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Old 08-15-2016, 02:38 PM
Hocus Pocus Hocus Pocus is offline
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Looking For Time Travel Books

I recently read A Murder In Time, which has a female modern day FBI agent transported back to 19th century England & helps solve some murders despite her specialization in IT. I'd like to find additional books like this where modern day people are transported back to 1500-1800's. Any suggestions?
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Old 08-15-2016, 02:39 PM
Maggie the Ocelot Maggie the Ocelot is offline
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The Outlander series comes immediately to mind.
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Old 08-15-2016, 02:54 PM
Last Glacial Maximum Last Glacial Maximum is offline
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"Timeline" by Crichton was a good read.

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Old 08-15-2016, 03:01 PM
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Meeting your exact criteria but nonetheless probably not what you're looking for would be the 1632 series.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1632_series
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:04 PM
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The obvious ones are Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog and The Doomsday Book. The first is sort of a mystery and involves travel back to the 19th century. It's lighthearted and very funny.

The second takes place in the same universe and involves travel to the time just before the bubonic plague hit in England. It is not lighthearted and funny.

Last edited by cher3; 08-15-2016 at 03:05 PM.
  #6  
Old 08-15-2016, 03:06 PM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
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To Say Nothing Of The Dog — oops, ninja'd!
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:11 PM
PastTense PastTense is offline
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Jack Finney. Time and Again
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When advertising artist Si Morley is recruited to join a covert government operation exploring the possibility of time travel, he jumps at the chance to leave his twentieth-century existence and step into New York City in January 1882. Aside from his thirst for experience, he has good reason to return to the past—his friend Kate has a curious, half-burned letter dated from that year, and he wants to trace the mystery.

But when Si begins to fall in love with a woman he meets in the past, he will be forced to choose between two worlds—forever.

Time and Again is admired for its rich, painstakingly researched descriptions of life in New York City more than a century ago, and for the swift adventure at its core. With digitally remastered art, fall in love with this refreshed classic all over again.
https://www.amazon.com/Time-Again-Ja...dp/0684801051/
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:15 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is online now
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One of my favorite books is "If I Never Get Back" by Daryl Brock. A modern-day reporter travels back in time to hang out with one of the first professional baseball teams in 1869. It's historical fiction as all the players are real. He also hangs out with Mark Twain.

Erm...must love sports.
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:16 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Robert Aspirin/Linda Evans - The Time Scout books.

Poul Anderson - Time Patrol

Not quite what the OP is asking for, but excellent anyway. And of course there is always Eric Flint's 163X universe.

Last edited by silenus; 08-15-2016 at 03:18 PM.
  #10  
Old 08-15-2016, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cher3 View Post
The obvious ones are Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog and The Doomsday Book. The first is sort of a mystery and involves travel back to the 19th century. It's lighthearted and very funny.

The second takes place in the same universe and involves travel to the time just before the bubonic plague hit in England. It is not lighthearted and funny.
Willis's duology Blackout/All Clear is extremely good. There's a lot in Blackout that is annoying and frustrating, but when you get to All Clear, realize there was a reason for it all.

It's one of several books Willis has written about time travel to London during the Blitz.
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:52 PM
Hocus Pocus Hocus Pocus is offline
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TY all for the suggestions.

To be a little more specific, I'm not into scifi per se. I'm also not looking for someone to be zipping around multiple time periods. More of going back to one particular time (voluntary or not) & how they relate to/deal with life in that era.
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:57 PM
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You might try "The Eyre Affair" by Jasper Fforde. I'm not sure it exactly fits the requirements of the OP, but I'd call it close enough, and it's a fun and entertaining read.
  #13  
Old 08-15-2016, 04:18 PM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is offline
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Do you like romance? "Outlander" series, already mentioned, is very popular. Lynn Kurland's books are almost all time travel romance.

Can you specify genres that you like - that would help.
  #14  
Old 08-15-2016, 04:28 PM
Waltzes with Cacti Waltzes with Cacti is offline
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Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.
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Old 08-15-2016, 05:40 PM
cher3 cher3 is offline
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Originally Posted by Hocus Pocus View Post
TY all for the suggestions.

To be a little more specific, I'm not into scifi per se. I'm also not looking for someone to be zipping around multiple time periods. More of going back to one particular time (voluntary or not) & how they relate to/deal with life in that era.
In that case, you might actually like The Doomsday Book. It starts out as intentional/sci-fi-type time travel, but things go wrong, and it's mostly about how the main character deals with the fact that she may have to live (or die) in the past. It's grim, in a lot of ways, but the author's take on the ways that we might be both similar and different to people living in the 14th century are interesting.
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Old 08-15-2016, 07:18 PM
Doug K. Doug K. is offline
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Replay by Ken Grimwood.

A man dies of a heart attack at his desk, then wakes up back in college, but with all his memories of his life intact.
  #17  
Old 08-15-2016, 07:28 PM
E-DUB E-DUB is offline
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While "Replay" is a spectacular work, it doesn't meet the OP's criteria.
  #18  
Old 08-15-2016, 08:21 PM
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The Anubis Gates, Tim Powers
The Big Time, Fritz Leiber
  #19  
Old 08-15-2016, 09:05 PM
The Stainless Steel Rat The Stainless Steel Rat is online now
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Originally Posted by Hocus Pocus View Post
TY all for the suggestions.

To be a little more specific, I'm not into scifi per se. I'm also not looking for someone to be zipping around multiple time periods. More of going back to one particular time (voluntary or not) & how they relate to/deal with life in that era.
The 1632 series has already been mentioned above. I takes a West Virginia town circa 2000 and transplants it (The only SF part of the story) to Central Germany in June 1631, smack in the middle of the 30 Years War. Outside of that, everything is played reasonably straight with no real SF, just what a town of 3,500 people would have in the year 2000 (you might disagree with some of the changes the author postulates, but YMMV).

I'd suggest reading the first book, 1632 by Eric Flint. It can be read as a stand-alone novel if you decide it is not worth pursuing, but they are up to about 15 novels (counting spin-offs) and quite literally hundreds of stories, so if you get hooked, it might take awhile...
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Old 08-16-2016, 06:53 PM
TonySinclair TonySinclair is offline
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Originally Posted by cher3 View Post
In that case, you might actually like The Doomsday Book. It starts out as intentional/sci-fi-type time travel, but things go wrong, and it's mostly about how the main character deals with the fact that she may have to live (or die) in the past. It's grim, in a lot of ways, but the author's take on the ways that we might be both similar and different to people living in the 14th century are interesting.
Yeah, I can't figure out why people like that book, unless they just ignore everything that happens in the present. I guess the part in the past is decent historical fiction, but the part in the present is the worst sci-fi I've ever read.
  #21  
Old 08-16-2016, 07:01 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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Stephen King's 11/22/1963 is a book I would recommend to anyone.
  #22  
Old 08-16-2016, 07:04 PM
Peremensoe Peremensoe is offline
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Originally Posted by Hocus Pocus View Post
TY all for the suggestions.

To be a little more specific, I'm not into scifi per se. I'm also not looking for someone to be zipping around multiple time periods. More of going back to one particular time (voluntary or not) & how they relate to/deal with life in that era.
Then I second the recommendations of Time and Again (a classic, which also has mystery and romance elements) and If I Never Get Back (provided you like baseball).
  #23  
Old 08-16-2016, 07:43 PM
SCAdian SCAdian is offline
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Lest Darkness Fall, by L Sprague de Camp.

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There's a sequel: From Time to Time.
  #24  
Old 08-17-2016, 04:27 PM
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You might like H. Beam Piper's Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen even though it's technically not time travel. A Pennsylvania state trooper is accidentally picked up by a dimensional traveler, and dropped off on a parallel Earth that's technologically still at a Renaissance level. His limited knowledge of science (in particular, the manufacture of gunpowder and firearms) makes him a very important man.

Oh, and here's another vote for Finney's Time and Again. A friend of mine once described it as "science fiction for non-science fiction fans."

Last edited by Cartoonacy; 08-17-2016 at 04:28 PM.
  #25  
Old 08-17-2016, 09:10 PM
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The Anubis Gates, Tim Powers
The Big Time, Fritz Leiber
Seconding Anubis Gates. Not sci-fi, exactly. More of a steampunk fantasy but really, really good.

Also recommending The Mummy, Or Ramsey The Damned by Ann Rice. In this, the mummy time travels to 1914 and must come to terms with that times, ah, times.
  #26  
Old 08-17-2016, 09:20 PM
E-DUB E-DUB is offline
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My wife likes "Time and Again", and she hates SF.
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Old 08-17-2016, 10:31 PM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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Stephen King's 11/22/1963 is a book I would recommend to anyone.
Was a very good book.
  #28  
Old 08-17-2016, 10:50 PM
SmartAleq SmartAleq is offline
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Deborah Harkness' All Souls Trilogy. The middle book especially fits the criteria of the OP exactly. Ignore the supernatural creature angle, it works in book and isn't annoying.

Jodi Taylor's Chronicles of St Mary's fits the bill and the books are funny and a cracking good read all through.
  #29  
Old 08-18-2016, 04:38 AM
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Stephen King's 11/22/1963 is a book I would recommend to anyone.
Seconded. I couldn't put it down. Although I believe it's just called 11/22/63.
  #30  
Old 08-18-2016, 08:15 AM
BobLibDem BobLibDem is online now
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Stephen King's 11/22/1963 is a book I would recommend to anyone.
I agree. This was only my second King book, having only read Under the Dome previously (which wasn't quite as stinky as the miniseries, but still boring). Still, I have to think I'd have found a better way to stop Oswald, such as calling the freaking Secret Service.
  #31  
Old 08-18-2016, 09:08 AM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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Originally Posted by Hocus Pocus View Post
TY all for the suggestions.

To be a little more specific, I'm not into scifi per se. I'm also not looking for someone to be zipping around multiple time periods. More of going back to one particular time (voluntary or not) & how they relate to/deal with life in that era.
The best in that genre is probably the classic Lest Darkness Fall.

https://www.amazon.com/Lest-Darkness...+darkness+fall

It is often cited as the inspiration for many, many modern authors.

The set-up is very simple: a man who is an expert in Roman History gets zapped back to 5th century Rome, during the era of the invasion of Gothic Italy by the Byzantine general Belisarius ... and attempts to actively change the course of history.

It's compulsive readable and sounds like exactly what you are looking for.

Edit: the actual method of "zapping" isn't explained. It just happens. So no science-fiction whatsoever (at least, not much).

Last edited by Malthus; 08-18-2016 at 09:11 AM.
  #32  
Old 08-18-2016, 09:29 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
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One of my favorite books is "If I Never Get Back" by Daryl Brock. A modern-day reporter travels back in time to hang out with one of the first professional baseball teams in 1869. It's historical fiction as all the players are real. He also hangs out with Mark Twain.

Erm...must love sports.
A thousand times this. Not your standard time travel tale it's great.
  #33  
Old 08-18-2016, 09:36 AM
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If you run across Leo Frankowski's "The Cross Time Engineer", keep on running. It is nothing but the most blatant masturbatory MarySue-ism ever put on paper.
  #34  
Old 08-18-2016, 09:39 AM
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Personally I think King's 11/22/63 became very long winded. The domestic problems of the Oswalds became tedious fairly quickly but it was still an enjoyable read. Years ago I really enjoyed Stanley Shapiro's A Time To Remember:

David Russell, a Dallas schoolteacher is still in mourning for his older brother who was killed in Vietnam twenty years before. He meets eccentric physicist, Dr. Hendrik Koopman who has built a time machine. Russell convinces Dr. Koopman to send him back to November 22, 1963 so that he can stop Lee Harvey Oswald from killing Kennedy, certain that had JFK lived, there would have been no Vietnam War.
  #35  
Old 08-18-2016, 11:20 AM
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If you run across Leo Frankowski's "The Cross Time Engineer", keep on running. It is nothing but the most blatant masturbatory MarySue-ism ever put on paper.
Aw, you're just jealous because

SPOILER:
you couldn't build a fleet of fighter planes in 13th-century Poland.
  #36  
Old 08-18-2016, 12:30 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
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Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
The best in that genre is probably the classic Lest Darkness Fall.

https://www.amazon.com/Lest-Darkness...+darkness+fall

It is often cited as the inspiration for many, many modern authors.

The set-up is very simple: a man who is an expert in Roman History gets zapped back to 5th century Rome, during the era of the invasion of Gothic Italy by the Byzantine general Belisarius ... and attempts to actively change the course of history.

It's compulsive readable and sounds like exactly what you are looking for.

Edit: the actual method of "zapping" isn't explained. It just happens. So no science-fiction whatsoever (at least, not much).
And it's available in a nice collection with several stories that were inspired by it (including Pohl's "The Deadly Mission of Phineas Snodgrass") https://www.amazon.com/Lest-Darkness...4S4#nav-subnav
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Old 08-18-2016, 12:39 PM
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To Say Nothing Of The Dog — oops, ninja'd!
I liked it.
  #38  
Old 08-18-2016, 01:07 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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Aw, you're just jealous because

SPOILER:
you couldn't build a fleet of fighter planes in 13th-century Poland.
The Tiffany Aching stuff gets a bit Mary Sue-ish, but the only contender I know of for Frankowski's title is the whole Mortal Instruments series, where the Mary Sue is named Claire and the author's last name is CLARE. Move along, nothing to see here...
  #39  
Old 08-19-2016, 02:48 PM
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If you don't mind something that's tongue-in-cheek and set a bit earlier than the range mentioned in the OP, there's Harry Harrison's The Technicolor Time Machine: a scientist gets funding for his time-travel experiments from a Hollywood producer whose goal is to shoot a drama about the Vikings' discovery of Vinland (America)... on location, with real Vikings.
  #40  
Old 08-19-2016, 04:23 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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The Guns of the South by Harry Turtledove, in which a group of people from the 1990's go back to the American Civil War to help the South win.
  #41  
Old 08-19-2016, 07:37 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is offline
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
One of my favorite books is "If I Never Get Back" by Daryl Brock. A modern-day reporter travels back in time to hang out with one of the first professional baseball teams in 1869. It's historical fiction as all the players are real. He also hangs out with Mark Twain.
Let me guess, he inspires Twain to write Connecticut Yankee, right?
  #42  
Old 08-19-2016, 08:36 PM
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Harry Harrison's "A Rebel in Time" also deals with a time traveler looking to help the south win the Civil War and the black army officer who goes back to stop him. Written years before that book by the other Harry.

Would have loved to see this one made into a movie. At the time I read it I was picturing John Vernon (Dean Wormer) and Denzel as the antagonists.
  #43  
Old 08-19-2016, 08:42 PM
Left Hand of Dorkness Left Hand of Dorkness is offline
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The best I've ever read in this specific genre is Kindred, by the amazing Octavia Butler. A modern black woman is involuntarily transported back to the antebellum South, where she meets her white father and black mother.
  #44  
Old 08-19-2016, 10:32 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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A modern black woman is involuntarily transported back to the antebellum South, where she meets her white father and black mother.
How can she be modern and have parents in the antebellum?
  #45  
Old 08-20-2016, 12:24 AM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is offline
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It looks like they were her direct ancestors, not her parents.

Last edited by Sunny Daze; 08-20-2016 at 12:25 AM.
  #46  
Old 08-20-2016, 01:16 AM
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The Guns of the South by Harry Turtledove, in which a group of people from the 1990's go back to the American Civil War to help the South win.
The group of people is from South Africa, and they are from farther up than the 90s. They wanted the South to survive so they could keep apartheid going.
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  #47  
Old 08-20-2016, 09:00 AM
Left Hand of Dorkness Left Hand of Dorkness is offline
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How can she be modern and have parents in the antebellum?
Sorry about that, brainfart. Yes, her ancestors, not her mom and dad.
  #48  
Old 08-20-2016, 01:10 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
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The group of people is from South Africa, and they are from farther up than the 90s. They wanted the South to survive so they could keep apartheid going.
Yeah, they are from 2014 or so, as I recall (they can only travel back exactly 150 years, for reasons that must be derived from the first principles of physics)
  #49  
Old 08-20-2016, 01:45 PM
cmyk cmyk is offline
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"The Bishop's Bird Stump!"

Here's a few modern ones I've read this year:

"Bones of the Earth" by Michael Swanwick.

And the more lighthearted, yet very imaginative, fun and well written "In Times Like These" trilogy by Nathan Van Coops.

Also, one of my more resent favorites, "The Accidental Time Machine" by Joe Haldeman.
  #50  
Old 08-20-2016, 02:12 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Willis's duology Blackout/All Clear is extremely good. There's a lot in Blackout that is annoying and frustrating, but when you get to All Clear, realize there was a reason for it all.

It's one of several books Willis has written about time travel to London during the Blitz.
Blackout/All Clear made me cry.

Bring the Jubilee, about a world where the South won the Civil War, and a Northerner goes back in time to observe the events of the war which led to the Southern victory, only to interfere and change the "history".
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