM
The wind of my soul The wind of my soul is offline
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I finished two lovely books over the long weekend.

Fangirl follows an awkward, anxious girl through her first year of college. I don't think many books take place in college, but the setting made for a cool reading experience. Every location that was mentioned in the book (dorm room, for example, or the dining hall or the library), I was picturing the book taking place on my college campus, and that was fun. The book was nicely written, the sort of book that's story-driven and doesn't waste too much time waxing poetic.

The other book I finished is Mara Wilson's Where Am I Now?. Mara Wilson comes across as so likeable. I've read other celebrity memoirs before, and often, celebrities try so hard to come across as intelligent and gracious and relatable that they miss the mark, and wind up just coming across as trying too hard. Mara is open about her struggles and insecurities, and her essays are insightful. One thing that surprised me was how few duds were in this collection. I have read some essay collections from famous writers -- think Ann Patchett and Barbara Kingsolver. Most essay collections (or short story collections) contain a few duds, and are successful because of the strength of the stronger pieces in this collection. But I think I was 80% of the way through this book before I found an essay that I would consider a dud. Her writing was consistently engaging. After coming in with admittedly low expectation (because come on, it's written by a celebrity who became famous for her acting, not her writing), I was impressed.
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Old 09-05-2017, 12:54 PM
Misnomer Misnomer is offline
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I am still lurking in these threads, but I'm not posting (much) because I'm not reading anything other than my usual legal/criminal thrillers. I just got caught up on David Baldacci's Will Robie series (the new book comes out in November), and I had a Mickey Haller book already purchased and downloaded on my Kindle so I dove back into that series over the weekend (I have a feeling I was working my way through the Haller books when I learned about the new Robie book).

If I read anything interesting, I'll definitely let you guys know. In the meantime, I'm enjoying your posts!
  #25  
Old 09-05-2017, 03:58 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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What is cold? been 96F here and looking to stay that way for awhile
Yeah, it got warmer. When I wrote that, it was getting down to the 40s at night.
  #26  
Old 09-05-2017, 04:00 PM
peedin peedin is offline
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I read The Woman in Cabin 10 over the weekend. Don't bother.
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:23 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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...he mentions someone who had been presumed dead showing back up years and years later. He'd taken advantage of the flood to disappear and start a whole new life elsewhere under a new name and everything. I guess that would not be possible now, what with computer databases and fingerprinting and such.
I've sometimes wondered if someone thought to be lost in the fall of the World Trade Center might have been walking towards the towers, saw them fall then turned on his (or her) heel and walked away, to start a new life somewhere else. Certainly it'd be a bit harder to do in 2001 than in 1889.
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Old 09-06-2017, 08:17 AM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Just finished Delia Sherman's The Freedom Maze, as recommended by jsgoddess. It's about a girl in the 1960's who time-travels to the 1860's and lives as a slave. I was a little irritated at the main character when she read Gone With the Wind and didn't love it, and I thought her mother was something of a cartoon character, but loved the time travel and the story she lived in the past. I was laying awake at night trying to figure out what was going to happen next. Really good!
  #29  
Old 09-06-2017, 08:20 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Read a very short time ago, what I envisage as being Ben Elton’s most recent novel – Time And Time Again. I usually find this author’s offerings to be compulsive reading -- this was the case here. I enjoy his relatively terse and non-flowery writing style, and his deploying of his fertile imagination.

Not to “spoil” this novel for future readers -- will just say that it features an interesting and to me, new, angle on the time-travel theme. Of all things, a discovery by Sir Isaac Newton, makes possible a very narrow, restricted and specific “window” for someone to go back in time. Novel’s premise involves going back to 1914, to forestall World War I from taking place. Ingenious -- and to this reader anyway, totally unexpected -- twists on the aforesaid, come about.

And just a couple of days back -- found on sale (at an almost give-away price), Val McDermid’s latest thriller. This lady’s prolifically produced works are to me, a “crack” equivalent -- usually when I become aware of a new one, I buy and devour it. Am a bit puzzled by this addiction: IMO she writes competently, but not with that wonderful a talent. Would reckon, it’s just that I love her characters (different sets of same, in different milieux -- a series of novels for each milieu, with the occasional total stand-alone) -- especially her two-sexes “odd couple” in the police detective / criminal profiling field, Carol Jordan and Tony Hill. This latest, Insidious Intent , is a Carol-and-Tony one -- for me, certainly gripping: read it at one sitting, which I usually do with anything by McDerrmid.

(One thing which I don’t like about VMcD, is the titles she gives her novels: she seems bent on making them vague and “abstract” and un-memorable: I have a hard time recalling which book belongs with which title.)
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:12 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Addition to my above post -- I haven't always been so addicted to this particular series by McDermid; but it is the case nowadays, for sure.
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Old 09-06-2017, 10:07 AM
The wind of my soul The wind of my soul is offline
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I read The Woman in Cabin 10 over the weekend. Don't bother.
Why not?
  #32  
Old 09-09-2017, 02:09 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is online now
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Finished Washington: A Life, by Ron Chernow. Excellent. Reading this and his Alexander Hamilton close together has given me some good insights into the period. And both books mention Dr. Samuel Bard of New York, a possible ancestor or distant relative of mine. My paternal grandmother's maiden name was Bard, and she came from the Albany area.

Have started The Late Show, by Michael Connelly. The wife has already read it and loved it. We bought it shortly after it came out, and Connelly is one of the few authors I'll buy the hardcover copy instead of wait for the paperback. The title references the graveyard shift at the LAPD, specifically in Hollywood. This novel introduces a new protagonist in the Connelly pantheon, Detective Renee Ballard.
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Old 09-09-2017, 10:22 AM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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We interrupt this thread:

Florida and Carribean Dopers STAY SAFE! Please, take care if you're going to be in the path of Irma. Additionally, please, check in after Irma passes and you get power back. The internet isa great thing, it gives us friends all over the world,but the other side is it gives us more people to worry about. So please let us know you are safe.

On with the reading, might as well get a few books wrapped while sitting out the storm.
  #34  
Old 09-09-2017, 11:51 AM
gigi gigi is offline
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Why not?
I thought it wasn't bad. It keeps moving and has some twists to it.

I finished "Since We Fell". Pretty much custom-made for the movie adaptation. But it was entertaining.
  #35  
Old 09-09-2017, 06:54 PM
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I finished reading "Dombey and Son" by Charles Dickens. I thought it was pretty good; it's from his middle period where his stories start to be less loosey-goosey but where he's still putting in plenty of humourous characters (Cap'en Cuttle and his sagacious friend Bunsby, Mr. Toots and the Game Chicken, Major Bagstock). At this point, the only Dickens novels that I haven't read are "Barnaby Rudge" and "Hard Times" (and "The Mystery of Edwin Drood").

I took a brief break to re-read (for the 3rd or 4th time) "The Legacy of Heorot" by Larry Niven, Steve Barnes and the late Jerry Pournelle. The human vs. monster scenes were just as fun as the last time I read it.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:14 AM
peedin peedin is offline
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Why not?
Because it is a stupid plot with a long drawn out nonsensical ending. It's considered a psychological thriller. That genre is overdone these days, with Gone Girl as the seminal work. Someone disappears, only the plucky heroine is concerned, yaddayaddayadda. I'm done with those. Picked up The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes at the library yesterday.

Last edited by peedin; 09-10-2017 at 09:14 AM.
  #37  
Old 09-10-2017, 10:44 PM
delphica delphica is offline
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I finally got around to reading The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements by Sam Kean, and I enjoyed it. I like cute anecdotes about science, and I thought it reasonably presented a somewhat deeper set of information about quantum science, but not so technical that you (I) couldn't follow the thread.

Another one that had been languishing on my pile was Gwendy's Button Box, by Stephen King and some guy. It was okay enough for SK fans, although it was barely more than a short story.

The other thing I've been doing is working through Hilary McKay's Casson family books -- it's a YA series and I wasn't nuts about the first few I read when they originally came out. They left me cold, and a lot of the humor seemed mean. But some people adore them, and my book club was doing the first one. The second time around, I still don't love them, but I can see more of what appeals to people. Sometimes there's something about reading a book for a set purpose like book club where I don't feel as invested in it, which actually let me see its merits in a more objective way, I guess.
  #38  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:40 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is online now
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Finished John Scalzi's You're Not Fooling Anyone When You Take Your Laptop to a Coffee Shop: Scalzi on Writing, which I enjoyed. I'm currently reading Rachel Swaby's Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science--and the World.
  #39  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:55 PM
Left Hand of Dorkness Left Hand of Dorkness is offline
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On Saturday, on a camping trip, I finally finished reading Castle Hangnail to my daughters, based on a recommendation here (jsgoddess?) Thank you for the recommendation--it was excellent! More than a touch of Pratchett without being derivative, my wife would often snort with laughter as she listened in on the reading, and there were times I had to stop my own giggling in order to continue.

I'm currently reading Wild Things: the Joy of Reading Children's Literature as an Adult. It's a fun, breezy read. The author has a bit more patience with Freudian criticism than I do, and I find some of his conclusions suspect; but I don't mind an author with an opinion, even when I think it's wrong, and it's also got plenty of fascinating tidbits in it. I never new Beatrix Potter was such a naturalist, for example.
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  #40  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:25 PM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Finished Iain Banks "Against a Dark Background". And...still not a fan of Banks. The plot didn't take exactly the route I expected it to take, but it more or less ended up where I thought it would, but the conclusion left me feeling "Eh?". It all seemed sort of pointless, especially considering the actions of the book trigger off what appears to be a small war.

Essentially, as the heroine stands fighting the bad guy, she's asked "Are you really that selfish a person?" And she decides that yes, yes she is. Maybe that's the philosophical point that Banks was trying to make. Or maybe there was just no actual point to the whole plot -- it was just something that happened somewhere; isn't this interesting?

There's also a point in the book where our trained team of rogues finds themselves outgunned. outmanned, and pitifully equipped to continue their mission, but with a method of aborting and trying again another day. And do they do the intelligent thing? No...they do a Frodo and Samwise deathcrawl into Mordor scenario, for no good reason. Although their actions are no less poorly motivated than several other characters in the book, who do bizarrely complex things for no apparent reason.

So, shrug. Kind of a bleak read with no real payoff.
  #41  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:54 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is online now
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About 2/3 of the way through the latest "Longmire" book. If you're looking for a good series to read, Craig Johnson's Longmire books are entertaining and well-written for the most part.
  #42  
Old 09-11-2017, 06:18 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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=Left Hand of Dorkness;20471393]On Saturday, on a camping trip, I finally finished reading Castle Hangnail to my daughters, based on a recommendation here (jsgoddess?) Thank you for the recommendation--it was excellent! More than a touch of Pratchett without being derivative, my wife would often snort with laughter as she listened in on the reading, and there were times I had to stop my own giggling in order to continue.
YAY! It's honestly one of my favorites in the last few years. Ursula Vernon is a fabulous writer.

Last edited by DZedNConfused; 09-11-2017 at 06:21 PM.
  #43  
Old 09-11-2017, 06:47 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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I finished I am not a serial killer by Dan Wells. Can't say I particularly enjoyed it, the characters were pretty unilaterally unlikeable and the twist was bullshit.
  #44  
Old 09-11-2017, 07:11 PM
Left Hand of Dorkness Left Hand of Dorkness is offline
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YAY! It's honestly one of my favorites in the last few years. Ursula Vernon is a fabulous writer.
Your recommendation? Awesome--thanks again! Have you read her Dragonbreath series? Our local library branch doesn't have it, and I'm wondering whether it's worth reserving.

Meanwhile, I just got a new book for read-aloud. The author is a complete unknown to me, but the book looks to be a hoot: The Inquisitor's Tale, or, The Three Magical Children and their Holy Dog. I'll let y'all know whether it's good.
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  #45  
Old 09-11-2017, 07:21 PM
mhendo mhendo is offline
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I'm about 220 pages into a 765-page book on parking policy.

Donald Shoup, The High Cost of Free Parking.

It's fascinating.
  #46  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:50 PM
DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand of Dorkness View Post
Your recommendation? Awesome--thanks again! Have you read her Dragonbreath series? Our local library branch doesn't have it, and I'm wondering whether it's worth reserving.
I believe both I and jsgoddess have read and recommended it. I gallantly share the credit.

I've not read her Dragonsbreath books. I have read a few of her short pieces and her humour is very much the same.

Other fiction by T. Kingfisher aka Ursula Vernon. I don't know your child so you might want to check them out first. She got her second Hugo, this year, for The Tomato Thief
  #47  
Old 09-12-2017, 01:21 AM
movingfinger movingfinger is offline
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I am enjoying the hell out of The Joys of Yiddish, first published in 1968 and written by Leo Rosten. I went to nearly-98 percent Jewish schools, so many of the terms were quite familiar, but there were plenty more to learn, and Rosten included proverbs and brief parables--better call them jokes--to illustrate his points. Highly recommended.
  #48  
Old 09-12-2017, 09:50 AM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
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Close to nothing. Tapping Hitler's Generals, too many transcripts and not enough commentary. More "document" than "book."
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Last edited by Paul in Qatar; 09-12-2017 at 09:52 AM.
  #49  
Old 09-12-2017, 06:16 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Finished McCullough's The Johnstown Flood. Good stuff, but it ended on a discouraging note - the tycoons (including Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick) who owned the dam which broke didn't pay a penny to compensate for the 2,000-some lives lost and the millions of damage done.

At a Christian friend's urging, I tried Robert Henderson's Operating in the Courts of Heaven, but gave up after 50 pages. Henderson takes bits and pieces of the Bible to argue that we need to pray as if we're in court opposite Satan the prosecutor, with Jesus as our lawyer and God on the seat of judgment. Didn't convince me, to say the least.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
Finished Washington: A Life, by Ron Chernow. Excellent. Reading this and his Alexander Hamilton close together has given me some good insights into the period. And both books mention Dr. Samuel Bard of New York, a possible ancestor or distant relative of mine. My paternal grandmother's maiden name was Bard, and she came from the Albany area....
Glad you liked the book, and that's a cool family connection!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul in Qatar View Post
Close to nothing. Tapping Hitler's Generals, too many transcripts and not enough commentary. More "document" than "book."
Have a look at post 62 and thereafter in this thread: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...=572326&page=2
  #50  
Old 09-12-2017, 08:05 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is online now
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Finished Rachel Swaby's Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science--and the World. Even though I'd heard of most of the women in the book, it was still interesting and I learned some new things. When I was a kid I really enjoyed reading books like this, with short biographies of important women who'd changed the world.

Started 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, by Charles C. Mann.
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