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  #51  
Old 06-10-2016, 09:33 PM
Digital is the new Analog Digital is the new Analog is offline
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Originally Posted by The Great Sun Jester View Post
I cannot taste avocados, my wife insists they have a flavor and devours them by the basket (Apparently I make a killer guacamole, just tastes like spices and paste to me).
I've never thought of that angle. I have the same issue. Everyone claims that guacamole is so yummy, but to me, it's a bland thing that just carries spices.
In context of this thread, it seems more reasonable.



I'm also on board with the no-raw-tomato crowd.
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  #52  
Old 06-11-2016, 11:41 AM
DaphneBlack DaphneBlack is offline
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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
I don't know if it's a genetic thing or not, but I find raspberries teeth-meltingly acidic. Even the ripest juiciest ones that my wife swears are as sweet as anything make me feel as if my tooth enamel is being liquefied.
I agree with this, and the raw tomatoes thing. My acidic stomach trying to help itself out?

I tried lavender-and-something ice cream once, it felt like I was licking body wash. Eurgh.

Avocadoes are weird -- unless they are perfectly ripe, they have zero flavor and revolting, inedible texture. But I love a perfectly ripe avocado or guacamole. Overripe avos go back to inedible pretty quickly (again both taste and texture.

I love asparagus even though the smell happens.

I want to know: is there an anti-supertaster? I prefer strongly-flavored foods, except for salty and sweet. I really like bitter, sour and umami flavors, as well as spicy heat (though my stomach disagrees with me there!). I don't have a strong sense of smell (probably chronically stuffy nose), so I wonder if that's the whole story, or if I just have insensitive taste-buds as well.
  #53  
Old 06-11-2016, 11:44 AM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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Originally Posted by DaphneBlack View Post
I want to know: is there an anti-supertaster? I prefer strongly-flavored foods, except for salty and sweet. I really like bitter, sour and umami flavors, as well as spicy heat (though my stomach disagrees with me there!). I don't have a strong sense of smell (probably chronically stuffy nose), so I wonder if that's the whole story, or if I just have insensitive taste-buds as well.
We're similar. Though I do like salty as well.
  #54  
Old 06-11-2016, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by DaphneBlack View Post

I want to know: is there an anti-supertaster?
A Challenged Taster.
  #55  
Old 06-11-2016, 03:32 PM
DaphneBlack DaphneBlack is offline
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Originally Posted by jsgoddess View Post
We're similar. Though I do like salty as well.
Salty and sweet aren't bad for me, just my tolerance is lower. I guess I taste them sooner or something. I'll cook liberally with salt, but never/very rarely feel the need to add it to already-cooked dishes.

Glad to know I am not the only one!
  #56  
Old 06-11-2016, 04:40 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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Originally Posted by DaphneBlack View Post
Salty and sweet aren't bad for me, just my tolerance is lower. I guess I taste them sooner or something. I'll cook liberally with salt, but never/very rarely feel the need to add it to already-cooked dishes.

Glad to know I am not the only one!
Sweet gets to me fairly quickly. But I have a frighteningly high tolerance for salt.
  #57  
Old 06-11-2016, 06:17 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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I hate sweet potatoes. A bite of them would truly make me want to vomit back when I was a young'un. Now, I could choke down a bite without wretching, but it would take some effort. I attribute this to my taste buds getting weaker as I have aged.

The funny thing is that I find sweet potatoes pretty good raw. Raw, they taste like milky sweet raw carrots. Carrots also change flavor when cooked, and not for the better. Same with celery. What reactions does the heat cause to produce such distasteful flavors?
  #58  
Old 06-11-2016, 07:29 PM
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What reactions does the heat cause to produce such distasteful flavors?
I believe that cooking changes starches into sugars.
  #59  
Old 06-11-2016, 08:58 PM
Common Tater Common Tater is offline
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Raw carrots have a sweetness that is awesome, cooked don't do much for me, though they make stews better. Celery isn't too bad either, but will never remember to buy it.

The cilantro thing I never quite got. Maybe it doesn't taste soapy to me, but it definitely has a hair shirt element to it. Sort of a taste-bud numbing deal. It's not objectionable in small amounts, tho I don't know why it took off like it did.
  #60  
Old 06-11-2016, 09:05 PM
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Raw carrots have a sweetness that is awesome,
I think that is the starch sugar thing.
  #61  
Old 06-11-2016, 09:18 PM
araminty araminty is offline
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Originally Posted by wolfman View Post
As far as Cilantro I literally learned to cook originally because Mexican food was my favorite, then pretty much overnight around '88 every dish in every Mexican place was contaminated with that shit. I haven't been to a Mexican restaurant since 90 or so, there is nothing I can eat.
Can't you just ask for no cilantro? It's usually sprinkled on right before serving, so it would trivial to leave off.
  #62  
Old 06-12-2016, 03:52 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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That would work.... if cooks/preppers/servers would actually do that.

Some places their work is such a routine for them they'll do it without thinking.

And forget it if cilantro is cooked with something... there's just no way plucking out the vile weed is going to eliminate the taste after that. Diced up and mixed with something is also a serious problem. Fortunately, it usually is just a last-minute garnish, which means it can be plucked from the food if spotted.
  #63  
Old 06-12-2016, 10:26 AM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
I believe that cooking changes starches into sugars.
I think it's something else that makes sweet potatoes nastier when cooked. The disgusting taste/aroma that cooked sweet taters have that raw ones don't is anything but sweet. It's definitely a malodorous effect.
  #64  
Old 06-14-2016, 05:53 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
It only makes some peoples' urine smell funky, not everyone's. Whether it funkifies your urine or not is a genetic trait. The people who say they can't smell it probably are not being funkified.
Actually that's an ongoing argument as to whether people don't produce the funk - or they do but can't smell it.

Regardless, I'm one of those who is affected and I blame Cecil Adams for this, as I had never noticed this until I read the Straight Dope column on the subject. I can eat cilantro just fine, for what it's worth.

Mushrooms, on the other hand. are pure EVIL INCARNATE and ruin any dish with their nasty rotting foulness and if you claim mushrooms are delicious you are wrong and evil and Satan's spawn .

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 06-14-2016 at 05:55 PM.
  #65  
Old 06-14-2016, 06:30 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Actually that's an ongoing argument as to whether people don't produce the funk - or they do but can't smell it.
I can smell the funk with some peoples' urine and not with other peoples' urine. Unless my olfactory senses are cutting in and out randomly I don't see any other explanation here.
  #66  
Old 06-14-2016, 08:51 PM
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Mushrooms, on the other hand. are pure EVIL INCARNATE and ruin any dish with their nasty rotting foulness and if you claim mushrooms are delicious you are wrong and evil and Satan's spawn .
Mushrooms absorb flavors and make a dish less spicy.
  #67  
Old 06-15-2016, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
Mushrooms absorb flavors and make a dish less spicy.
And yet they are unable to absorb their own awful flavor.
  #68  
Old 06-15-2016, 07:25 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Do cilantrophobes go into Indian restaurants and demand they leave out the curry?

In other morning wonderment: do cilantrophobes have the same reaction to papalo (another herb sometimes promoted as a cilantro substitute)? I've grown my own and made salsa with it. A little goes a long way, as it is (to me) kind of rank and musky in comparison to cilantro.

Last edited by Jackmannii; 06-15-2016 at 07:25 AM.
  #69  
Old 06-15-2016, 08:07 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Do cilantrophobes go into Indian restaurants and demand they leave out the curry?
I just don't go to Indian restaurants (although my lentil and pea allergies probably have more to do with that than cilantro).

Quote:
In other morning wonderment: do cilantrophobes have the same reaction to papalo (another herb sometimes promoted as a cilantro substitute)? I've grown my own and made salsa with it. A little goes a long way, as it is (to me) kind of rank and musky in comparison to cilantro.
Dunno - never tried it. Interesting question though. If I get a chance to test it I'll let you know the results.

I also want to add that I am not a cilantrophobe. I don't fear cilantro, I'm averse to it. Because to me it tastes like PineSol floor wash after being used to clean out a horse stable. If it tasted to you like it tastes to me you wouldn't like it, either.
  #70  
Old 06-15-2016, 08:07 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
I can smell the funk with some peoples' urine and not with other peoples' urine. Unless my olfactory senses are cutting in and out randomly I don't see any other explanation here.
Understood, but there are some studies that claim it's the smeller, not the pee-er.

In the "we all produce it, you just can't smell it" camp:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/1...n_6077006.html
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/wh...-eat-asparagus

In the "it's complicated" camp:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...mell-49961252/
Quote:
On the whole, the evidence is mixed. Initially, a pair of studies conducted in the 1980s with participants from France and Israel found that everyone produced the characteristic scent, and that a minority of people were simply unable to smell it. People with the ability to detect the scent, though, were able to smell it even in the urine of those who couldnít smell it, indicating that the differences were rooted in perception, not production.

More recent studies, though, suggest the issue is a bit more complicated. The most recent study, from 2010, found that differences existed between individuals in both the production and detection of the scent.

Overall, scientists now conclude that most of the difference is in perceptionóthat is, if your urine doesnít seem to smell any differently after you eat asparagus, itís likely that you simply canít perceive the sulfurous compoundsí foul odor, but thereís a small chance itís because your body digests asparagus in a way that reduces the concentration of these chemicals in your urine.
  #71  
Old 06-15-2016, 08:08 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
Mushrooms absorb flavors and make a dish less spicy.
Another argument against them!! Why have the spices in the food and then do something to reduce their taste!
  #72  
Old 06-15-2016, 08:09 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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In other words, people vary in both the amount of the funk produced and their ability to detect the amount produced.

So some people can always detect the funk, and some never can, and some can only detect it when it's above a certain concentration of funk.

Am I understanding that correctly?
  #73  
Old 06-15-2016, 08:50 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle View Post
Hmm. Maybe I should cut my son some slack.
As a kid I couldn't stand raw tomatoes - but it was texture, not taste. The slime/gel around the seeds grossed me out. Wash it out of the cut tomato and I was fine with the rest.
  #74  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:02 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
I just don't go to Indian restaurants (although my lentil and pea allergies probably have more to do with that than cilantro).
The point I was trying to make is that if one does not like a spice associated with a particular style of cooking, it is relatively easy to avoid that spice by foregoing the cooking style associated with it; ergo, if one doesn't like curry, stay away from Indian cooking. If cilantro is disliked, avoid Mexican restaurants.

Wonder why more people don't bitch and moan about not being able to detect the bitter almonds scent of cyanide (there's apparently a genetic component and substantial numbers of people can't smell it). Either none of my autopsied patients were ever poisoned by cyanide or I couldn't detect the aroma. I will never know.
  #75  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:10 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Not completely on-topic, maybe, but I cannot tolerate the lime leaf often used in Thai curries. It must taste good to someone or it wouldn't be used.

Not only does it taste like gasoline (not imagined - I've had siphoning accidents ) to me, but every part of my GI tract protests - nausea, indigestion, cramps, and the "green apple quickstep."

I like other Thai food, and Indian curries, and have no problem with them.
  #76  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:12 AM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
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Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
The point I was trying to make is that if one does not like a spice associated with a particular style of cooking, it is relatively easy to avoid that spice by foregoing the cooking style associated with it; ergo, if one doesn't like curry, stay away from Indian cooking. If cilantro is disliked, avoid Mexican restaurants.
Clinantro is also used in some Asian areas. Indian women sometimes use it as a perfume.
  #77  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:21 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Oddly enough, I don't mind the smell of it. I could see using it as a body scent. I just have trouble imagining anyone eating it. Although clearly people do eat it and enjoy it.
  #78  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:26 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Another one that hasn't been mentioned is Stevia. I use it as the only non-caloric sweetener that DOESN'T taste nasty to me, but some people apparently get a bitter taste from it.

To me, even if I get a "pure" taste from getting it in my mouth, it's just !!SWEET!! with no other tastes.
  #79  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:34 AM
Barbarian Barbarian is offline
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Do cilantrophobes go into Indian restaurants and demand they leave out the curry?
Cilantro is used everywhere now, not just in Indian restaurants.
My wife now warns every chef she is allergic to this trendy yet soapy-tasting leaf.

One adventure with an Epi-pen and a woman who cannot breath is enough, thank you.
  #80  
Old 06-15-2016, 09:46 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
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I resist pineapples because the acid burns my tongue for hours. Others love them.
  #81  
Old 06-15-2016, 11:27 AM
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Do cilantrophobes go into Indian restaurants and demand they leave out the curry?
Curry is a big problem for me. It might be okay if they only put 1/100th of the usual amount on a dish. But at regular strength it tastes like I'm getting a bucketful of spices in each bite. Just waaaay too much.

In addition, I can't then taste the food in the dish at all. It's completely overwhelmed. I don't see the point of that since we are hopefully past the age of trying to cover up the taste of rotted food.

Ordering reduced curry does nothing. They only cut back a tiny fraction. I have to go completely curry-free.
  #82  
Old 06-15-2016, 11:45 AM
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I also find that cilantro tastes soapy but still like it (in moderation), but that's in spite of the soapy component of the flavor, not because of it. I can still taste the other components of flavor, that are presumably the only part most folks taste, and I like them well enough that I put up with the soapy part.
I have wondered if the soapy-cilantro gene is dominant and so maybe can be expressed weakly if only one is present. Once in a while, especially in salsa where the cilantro is more-or-less raw, I'll get a weak soapy taste. Not enough to make me spit it out (In fact I kinda like it.) but I certainly get enough to sense what people are talking about.
  #83  
Old 06-15-2016, 12:00 PM
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In addition, I can't then taste the food in the dish at all. It's completely overwhelmed. I don't see the point of that since we are hopefully past the age of trying to cover up the taste of rotted food.
I am always surprised at how bland Mexican food is in a "real" restaurant.
Indian cooking from a recipe is bland for me, too.
  #84  
Old 06-15-2016, 12:24 PM
TheseGoToEleven TheseGoToEleven is offline
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ANY Artificial Sweetners

I'm surprised to only see one brief mention of Stevia here. For me, ANY artificial sweetener tastes like an chemical infusion of fake sweetness, which in fact it is, with a heavy emphasis on chemical. Soda, juice, candy, virtually anything that says "light" or "sugar-free", tastes vile and vaguely poisonous to me. And believe me, I've tried all of the Zero varieties, whether Coke or Vitamin Water or whatever. One taste and I'm done. I'd rather take cough syrup.
  #85  
Old 06-15-2016, 01:24 PM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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Originally Posted by clairobscur View Post
From what I read here, Brussel sprouts is an other example. Some people can taste their bitter taste, others can't.

Apparently, it's genetics, but it's not related to being a supertaster, who would notice all "weird" tastes in all foods. I notice the foul taste of cilantro, but I don't feel the bitter taste of Brussel sprouts.
The original story declared that it was due to a specific gene, but it turns out that it's slighly more complicated than that: http://www.livescience.com/39578-why...-broccoli.html
  #86  
Old 06-15-2016, 01:34 PM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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I am always surprised at how bland Mexican food is in a "real" restaurant.
'Americanized' Mexican food, can be very bland if you eat at the wrong restaurants. Tex-Mex and Cal-Mex is certainly not bland. It will also vary by the part of the country you are in (cooking in general, in the midwest, seems to be far more bland. Hell, Cal-Mex, at least way back when I was in College, was far more spicy than the mexican food I ever got in Mexico. Not that the restaurants in Mexico were bland, but they simply don't go as overboard with the spice as they do in California.

Heck, there's an infamous all-night burger chain in Southern California (least it was around back in the early '80s), called "Tommy's". If you asked for a burger, no specification of what to put on it, you'd get it with chilli and jalapenos every time, and it would keep you up all night with indigestion. New Orleans, and much of Florida can be like that as well (Well, I haven't been to either place recently -- this is from memory).

My brother took me out to a Mexican restaurant a few months ago and he wanted to try a new one, instead of the great one (with mariachis, and great food) that we used to go to all the time, and it was horribly bland.

You can't really generalize like that -- not all mexican food is bland.
  #87  
Old 06-15-2016, 01:40 PM
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Tortas Mexico. Run by, and basically to serve Mexican folks.
They serve hot sauce in a bottle on the side.
I do like 'real' tacos, shredded beef, the (by some) dreaded cilantro, chopped onions on the side and the bottles of pepper sauce, red and green.
  #88  
Old 06-15-2016, 04:50 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Originally Posted by DaphneBlack View Post
I want to know: is there an anti-supertaster?
Pretty much all elderly people.
It's quite common for many of us to have a greatly reduced sense of taste (and smell, which is a big part of taste).
  #89  
Old 06-15-2016, 05:47 PM
Kiyoshi Kiyoshi is offline
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Originally Posted by Lightnin' View Post
Most people say that celery doesn't have much flavor, if any at all.

Me, I say that celery is the taste equivalent of someone scratching their fingers down a chalkboard.
Not much flavour? I'm surprised. To me, celery has an overwhelmingly strong, unpleasant taste that I can only describe as "brown". Kind of like a very pungent, nasty spice.

I had a thread a few years ago about how I find cucumbers and melons overpoweringly bitter and disgusting. A few people agreed with me, but the vast majority said that they were almost flavorless. Since then however, I've discovered that I love butternut squash, so I wonder if cooking kills whatever chemical causes the bitter taste?

Oh and also, raw tomatoes are disgusting.
  #90  
Old 06-15-2016, 06:16 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by Kiyoshi View Post
Not much flavour? I'm surprised. To me, celery has an overwhelmingly strong, unpleasant taste that I can only describe as "brown". Kind of like a very pungent, nasty spice...
To Leopold Bloom, at least, according to Joyce, semen smelled like celery sauce. To round off this celery association, Molly remembers her afternoon:
...I wouldnt mind taking him in my mouth if nobody was looking as if it was asking you to suck it so clean and white he looks with his boyish face I would too in 1/2 a minute even if some of it went down what its only like gruel or the dew...
But we are far from cilantro now.


ETA: Kiyoshu, if it's not too much to ask, do you think semen smells like celery? Lightning also. Me, I've thought about it, and can see (smell) the connection.

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 06-15-2016 at 06:19 PM.
  #91  
Old 06-15-2016, 06:30 PM
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And yet they are unable to absorb their own awful flavor.
I'm really quite curious about the kind of mushrooms you've eaten. The reason is twofold. First, to most people mushrooms don't have much flavor at all. They're quite mild, and tend to soak up liquids which is one reason they absorb flavor. That said, mushrooms have quite different flavors (although again, mostly mild). The common white mushroom is really very different from the morel, and very different indeed from the truffle. Do these all taste the same to you?

Last edited by smiling bandit; 06-15-2016 at 06:34 PM.
  #92  
Old 06-15-2016, 06:36 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by MacLir View Post
As a kid I couldn't stand raw tomatoes - but it was texture, not taste. The slime/gel around the seeds grossed me out. Wash it out of the cut tomato and I was fine with the rest.
Me too, I always try to scrape out the seeds and goo. Everything else about tomatoes is delicious, raw and otherwise.
  #93  
Old 06-15-2016, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by TheseGoToEleven View Post
I'm surprised to only see one brief mention of Stevia here. For me, ANY artificial sweetener tastes like an chemical infusion of fake sweetness, which in fact it is, with a heavy emphasis on chemical. Soda, juice, candy, virtually anything that says "light" or "sugar-free", tastes vile and vaguely poisonous to me. And believe me, I've tried all of the Zero varieties, whether Coke or Vitamin Water or whatever. One taste and I'm done. I'd rather take cough syrup.
This in spades.

I tried "Mio", that drink flavor additive. "Add a little or add a lot". It tasted like paint, and it tingled.
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Old 06-16-2016, 09:14 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Originally Posted by TheseGoToEleven View Post
I'm surprised to only see one brief mention of Stevia here. For me, ANY artificial sweetener tastes like an chemical infusion of fake sweetness, which in fact it is, with a heavy emphasis on chemical. Soda, juice, candy, virtually anything that says "light" or "sugar-free", tastes vile and vaguely poisonous to me. And believe me, I've tried all of the Zero varieties, whether Coke or Vitamin Water or whatever. One taste and I'm done. I'd rather take cough syrup.
Obviously some sort of difference in taste receptors - I feel the same about saccharin and the "purely chemical" sweeteners, can tolerate Sucralose, since it is in fact sucrose modified to make it inassimilable, and have no problem with stevia. Although with the case of the concentrated taste mentioned earlier there is a "not-quite-right" element to the taste - not unpleasant, but sort of a gustatory "uncanny valley."

And it can vary with the use. I and others convinced a maker of high quality ginger ale to put out a version with stevia. The sugar version is great, other stevia sweetened sodas by the same maker are great, but the ginger ale was nasty. There must have been some interaction between the flavor elements from the ginger and the stevia, because it was not palatable.
  #95  
Old 06-16-2016, 09:48 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg View Post
Curry is a big problem for me. It might be okay if they only put 1/100th of the usual amount on a dish. But at regular strength it tastes like I'm getting a bucketful of spices in each bite. Just waaaay too much.

In addition, I can't then taste the food in the dish at all. It's completely overwhelmed. I don't see the point of that since we are hopefully past the age of trying to cover up the taste of rotted food.

Ordering reduced curry does nothing. They only cut back a tiny fraction. I have to go completely curry-free.
It sounds like you're objecting to the overall intensity of the spicing, which is indeed strong and complex. It seems that most people who don't like curry are actually objecting to cumin, which is a major ingredient in curries. For some, cumin smells like BO and tastes sour.
  #96  
Old 06-17-2016, 06:13 PM
67java89 67java89 is offline
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I love onions, but I have have an odd aversion to garlic. Even the smell of garlic bread baking makes me gag. It's like garlic isn't even a food. It's more like a chemical smell.

I have the cilantro/soap effect as well. On the other hand, I love the Brussels sprouts. They taste pleasant to me.
  #97  
Old 06-17-2016, 07:50 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
It sounds like you're objecting to the overall intensity of the spicing, which is indeed strong and complex. It seems that most people who don't like curry are actually objecting to cumin, which is a major ingredient in curries. For some, cumin smells like BO and tastes sour.
Cumin is fine- however, I have recently discovered that I do, in fact, like avocado. I had assumed that guacamole tasted so awful because of the avocado, but it turns out it's the cilantro in it that makes it vile.
  #98  
Old 06-17-2016, 08:10 PM
susan susan is offline
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Liking cantaloupe is genetic, according to 23andMe's research.
  #99  
Old 06-17-2016, 09:22 PM
cwthree cwthree is offline
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How has no one mentioned beets yet? Most people find that beets have a pleasant sweet vegetable flavor, but to some of us, they just taste like dirt (I'm in the "taste like dirt" population).
  #100  
Old 06-17-2016, 10:57 PM
susan susan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwthree View Post
they just taste like dirt
That's why I like 'em.
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