Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-31-2016, 10:52 AM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Black cars and summer heat

Has anyone found a way to deal with this? My car is solid black. I can't always park in the shade, and I would like to know what Dopers with black cars do to avoid the hot sun if at all possible. (I have a reflecting shade to put inside the windshield when I park.)
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 05-31-2016, 11:48 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 10,019
Tinted windows.

Cloth interior.

Park in a place or direction where the sun will not shine directly on the front seat(s).
  #3  
Old 05-31-2016, 11:55 AM
Xema Xema is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 11,490
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougie_monty View Post
Has anyone found a way to deal with this?
One scheme would be to avoid buying black - or indeed generally dark-colored - cars.
  #4  
Old 05-31-2016, 11:56 AM
engineer_comp_geek engineer_comp_geek is online now
Robot Mod in Beta Testing
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 19,261
I don't have a black car, but one thing I've found that helps a lot is to crack the windows (a couple of inches) on both the driver and passenger sides. Some folks online say this doesn't help, but I've found that it makes a noticeable difference in my cars.

They also make solar powered fans that you can stick in the window crack to help get more air flow through the car. I've never tried one personally so I don't know how well they work.
  #5  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:04 PM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Thanx
  #6  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:27 PM
joe.russell joe.russell is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 61
Does the color really play a significant role in this? I figure it wouldnt matter what color it was, and I maybe could argue that a dark color would reflect more? however insignificant that would be.
I agree that cracking your windows/sunroof is the best idea. Ive got rain guards on one of my vehicles which helps.
  #7  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:29 PM
I. Dunno I. Dunno is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 243
I don't know if this really helps but I leave the AC/Heat control in 'Vent' in conjunction with cracking the windows. I like to think it helps move a little air through the vehicle.
  #8  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:45 PM
iceiso iceiso is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 133
Nothing ground breaking, but you could try:
- Putting a reflective shield on the rear windshield as well, which is especially effective if it is very sloped.
- Getting those suction-cup perforated shades for your side windows.
- Cracking the sunroof.
- Verify if your car has a remote window opening feature. I park close to my office window, so ~10 minutes before I leave the office, I remote open the windows and find this makes a huge difference.
  #9  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:51 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe.russell View Post
Does the color really play a significant role in this? I figure it wouldnt matter what color it was, and I maybe could argue that a dark color would reflect more? however insignificant that would be.
I agree that cracking your windows/sunroof is the best idea. Ive got rain guards on one of my vehicles which helps.
Yes, I hike a lot in the desert, parking my car at trailheads, often with no shade. In intense sun, the car color makes a big difference in how quickly it heats up.

When you say a dark color might "reflect more", I think perhaps you mean radiate more of the heat back away? But no, it does not. The sun's thermal radiation (5800K black body spectrum) is predominantly visible light. So, what we perceive as a light color is a surface that reflects more of the sun's direct radiation, a dark color absorbs more. Now, I think you are considering the fact that the car itself will also be radiating heat back out. But the car is at a much lower temperature that the sun, so the car's thermal radiation is at a much longer wavelength in the infra-red part of the spectrum. Color (in the visible spectrum) is not correlated with infra-red (way different part of the spectrum) emissivity, so a black car will not radiate more heat away.

Infra-red emissivity, from I can recall, is more correlated with something appearing shiny or metallic in the visible part of the spectrum, so it's likely that different paint finishes rather than color will affect how much a car radiates back out. I have no clue how big an effect that might be.

ETA: the wiki article has a table for IR emissivity for some materials if you page down
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emissivity

Last edited by Riemann; 05-31-2016 at 12:53 PM.
  #10  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:54 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 10,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe.russell View Post
Does the color really play a significant role in this? I figure it wouldnt matter what color it was, and I maybe could argue that a dark color would reflect more? however insignificant that would be.
Yes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZS95SPm4f2I
  #11  
Old 05-31-2016, 12:57 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 39,256
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
But why didn't they compare two cars that were identical, except for color?

And does a black car retain more heat in winter?

Last edited by panache45; 05-31-2016 at 01:00 PM.
  #12  
Old 05-31-2016, 01:02 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
And does a black car retain more heat in winter?
No - that's based on the same answer that I gave just above (post #9) - the IR emissivity of a surface (hence the rate of radiative cooling) is not correlated with its color, because color and IR radiation are so far apart in the EM spectrum. The paint finish may affect the rate of cooling.

Last edited by Riemann; 05-31-2016 at 01:04 PM.
  #13  
Old 05-31-2016, 01:11 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
But why didn't they compare two cars that were identical, except for color?
I'm guessing it's because the amount of planning and design that went into this experiment was "Dude, this FLIR camera is awesome, what can we do with it at lunchtime?" Also, that soundtrack should never have got past peer review.
  #14  
Old 05-31-2016, 01:56 PM
Surreal Surreal is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 2,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
But why didn't they compare two cars that were identical, except for color?
Good point. Here's a study that did a comparison between otherwise identical silver and black compact sedans:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...06261911002972

The black car ended up having a cabin air temperature about 10F higher:
Quote:
An experimental comparison of otherwise identical black and silver compact sedans indicated that increasing the solar reflectance (ρ) of the cars shell by about 0.5 lowered the soak temperature of breath-level air by about 56 C.
  #15  
Old 05-31-2016, 02:54 PM
SpeedwayRyan SpeedwayRyan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 746
If tinted windows are legal in your state, it will make a huge difference. If you let the shop know that reducing interior temps is your primary concern, they can recommend a good tint for UV protection (which doesn't always correlate directly with darkess).

I've had tinted windows on my car and my wife's car for years and once in awhile I'll get in someone else's car without tint after it's been sitting in the sun, and I'm just floored by how hot it is. Like "Is this an oven? Oh, they don't have tinted windows. That's why I feel like I am burning alive."
  #16  
Old 05-31-2016, 03:01 PM
obbn obbn is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 2,343
Use a car cover. Keeps things cooler and keeps dirt off.
  #17  
Old 05-31-2016, 03:11 PM
jjakucyk jjakucyk is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 231
The Mythbusters put thermometers in two cars parked in the sun and the black car was about 10 degrees hotter. The thing I'd be more interested in is the color of the interior. Black leather is the hottest versus a light tan or gray cloth for example, but is that more or less of a factor than the exterior paint color?

Also about window tinting, does anyone know how much of a factor that is? I'm curious because while the tinting may block sun from heating up the objects that it hits inside (seats, dash, consoles, etc.), it also makes the glass itself hotter, acting sort of like a radiator. I'd rather get a low-e coating like they put on building windows since it's designed specifically to reflect heat, and I'm not personally interested in tinting itself.

Occasionally questions come up about putting photovoltaic solar panels on car roofs to keep the air conditioner running, or to recharge electric cars. Sadly they don't produce nearly enough power for either of those things, but they would generate enough power to keep the climate control blower running. By constantly bringing fresh air in through the vents it would keep the temperature inside quite a bit cooler while also eliminating the risk of break-ins or summer showers that come with cracking the windows or sunroof. Plus most cars have pollen filters, and I've found that leaving the windows cracked makes my car's interior filthy with dust in no time. Not to mention that unless there's a strong wind blowing sideways across the car, cracking the windows won't do much since there's no chimney effect.
  #18  
Old 05-31-2016, 03:21 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 26,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Tinted windows.

Cloth interior.

Park in a place or direction where the sun will not shine directly on the front seat(s).
One trick that I learned was that you don't need to park in the shade...you need to park where the shade will be when you'll be using the car again.
  #19  
Old 05-31-2016, 03:30 PM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NY USA
Posts: 7,635
You see, this is why the terrorists hate us...

Leave your windows cracked open a bit, open the driver's door, wait a couple seconds for the initial rush of hot air to escape, sit in the driver's set, leave the door open, start your car, immediately lower all four windows (and open the sunroof), and turn the A/C on full blast. Problem solved in about 60 seconds.

Yes, I own a car with a black (dark grey) exterior and black leather interior. Leather BTW cools off much faster than cloth (it also heats up faster in the winter, hence the preference for it...)
  #20  
Old 05-31-2016, 04:10 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 26,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail Ants View Post
You see, this is why the terrorists hate us...

Leave your windows cracked open a bit, open the driver's door, wait a couple seconds for the initial rush of hot air to escape, sit in the driver's set, leave the door open, start your car, immediately lower all four windows (and open the sunroof), and turn the A/C on full blast. Problem solved in about 60 seconds.

Yes, I own a car with a black (dark grey) exterior and black leather interior. Leather BTW cools off much faster than cloth (it also heats up faster in the winter, hence the preference for it...)
This reminds me, if you have a Honda, many of the newer ones have a trick where if you hold down the unlock button on the key fob all the windows will go down. Really, really annoying, I wish there was a way to turn it off since holding down the lock button doesn't roll them all back up. If you do it by accident you have to close each one, including the sun roof, if you have one.

This seemed like a good place to mention it, since it's designed to let the hot air out of your car as your walking towards it from across a parking lot.
  #21  
Old 05-31-2016, 04:47 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 39,256
And it sometimes helps to have a hatchback. If I spend a few minutes loading stuff into my car, it's enough time for much of the heat to escape before I get in and drive.
  #22  
Old 05-31-2016, 06:21 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 26,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
And it sometimes helps to have a hatchback. If I spend a few minutes loading stuff into my car, it's enough time for much of the heat to escape before I get in and drive.
OTOH, the problem I had with having a hatch back is that from time to time I'd have (plastic) things melt in there that I never had a problem with in my trunk.

Of course, the ultimate solution is to have a garage. Blazing heat or a foot of snow and your car is still ready to drive.
  #23  
Old 05-31-2016, 07:19 PM
JerrySTL JerrySTL is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,147
I put a reflective shade in the front window and try to point the car where the sun will be when I get back into it. It does make a difference especially when grabbing the black steering wheel. Ouch!

I also have vent visors on the front door windows so that I can keep the windows down an inch or so and not have to worry about rain. The vent visors seem to work best if there's a cross wind blowing through the windows.

Of the two, the reflective shade works best.
  #24  
Old 05-31-2016, 07:58 PM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NY USA
Posts: 7,635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
This reminds me, if you have a Honda, many of the newer ones have a trick where if you hold down the unlock button on the key fob all the windows will go down. Really, really annoying, I wish there was a way to turn it off since holding down the lock button doesn't roll them all back up. If you do it by accident you have to close each one, including the sun roof, if you have one.
VW had a similar feature awhile back, with a funny commercial where a nerdy guy reads about it in his new car's owner manual and then eagerly shows it to his wife, who couldn't care less...
  #25  
Old 06-02-2016, 10:00 AM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Related matter

...a cat rather than a car. Our cat Archie, of the Sixties, who was colored like the Clinton's cat Socks or Sylvester of the cartoons, had fluffy fur. He probably disliked the heat of summer as much as we humans--although I don't know how that works with cats, whose body temperature is three degrees higher than humans'. He seemed to know where all the shady spots were outside; he often stayed in a clump of bushes near our driveway that we called his "jungle."
  #26  
Old 06-02-2016, 11:36 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 12,796
An anecdote that someone might be able to explain. When I was a paper-boy, the weekly collection for the paper delivery was 45c, and in those days, coins were made of silver. Some customers would just leave the 45c on the porch on collection day. Coins in direct sun for a few hours were too hot to touch. Why would the shiny silver surface absorb, rather than reflect, so much of the solar energy?
  #27  
Old 06-02-2016, 12:20 PM
troub troub is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 1,524
Shiny or not, if it's in the sun it will eventually come to absorb enough to become hot. It may even simply reach the same temperature as the concrete (or wood, or whatever) of the porch, as well, though note that you may not feel that surface is too hot to touch. Metal is generally a good conductor of heat, so it may feel hotter to you when you touch it as it more quickly transfers that heat to your hand.
  #28  
Old 06-02-2016, 01:21 PM
Surreal Surreal is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 2,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
An anecdote that someone might be able to explain. When I was a paper-boy, the weekly collection for the paper delivery was 45c, and in those days, coins were made of silver. Some customers would just leave the 45c on the porch on collection day. Coins in direct sun for a few hours were too hot to touch. Why would the shiny silver surface absorb, rather than reflect, so much of the solar energy?
The reason the coins felt too hot to touch may have had more to do with the coins' thermal conductivity rather than their emissivity. I know Pre-1965 coins weren't pure silver, but silver does have the highest thermal conductivity of any metal so it can transfer heat to your hand very effectively.
  #29  
Old 06-02-2016, 01:46 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
An anecdote that someone might be able to explain. When I was a paper-boy, the weekly collection for the paper delivery was 45c, and in those days, coins were made of silver. Some customers would just leave the 45c on the porch on collection day. Coins in direct sun for a few hours were too hot to touch. Why would the shiny silver surface absorb, rather than reflect, so much of the solar energy?
Metals have lowish specific heat capacity - they can't "hold" much heat energy, so a small energy input/output corresponds to a large temperature change. Thus, for a given amount of sunlight absorbed (i.e. comparing two things the same color) a metal coin will heat up more quickly than (say) soil.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_c...eat_capacities

Metals also have a very high thermal conductivity - heat "moves around" within metal easily. Thus, if you compare touching a hot metal to a hot [anything else] at the same temperature, the metal will give you a more severe burn. With [anything else], only the heat in the surface layer is conducted to your skin; with a metal, the heat from the entire object is rapidly transferred to your skin.
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/th...ity-d_429.html

Last edited by Riemann; 06-02-2016 at 01:50 PM.
  #30  
Old 06-02-2016, 05:46 PM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreal View Post
The reason the coins felt too hot to touch may have had more to do with the coins' thermal conductivity rather than their emissivity. I know Pre-1965 coins weren't pure silver, but silver does have the highest thermal conductivity of any metal so it can transfer heat to your hand very effectively.
They were 9 parts silver and one part copper. On a scale of 1 to 100, with silver being at 100 as the best conductor of heat, copper comes in second-best at 95. (Source: Isaac Asimov.) That would make for mighty warm coins, I'd say.
  #31  
Old 06-02-2016, 06:42 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,273
A/C??? Seems to work well with my black car, white car, red car, tan car, blue car (which I never really had - but anyway), silver car.
  #32  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:42 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 10,255
I had to drive a black car with a black car for a year in the Sonora desert, and the parking lot at work had no place at all for shade.

The only thing that ever gave me relief was covering the steering wheel with a white towel during the day, otherwise I literally would be unable to grasp the steering wheel enough to drive safely. (We weren’t allowed to crack the windows on company-owned cars, unfortunately, due to high levels of property crimes in the area.)

So much radiated heat would build up that the air conditioner took about 30 minutes to catch up. It was only a 25 minute drive home.

I never did figure out who the hell thought it would be a good idea to order black cars in Sonora.
  #33  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:52 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
It surprises me when renting cars in desert areas that agents don't understand immediately why somebody would want a light colored car. A couple of times I've had a car rental agent look at me askance when I've said I don't want a black car. I'm pretty sure they thought I was a racist. But I can't be, right? After all, some of my friends have black cars.

Last edited by Riemann; 06-02-2016 at 07:54 PM.
  #34  
Old 06-02-2016, 11:01 PM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riemann View Post
It surprises me when renting cars in desert areas that agents don't understand immediately why somebody would want a light colored car. A couple of times I've had a car rental agent look at me askance when I've said I don't want a black car. I'm pretty sure they thought I was a racist. But I can't be, right? After all, some of my friends have black cars.
I wonder what color cars did the agents themselves drive.
  #35  
Old 06-03-2016, 03:21 AM
rock party rock party is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 645
There's a huge opportunity for someone who figures out how to keep cars cooler in the summer. Kids and pets wouldn't have to die anymore, and your hands and butt wouldn't have to burn.

I think maybe if the roof and hood were solar collectors there would be enough power to keep the interior below say 90 degrees, cool enough so you could take kids and pets without accidentally baking them.
  #36  
Old 06-03-2016, 03:00 PM
SpeedwayRyan SpeedwayRyan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjakucyk View Post
Also about window tinting, does anyone know how much of a factor that is? I'm curious because while the tinting may block sun from heating up the objects that it hits inside (seats, dash, consoles, etc.), it also makes the glass itself hotter, acting sort of like a radiator. I'd rather get a low-e coating like they put on building windows since it's designed specifically to reflect heat, and I'm not personally interested in tinting itself.
Pretty substantial. The link below has some specifics, but 50%+ heat rejection is common. You can get clear tints that reject heat, BTW, if interested in keeping the interior cooler but not in the look of tinted glass.

http://w3.llumar.com/skinprotection/discover-cool.html
  #37  
Old 06-03-2016, 03:10 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 26,550
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
A/C??? Seems to work well with my black car, white car, red car, tan car, blue car (which I never really had - but anyway), silver car.
Running it 24/7 must play hell with your mpg.
  #38  
Old 06-03-2016, 03:43 PM
Hayden Hayden is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 59
This. Tint is the best way to reduce interior heat and makes a big difference.

A ceramic film generally provides the best heat rejection, but even a quality non-ceramic film will help a lot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeedwayRyan View Post
Pretty substantial. The link below has some specifics, but 50%+ heat rejection is common. You can get clear tints that reject heat, BTW, if interested in keeping the interior cooler but not in the look of tinted glass.



http://w3.llumar.com/skinprotection/discover-cool.html





Sent from my iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
  #39  
Old 06-03-2016, 05:05 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 12,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riemann View Post
Metals have lowish specific heat capacity - they can't "hold" much heat energy, so a small energy input/output corresponds to a large temperature change. Thus, for a given amount of sunlight absorbed (i.e. comparing two things the same color) a metal coin will heat up more quickly than (say) soil.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_c...eat_capacities

Metals also have a very high thermal conductivity - heat "moves around" within metal easily. Thus, if you compare touching a hot metal to a hot [anything else] at the same temperature, the metal will give you a more severe burn. With [anything else], only the heat in the surface layer is conducted to your skin; with a metal, the heat from the entire object is rapidly transferred to your skin.
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/th...ity-d_429.html
So, applying this to the OP, would a metal car transmit exterior-sourced heat to its interior space more efficiently than, say, a plastic or fiberglass car, and therefore be hotter inside??

Last edited by jtur88; 06-03-2016 at 05:06 PM.
  #40  
Old 06-03-2016, 05:24 PM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
So, applying this to the OP, would a metal car transmit exterior-sourced heat to its interior space more efficiently than, say, a plastic or fiberglass car, and therefore be hotter inside??
Other things being equal, yes. I don't know much about cars - is there usually an insulation layer of some kind inside the panels?
  #41  
Old 06-05-2016, 09:29 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 10,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riemann View Post
Other things being equal, yes. I don't know much about cars - is there usually an insulation layer of some kind inside the panels?
I build cars, so I'm qualified to answer this: nope, there isn't. At least, not in the sense that there's something there to specifically keep heat or cold out or in. The headliner, of course, has insulating properties, and there are all sorts of sealers and mastics applied everywhere in the car, but most of the insulation is intended for noise and fluids (water and air).
  #42  
Old 06-06-2016, 12:37 AM
Princhester Princhester is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 14,257
I've mentioned previously that in my teens a friend of my younger brother took advantage of the fact his father collected a certain type of car, and had about five of them of various colours.

He parked them all in the sun at the same angle and measured the temperature in each over a day. Instant winning school science project. The results were unquestionably against owning a black car and in favour of owning a white car in a hot climate.
  #43  
Old 06-06-2016, 09:24 AM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Princhester View Post
I've mentioned previously that in my teens a friend of my younger brother took advantage of the fact his father collected a certain type of car, and had about five of them of various colours.

He parked them all in the sun at the same angle and measured the temperature in each over a day. Instant winning school science project. The results were unquestionably against owning a black car and in favour of owning a white car in a hot climate.
The only disadvantage to owning a white car is the difficulty of keeping it clean.
  #44  
Old 06-06-2016, 10:20 AM
silenus silenus is online now
The Turtle Moves!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 48,252
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougie_monty View Post
The only disadvantage to owning a white car is the difficulty of keeping it clean.
Actually, I've found the exact opposite to be true. Most of the cars I've owned over the years have been lighter colored ones (white, silver, light blue, pale yellow, etc.) Those cars never showed dust or light grime. Whereas my latest vehicle (Metallic Arctic Blue)(meaning damn near Black) shows every dust mote and water spot.
  #45  
Old 06-06-2016, 10:39 AM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Actually, I've found the exact opposite to be true. Most of the cars I've owned over the years have been lighter colored ones (white, silver, light blue, pale yellow, etc.) Those cars never showed dust or light grime. Whereas my latest vehicle (Metallic Arctic Blue)(meaning damn near Black) shows every dust mote and water spot.
I think it depends somewhat where you live - dark mud splatter vs pale desert dust.
  #46  
Old 06-06-2016, 10:53 AM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Gardena, CA 90248-3235
Posts: 10,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riemann View Post
I think it depends somewhat where you live - dark mud splatter vs pale desert dust.
I have lived in Southern California since 1952 and water in the Los Angeles area is notoriously hard, and leaves spots and streaks on car metal surfaces and glass. Including on white cars.
  #47  
Old 06-06-2016, 10:56 AM
Spiderman Spiderman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: somewhere East of there
Posts: 7,973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreal View Post
Good point. Here's a study that did a comparison between otherwise identical silver and black compact sedans:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...06261911002972

The black car ended up having a cabin air temperature about 10F higher:
I'd like to see it expanded to four cars - two white exterior & two black exterior x two black interior & two tan interior. Maybe a further expansion to cloth vs leather, etc. I refuse to get a black interior, to the point that I bought a different colored exterior because of the manufacturer's you can only get this interior with that exterior scheme.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail Ants View Post
Yes, I own a car with a black (dark grey) exterior and black leather interior. Leather BTW cools off much faster than cloth (it also heats up faster in the winter, hence the preference for it...)
Leather may cool off faster; however since it's initially hotter, the the back of your thighs are fused to the seat when it does cool off.
  #48  
Old 06-06-2016, 11:02 AM
jjakucyk jjakucyk is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiderman View Post
I'd like to see it expanded to four cars - two white exterior & two black exterior x two black interior & two tan interior. Maybe a further expansion to cloth vs leather, etc. I refuse to get a black interior, to the point that I bought a different colored exterior because of the manufacturer's you can only get this interior with that exterior scheme.

Leather may cool off faster; however since it's initially hotter, the the back of your thighs are fused to the seat when it does cool off.
It's kind of like the argument about black versus white roofs. Yes black will radiate heat away better than white, but the black HAS to radiate away more because it absorbed so much more heat to begin with.
  #49  
Old 06-06-2016, 11:03 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: beautiful Idaho
Posts: 2,013
The fan should go on in the car if the temperature is too high. Doesn't have to go on continuously.
  #50  
Old 06-06-2016, 11:28 AM
Riemann Riemann is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Santa Fe, NM, USA
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjakucyk View Post
...black will radiate heat away better than white...
This is a common misconception, but not true - see post #9.

Last edited by Riemann; 06-06-2016 at 11:28 AM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:17 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017