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  #51  
Old 08-30-2016, 01:18 AM
Isamu Isamu is offline
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Marry a locksmith, or always keep one in tow, that way when you are faced with a door that is locked you can ask them to pick the lock, and if it all turns out to be illegal anyway then they will take the fall instead of you.
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  #52  
Old 08-30-2016, 01:39 AM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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"Well, that's nice, honey, but my lockpicking tools are all in my toolbox...inside the house...on the other side of that locked door."
  #53  
Old 09-01-2016, 01:15 AM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Originally Posted by amaguri View Post
The one that comes to mind for me is using toothpaste to clean foggy/hazy headlights. Works like magic! I'm sure any paste with very fine grit works similarly but toothpaste is handy and smells good
Yep. Salt + baking soda works as well, and is much cheaper.
  #54  
Old 09-01-2016, 08:26 AM
Clothahump Clothahump is offline
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Originally Posted by amaguri View Post
The one that comes to mind for me is using toothpaste to clean foggy/hazy headlights. Works like magic! I'm sure any paste with very fine grit works similarly but toothpaste is handy and smells good
SCUBA divers have known that trick for years to keep the face mask from fogging. Has to be real toothpaste to be effective, though, not gel.
  #55  
Old 09-01-2016, 08:46 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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If you've got scratches on finished wood furniture, you can hide them by rubbing a piece of walnut on it. It'll gradually stain the scratched part until it matches the surroundings.
  #56  
Old 09-05-2016, 11:22 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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I've posted this elsewhere, but it's so effective and cheap, I try to pass it on whenever I can.

To get rid of fruit flies: Pour some apple cider vinegar (NOT regular vinegar) into a small bowl. Add a few drops of common dish soap. Stir lightly. Give it a day and you'll have fly corpses galore.
  #57  
Old 09-05-2016, 07:32 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleach View Post
Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by amarinth View Post
Am I the only person for whom this doesn't work? A square knot may be more secure than a granny knot (between macrame & tatting, I know the difference), but my shoelaces still end up untying themselves.
I heard about this a couple years ago, and have been using it. It usually works. The only time it doesn't is on some particularly slippery round shoelaces I had. They just wouldn't hold a knot.

I've also gone to shortening my laces on my shoes. The standard ones on tennis shoes are so long that even after double knotting, the ends and loops drag the ground, making it much more likely to step on them and pull the knot open.

Here's my hack - I don't cut the lace, because I want the ferrules on the ends to remain intact so I can feed them through the eyelets. So what I do is thread the shoe, center the lace, then pull some of the excess to the middle and tie it off in a loop knot. Then I as I'm lacing up, I feed the ends through the loop near the end to secure the loop in the slot above the tongue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ticker
I learned this from these very pages a few years ago and it is amazing. I no longer double-knot my laces yet they rarely come undone. One small improvement on the TED presentation. In the video Terry Moore tells you to reverse step #2 of lace-tying, making the bow. Much less awkward is to reverse step #1, the initial crossover-and-under. The result is the same but I believe it takes much less effort to unlearn-relearn.
The problem with that is when you get to the point to pull the loops tight, your hands are on the opposite sides from the direction you want to pull.


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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
Very difficult when the spaces are angled toward on-coming traffic. To back in, you have to reverse direction, which takes extra time and also extra space, blocking oncoming traffic, and even preventing someone behind you from going around you. It's glaringly less efficient for angled spaces.
Angled spots are a lot easier to pull into and back out of, because the turn is much smaller. Perpendicular slots require a sharp 90 deg turn. Sometimes in some parking lots because of other cars, traffic, people walking, etc, the lane you are turning from is narrow enough to make that right angle turn a chore.

But yes, it is important to realize that the turn is at the front and the back of the car trails, so it doesn't follow the front wheels directly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quimby View Post
A lot of those Life Hack lists suggest you peel a banana "upside down" i.e. not from the stem but by pinching the bottom and I am here to tell you that works and is how I peel bananas now.
I've heard that and tried it. The reasoning seems to be the stem provides a convenient handle. I find that I prefer having a pop top on the banana. By the time I'm down far enough on the banana for the lack of a handle to be an issue, I can just plop the rest in my mouth.


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Originally Posted by CookingWithGas View Post
Well, now, that's the trick then, isn't it?
Glass jars are fairly thick and fairly sturdy. Hitting the lid flat on a surface is not going to provide the kind of shock to break it that falling on a corner from ~3 ft up will.
  #58  
Old 09-05-2016, 08:07 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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I've posted this elsewhere, but it's so effective and cheap, I try to pass it on whenever I can.

To get rid of fruit flies: Pour some apple cider vinegar (NOT regular vinegar) into a small bowl. Add a few drops of common dish soap. Stir lightly. Give it a day and you'll have fly corpses galore.
That's funny. I've always heard you can catch more flies with honey. Another folk adage out the window.
  #59  
Old 09-05-2016, 09:14 PM
Turek Turek is offline
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Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
Here's my hack - I don't cut the lace, because I want the ferrules on the ends to remain intact so I can feed them through the eyelets.
Bolding added.

The word of the day is "aglet".
  #60  
Old 09-06-2016, 03:46 AM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Originally Posted by CookingWithGas View Post
That's funny. I've always heard you can catch more flies with honey. Another folk adage out the window.
Actually, you can catch more flies with shit.
  #61  
Old 09-06-2016, 07:50 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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The way I deal with excess shoelace is that I tie them once, and then feed the loose ends through the last set of laceholes (which I probably wasn't using anyway), and put an overhand knot in each of the loose ends so they won't pull back through. This has a few effects: It uses up extra length, it prevents most of the common ways shoelace knots get tangled, and it means that the laces always stay half-tied, so I never have to stop and think about which way to make that first overhand knot to make it a square knot (I could adjust the second part to compensate, but that's more ingrained in muscle memory).
  #62  
Old 09-06-2016, 09:00 AM
Dragwyr Dragwyr is offline
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I've started tying my shoelaces with a Shoelace Surgeon's Knot rather than a regular shoelace knot and I've never had them come untied since.
  #63  
Old 09-06-2016, 09:14 AM
Whiskey Dickens Whiskey Dickens is offline
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Originally Posted by jsgoddess View Post
I didn't think people were still keeping it around the house after the aspiration dangers became known.

I was about to jump in to say "what aspiration dangers? Are you thinking of baby POWDER instead?"

I googled baby oil aspiration before posting just to be sure, and all I have to say is holy shit!

Never would have guessed! Ignorance fought!
  #64  
Old 09-06-2016, 11:17 AM
betterlifethroughchemistry betterlifethroughchemistry is offline
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Originally Posted by billfish678 View Post
I'm just amazed that it is always MY town where these brilliant people have figured this stuff out. I must live in the Eureka of the Deep South.

Heating lemons in a the microwave for a bit does seem to help in getting the juice out.

I had to work with some epoxy the other day. Invariably I got some on me. My usual go to for getting gunk like that off is mineral spirits or gasoline or acetone or whatever other nasty solvent is handy. Often with on so so results.

I recently read somewhere that white vinegar worked. Well damn if it didn't remove that stuff better than most things I've used before. And its dirt cheap a gallon at a time too. Will try that from now on for most nasty expoxies, glues, and paints from now on first.
We make high-end, OEM adhesives and sealants for energy and electronics applications. There are multiple chemical resistance tests some of our materials have to pass, and one in particular is a UL test which includes resistance to 10% acetic acid, which is essentially vinegar. If not formulated properly, the 10% acetic acid will destroy an epoxy compound in days where strong organic solvents won't touch them.
  #65  
Old 09-06-2016, 04:41 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is offline
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Speaking of vinegar (which I was too, in my other post) I find it is the o-n-l-y thing that gets hardened dog spit off of the dogs' bowls and bowl holders. Dog spit is only a few molecules away from epoxy.
  #66  
Old 09-06-2016, 04:45 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I saw this one on America's Test Kitchen and was dubious, but it worked.

Perfect soft-boiled eggs:

Bring one-half inch (no more) of water to boil in a saucepan. Put eggs in. Cover pan. Cook exactly six minutes.

They come out perfectly every time. Even if they're ice-cold when they go in the pan, they never crack because they're mostly cooking in hot steam, which isn't hot enough to crack a cold egg.

Last edited by teela brown; 09-06-2016 at 04:46 PM.
  #67  
Old 09-06-2016, 06:03 PM
Elemenopy Elemenopy is offline
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Bump, that's how I generally cut onions, too. It also makes nicer strips if you skip the cross-cut part.

On that note, I recently learned a better way to prep bell peppers. I used to chop off the top, rinse the seeds out, cut it in half, trim off the white spines, and then clumsily go to town. Nope. Instead, hold the stem and just slice around the outside, leaving the spines attached to the top and bottom. Discard. (Slice off the bottom, too, if it's large enough to bother with) Now you've got a nice long rectangle and no seed mess. Slice into batons and if you need dice, crosscut those in two batches.

I highly recommend Henckel's book on knife technique. I even worked prep in a diner ages ago and still picked up some new tricks.

Don't soak your crusty pans; after dinner, boil them for a bit with some soapy water for about 10 minutes or so. Use a wooden spoon (or a scrubby sponge rubber-banded to the spoon) to scrub right away.

Ok, moving on from cooking. Someone mentioned covering wood scratches with a walnut. Crayons or oil pastel (cheaper is better in this case) are even better. You can seal this well enough with a bit of egg white on a paintbrush if you want.

Also, a few light coats of cheapo hairspray is a great protectant for pencil or charcoal sketches or even letters you might want to save. This extends beyond kids' artwork, too. Want to paint over something that you've sketched on? For instance, a stencil on your wall or a craft project. If you don't seal it, your lines will probably smudge and muddy up your paint. Just bust out the Aqua Net. Yes, there are products designed for this purpose, but they cost 10x as much as hairspray and don't really work any better.

Another crafty thing that the less crafty may not have run across. Instead of making stencils or tracing, you can transfer patterns from inkjet printouts onto more durable surfaces like wood with rubbing alcohol or craft glue. Google this because the exact method will depend on what your finished medium will be, but it's super easy.

Magic (melamine) sponges are great for tea or coffee stains/residue.

Sharpie markers are fantastic for hiding bleach spots on dark fabric, at least for everyday fabrics OR deep shoe or other leather scuffs (before polishing as normal). They do come in colors other than black, as well.

When you get a new gadget with a specific power adapter or other cable (as in, not generic USB), fold a sticky label or length of masking tape in half over the cord and write on it what gadget it is intended for. This has saved a lot of time for us, especially having moved a million times.
  #68  
Old 09-06-2016, 07:01 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by Elemenopy View Post
. . . When you get a new gadget with a specific power adapter or other cable (as in, not generic USB), fold a sticky label or length of masking tape in half over the cord and write on it what gadget it is intended for. This has saved a lot of time for us, especially having moved a million times.
There are lots of us who are labelling fanatics. I label all sorts of things. (Poor memory!)
  #69  
Old 09-06-2016, 07:14 PM
Personal Personal is online now
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I'd add to the Sharpie marker trick to hide bleach spots in dark clothing, liquid white out works great at the office to cover that pen mark that appears on your chest or collar in the morning when you're wearing a white shirt.

Last edited by Personal; 09-06-2016 at 07:14 PM.
  #70  
Old 09-07-2016, 01:35 PM
TRC4941 TRC4941 is offline
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Originally Posted by teela brown View Post
I saw this one on America's Test Kitchen and was dubious, but it worked.

Perfect soft-boiled eggs:

Bring one-half inch (no more) of water to boil in a saucepan. Put eggs in. Cover pan. Cook exactly six minutes.

They come out perfectly every time. Even if they're ice-cold when they go in the pan, they never crack because they're mostly cooking in hot steam, which isn't hot enough to crack a cold egg.
The easiest way ever for hard "boiled" eggs - Place eggs in a muffin/cupcake pan. Put in a preheated 350 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Immerse in cold water after baking.
  #71  
Old 09-07-2016, 03:26 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
The easiest way ever for hard "boiled" eggs - Place eggs in a muffin/cupcake pan. Put in a preheated 350 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Immerse in cold water after baking.
Um... I have to assume you're joking... What really would happen? Wouldn't they burst open and then burn to little ugly crisps?
  #72  
Old 09-07-2016, 04:39 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
Um... I have to assume you're joking... What really would happen? Wouldn't they burst open and then burn to little ugly crisps?
No, I just heard this too and my co-worker swears by it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
So what works to take off the residue of sticky-gum when you've peeled the price-tag off the front of a paperback book?
Olive oil.
  #73  
Old 09-07-2016, 06:21 PM
mistymage mistymage is offline
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If your hands stink after cutting up onions you can just rub your hands on the stainless steel faucet (use some water to get your hands wet beforehand). They sell stainless steel bars that do the same thing but I prefer stuff already on hand. The odor goes away almost instantly.
  #74  
Old 09-08-2016, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Dragwyr View Post
I've started tying my shoelaces with a Shoelace Surgeon's Knot rather than a regular shoelace knot and I've never had them come untied since.
A couple years ago I tried out something I think is called saddle lacing on my sneakers. Works amazing well. More comfortable and they don't come undone. Can't find a link to it. (Too many hits for horse saddles or saddle shoes.) Your link doesn't seem to cover this at all!

The idea is at for a string to go thru the last two holes on the same side at the top. The opposite string then threads thru the other string between the two holes and back to tie the knot. Regular lacing of the rest of the shoe and a standard knot.
  #75  
Old 09-08-2016, 12:42 PM
Nars Glinley Nars Glinley is offline
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Originally Posted by Personal View Post
I watched that a few years ago and implemented it. Previously, my laces would untie fairly often. Since my change per his instruction, it hasn't happened once. I still haven't told my parents though.
I tie the traditional knot but go around my thumb twice. They never come untied until you pull on a loose end.
  #76  
Old 09-08-2016, 01:42 PM
Spice Weasel Spice Weasel is offline
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Originally Posted by Elemenopy View Post
Don't soak your crusty pans; after dinner, boil them for a bit with some soapy water for about 10 minutes or so. Use a wooden spoon (or a scrubby sponge rubber-banded to the spoon) to scrub right away.
Based on your suggestion, today I tried this with the steel pot inside my pressure cooker. Worked like a charm.
  #77  
Old 09-09-2016, 09:17 AM
TRC4941 TRC4941 is offline
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Um... I have to assume you're joking... What really would happen? Wouldn't they burst open and then burn to little ugly crisps?
Nope!! The eggs come out just like you boiled them! My husband does a dozen like this every week. I don't think I've ever even seen one crack.
  #78  
Old 09-09-2016, 03:59 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Can somebody else help me out here? Is this a king-sized whoosh? I'm really having trouble believing it, but I honestly don't know enough about baking to know.

I am not trying it myself!
  #79  
Old 09-09-2016, 04:22 PM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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Dog saliva will help prevent the eggs from cracking, just have your dogs pre-lick the eggs before baking.
  #80  
Old 09-09-2016, 05:04 PM
Nars Glinley Nars Glinley is offline
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Can somebody else help me out here? Is this a king-sized whoosh? I'm really having trouble believing it, but I honestly don't know enough about baking to know.

I am not trying it myself!
It got 3.5 stars on allrecipes so there must be something to it.
  #81  
Old 09-09-2016, 05:56 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Can somebody else help me out here? Is this a king-sized whoosh? I'm really having trouble believing it, but I honestly don't know enough about baking to know.

I am not trying it myself!
I have not done it but I see no reason it wouldn't work. Do not do this in the microwave.

There is this ideal among chefs to make the 160F egg, or whatever temperatures. The chemistry is that what matters is the temperature, not how long you cook it. If you bake an egg in a highly stable, well-calibrated oven at that lower-than-boiling temperature you will get an egg with a nice creamy texture. You could do the same thing in water if you monitor the temperature like a hawk.
  #82  
Old 09-09-2016, 06:22 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by Nars Glinley View Post
It got 3.5 stars on allrecipes so there must be something to it.
Holy Hannah! TRC4941, I apologize! I thought sure you were pulling a leg. 350 degrees? I would have thought you'd bake the stuff permanently all over the inside of your oven.

(I'm still not going to do this!)
  #83  
Old 09-09-2016, 06:33 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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The easiest way ever for hard "boiled" eggs - Place eggs in a muffin/cupcake pan. Put in a preheated 350 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Immerse in cold water after baking.
Seems like an incredible waste of energy -- you heat the whole oven up to 350 just to get a few eggs up to 212? Can't see how thgat would be easier or faster than just heating a small pot of water to boiling and putting the eggs in that.
  #84  
Old 09-09-2016, 09:45 PM
Enola Straight Enola Straight is offline
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Ever get in a fender-bender and only got a little paint transfer?

That is, you got some of their paint on your car, but underneath, your paintjob is still ok?

Get a kleenex or paper napkin, pop the hood and dab the napkin in the power brakes resovoir, and buff away the scuff with the brake fluid (you'll only need a few drops, and buff the area ABSOLUTELY CLEAN).
  #85  
Old 09-11-2016, 09:19 PM
USNSPARKS USNSPARKS is offline
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Easiest and quickest hard boiled eggs

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Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
The easiest way ever for hard "boiled" eggs - Place eggs in a muffin/cupcake pan. Put in a preheated 350 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Immerse in cold water after baking.
I make them in my electric pressure cooker. I set 6 on a rack I've put inside, add 1 cup water and set the time for 5 minutes. Takes roughly 7 mins to get up to pressure + 5 mins to cook, then I let them set for 5 more minutes. Release any left over pressure and pop the top. Put the eggs in a bowl of ice water using tongs. Is about half the time and a lot easier. Course it only works with a pressure cooker. I assume it will work on a pressure cooker you use on a stove top but I don't know if you can even buy them any more.
  #86  
Old 09-12-2016, 11:22 AM
Cyros Cyros is offline
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Originally Posted by Dragwyr View Post
I've started tying my shoelaces with a Shoelace Surgeon's Knot rather than a regular shoelace knot and I've never had them come untied since.
I swear by Ian's Secure Shoelace Knot from that same site. It has never let me down. I taught it to my daughter when she was learning to tie her shoes after one day of her having to retie her laces over and over again. No more having to tell her that her shoelaces are undone for the 3rd time in 5 minutes!
  #87  
Old 09-12-2016, 12:52 PM
The Great Unwashed The Great Unwashed is offline
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Traces from permanent markers inadvertently used on a white-board can be removed by retracing over them (a few inches at a time) with a dry-wipe marker, then erasing.

That's it, that is the sum total of my wisdom gained on this planet.
  #88  
Old 09-12-2016, 01:13 PM
TheseGoToEleven TheseGoToEleven is offline
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Cooking/shucking corn. Leave the husk and silk intact. Grill or nuke the corn. When it's hot, cut off the thick end of the cob, squeeze from the silk end until the ear pops out from the cut end. Throw away the silk and husk in one chunk.
Worked like a charm - even better than I expected! Maybe two stray silk strands left behind, which I'd say is less than the usual count on corn shucked the the old-fashioned way. And way less mess!

Just be sure to cut off enough of the bottom, and wear an oven mitt or use a towel when performing the squeeze. That corn is HOT, and the bare-handed approach is quickly deprecated in practice...
  #89  
Old 09-12-2016, 03:02 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Originally Posted by Enola Straight View Post
Ever get in a fender-bender and only got a little paint transfer?

That is, you got some of their paint on your car, but underneath, your paintjob is still ok?

Get a kleenex or paper napkin, pop the hood and dab the napkin in the power brakes resovoir, and buff away the scuff with the brake fluid (you'll only need a few drops, and buff the area ABSOLUTELY CLEAN).
What happens to my paint underneath?
  #90  
Old 09-13-2016, 12:27 PM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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What happens to my paint underneath?
It's brake fluid - it knows when to stop.
  #91  
Old 09-14-2016, 03:07 AM
Uncle Brother Walker Uncle Brother Walker is offline
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Well, now, that's the trick then, isn't it?
I've always found that smacking it on the base of your palm works just as well. You just have to pound it. Learn your own pain tolerance. Once should be enough.
  #92  
Old 09-15-2016, 11:37 AM
gigi gigi is offline
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It's brake fluid - it knows when to stop.
<groan>
  #93  
Old 09-15-2016, 12:23 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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I've always found that smacking it on the base of your palm works just as well. You just have to pound it. Learn your own pain tolerance. Once should be enough.
I'm not following your quote link to figure out what you're replying to: it's funnier that way
  #94  
Old 09-15-2016, 01:19 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Originally Posted by bleach View Post
Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
I've been tying my shoes Moore's way for more than 70 years. How did my mother know so much? My shoes never come untied unless the laces are too long and I step on the ends.

What he described is basically a Granny with loops, and by reversing the overhandedness of one of the steps, it become the square knot it is supposed to be, with loops.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-15-2016 at 01:20 PM.
  #95  
Old 09-15-2016, 01:22 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
I'm no cook, so I've not tried this myself. But I understand that peeling onions under water in the sink will eliminate the "crying" or tears effect.
Just keep them in the fridge. No tears when peeling or cutting cold onions.
  #96  
Old 09-15-2016, 08:32 PM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Personal View Post
I watched that a few years ago and implemented it. Previously, my laces would untie fairly often. Since my change per his instruction, it hasn't happened once. I still haven't told my parents though.
About 8 years ago, I was having problems with my shoes coming untied. Google to the rescue!

What I learned that day matched the TED talk video. The problem was that I was already tying my laces the correct way. (The correct way is to tie them as if you were making a square knot -- right over left, left over right.) Then I began to realize that if there is insufficient tension at the bottom of the knot, the knot can come undone on its own. Snugging up the laces before you start tying the knot helps, but I still have to pull the starting knot tight before completing the bows, else I will find myself retying my shoes.
  #97  
Old 09-15-2016, 11:03 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Location: NH
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If you get rust stains from your washing machine on your clothes, soak them in lemon juice - from real lemons or a bottle of concentrate - and lay them out in the sun on a bright sunny day. The stains magically disappear. Only seems to work on rust, though.
  #98  
Old 09-16-2016, 07:40 AM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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Or stuff the clothing in a pan of water and rusty nails until the color is uniform. New shirt!
  #99  
Old 09-22-2016, 10:52 AM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota US
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This isn't so much a "trick" as a thing I didn't know was possible until recently. There's a kind of knot called a bowline on a bight. I've known about it since Boy Scout days, but I thought it of dubious utility because I knew of no way to tie it without passing the entire length of the rope through the knot. Imagine my surprise then to stumble across a way to tie it in the middle of a rope without having to work with the free ends.
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