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Old 01-25-2013, 05:53 PM
Satchmo Satchmo is offline
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What's the Straight Dope on Shingles Vaccination?

My doctor has recently advised me to get a vaccination against Shingles. I'm 55, male, white and don't have any family history, (though I understand it's a viral condition, not hereditary.) I had chicken pox when I was very young. My doctor's concern is the neural damage that it often causes and I usually take my doctor's advice. The downside is that it's rather expensive and not covered by my employer's health insurance, so I'd be five or six hundred dollars out of pocket. I'm unsure if it's worth that to me. I think this has a factual answer. How likely is my contracting this, are there any potential side effects of the vaccine, how likely is the nerve damage if I do get the virus?

MODs, if you decide this needs to go into IMHO, that's fine with me and I apologize for starting in the wrong forum. I have looked on WebMD but don't understand a lot of what I found there.
Thanks!
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:56 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Are you sure about that price? I seem to recall paying about $220 for mine. Believe me, you do NOT want to have shingles. My sister was on heavy duty painkillers for hers and still wanted to just slit her wrists. Yeah, it's that painful. I put it off until about age 60, but you're taking a risk, especially if you're in contact with the public.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:05 PM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
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Fight my ignorance here: Does the shingles vaccination offer protection to those who have had chicken pox? My understanding is that the virus is still in the host, just dormant...maybe the vaccine revs up the immune system so the virus can't go active again?

Kevbo, who had chicken pox along with the rest of his first grade.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:05 PM
KarlGauss KarlGauss is offline
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Here's the CDC site on it, and here's the page there you might want to check out.

Bottom line is that if you are over 60 you should get it. That's it. Doesn't matter if you recall having chicken pox or not (or shingles or not). The vaccine is effective and safe. Shingles is bad news, trust me. The pain can be relentless and excruciating and some of my patients were seriously considering suicide to escape it.

ETA - since people younger than 60 rarely get shingles, you can wait until you're 60. Getting it earlier in life doesn't really serve any purpose and conceivably may make it more likely to wane in effectiveness by the time your risk for shingles becomes significant (i.e. at age 60 or above).

Last edited by KarlGauss; 01-25-2013 at 06:09 PM.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:26 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is online now
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The price at Walgreens is $219.99 per dose. (Price may vary. Consult your pharmacist.) Call around other pharmacies to find out what they charge, too. The charge at doctors' offices and hospitals will usually be higher, especially if you are uninsured.

But, have you checked recently on whether your insurance will cover the vaccination? The Affordable Care Act recently required a lot of preventive services, including many vaccines, to be be covered, although there are some exceptions for grandfathered plans.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:27 PM
CC CC is offline
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I'll go a step further. If you did have chicken pox then you already have the virus. Period. No chance of catching it because it's inside you right now. And at some point in your life, for reasons that are not clearly understood, it can re-activate and cause shingles. Last winter, I happened to mention to my wife that my skin on one side of my chest seemed to be strangely sensitive. She said, "Shingles." Don't know why she knew that. The next morning, I saw my doctor, who pointed out that I was already developing a rash and who put me on steroids and anti-virals right away. By stepping on it in the first 12-24 hours, I avoided what a lot of people say is the worst set of symptoms you can endure. My case got somewhat worse, but nowhere near as bad as the horror stories you will hear. I will now be immune for a few years but when that time is up, I'm taking the shot, and I don't care how much it costs. You should, too. Believe me, if you don't, and you develop this condition, you'll curse your frugal ways. xo,
C.
p.s. Even now, without even having developed a full-blown case, I sometimes have a really unpleasant and uncomfortable bout of sensitive skin on my back, a week or two at a time, which is some residual effect of the condition.

Last edited by CC; 01-25-2013 at 06:32 PM.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:32 PM
Satchmo Satchmo is offline
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Wow. I love this place. Thanks for the quick responses. Especially those Web pages KarlGauss. It sounds like I may be able to wait a couple of years, perhaps my insurance will start covering part of the cost before I'm 60. That's what my Doctor said the vaccine runs for and he knows my insurance provider. I remember I paid over $500 to get a colonoscopy when I was 51 and now they are fully covered for one every 10 years.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:40 PM
Satchmo Satchmo is offline
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Originally Posted by Alley Dweller View Post
The price at Walgreens is $219.99 per dose. (Price may vary. Consult your pharmacist.) Call around other pharmacies to find out what they charge, too. The charge at doctors' offices and hospitals will usually be higher, especially if you are uninsured.

But, have you checked recently on whether your insurance will cover the vaccination? The Affordable Care Act recently required a lot of preventive services, including many vaccines, to be be covered, although there are some exceptions for grandfathered plans.
Yah, I know our insurance is one of the 'grandfathered' ones. Because of that they have some things they have to do that the new ones don't, plus some things they don't have to do that the new ones do. I think I'll go ahead and get the shot when I'm in there in July. Sounds like a definite 'better safe than sorry' situation. I have enough chronic pains as it is.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:43 PM
Red Stilettos Red Stilettos is offline
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What CC said is spot on. You already have the virus. The vaccine boosts your immunity so the virus doesn't become active again. I'll also add that the nerve pain associated with shingles doesn't necessarily go away when the rash resolves. You can be left with severe pain for the rest of your life.

If you decide not to get the vaccine, at least read up on the early symptoms of shingles (hypersensitivity, rash along a dermatome). If you start having those symptoms, go to your doctor straight away. Anti-virals can prevent a full on episode, but they have to be given in the first 24 hrs. So you need to be talking to a doctor before you really start feeling bad.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:48 PM
jasg jasg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley Dweller View Post
The price at Walgreens is $219.99 per dose. (Price may vary. Consult your pharmacist.) Call around other pharmacies to find out what they charge, too. The charge at doctors' offices and hospitals will usually be higher, especially if you are uninsured.

But, have you checked recently on whether your insurance will cover the vaccination? The Affordable Care Act recently required a lot of preventive services, including many vaccines, to be be covered, although there are some exceptions for grandfathered plans.
This was close to the price quoted by my local pharmacy (Fred Meyer) - but as noted, thanks to the ACA my insurance covered it all. (and this is high deductible private insurance with no drug plan, normally I pay everything up to $3500.)

My wife had to pay $58 with her crappy employer insurance.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:04 PM
KarlGauss KarlGauss is offline
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Originally Posted by Red Stilettos View Post
I'll also add that the nerve pain associated with shingles doesn't necessarily go away when the rash resolves. You can be left with severe pain for the rest of your life.
This bears repeating - even after the acute shingles episode has resolved, you are at risk for ongoing and severe pain (called posherpetic neuralgia).

Postherpetic neuralgia link #1

Postherpetic neuralgia link #2 (Wiki)

In my earlier post, I made a statement that is confusing if not wrong. Although shingles is uncommon in people younger than 60, the risk of postherpetic neuralgia is very low in such young people. OTOH, after age 60, shingles results in postherpetic neuralgia in at least 20 to 30 percent of patients. And, it is that, prevention of postherpetic neuraligia, which in my estimation at least, justifies using the vaccine routinely in the over 60 age group.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:04 PM
AndrewL AndrewL is offline
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I've had shingles. If I could have paid $500 to not have had it, I would. It was a week of hell, plus lingering symptoms for at least half a year afterwards.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:33 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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My father said his bout with the shingles hurt worse than the ruptured appendix+peritonitis he had in high school. And the pain went on for weeks.

My spouse had shingles and got to the doctor within the first 24-36 hours for anti-virals and painkillers. Severe pain for weeks.

Mind you, neither of those were severe cases. There are people who have it a LOT worse.

If I could pay $500 to never have to go through the pain those two loved ones did I'd gladly pay it.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:40 PM
CC CC is offline
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QED
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:49 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Anyone know if the shingles vaccine is the "chicken pox vaccine"? As in, is it the same stuff in the bottle, at the same dose? I'm shocked at the price, and wonder if it's being subsidized at that same price per dose for all the kiddos getting the chicken pox vaccine.

I guess, having always had insurance which covered routine childhood vaccinations, and there being so many free or low cost childhood vaccination clinics, I really have no idea what mostvaccines cost out of pocket...
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:55 PM
KarlGauss KarlGauss is offline
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Anyone know if the shingles vaccine is the "chicken pox vaccine"? As in, is it the same stuff in the bottle, at the same dose?
Yes, it is. But, in the shingles vaccine the 'active ingredient' is present in an amount 14 times that of the chickenpox vaccine.

(Does the chicken pox vaccine cost only 1/14 that of the shingles vaccine? )
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:01 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Yes, it is. But, in the shingles vaccine the 'active ingredient' is present in an amount 14 times that of the chickenpox vaccine.

(Does the chicken pox vaccine cost only 1/14 that of the shingles vaccine? )
Huh. Doing a little googling...no. Looks like the chicken pox vaccine runs $80-120 without insurance/low-cost clinic rates. So only about 1/3-1/2 what the shingles vaccine costs. Yikes!

So...I suppose one couldn't ethically dilute a single shingles shot into 14 children's chicken pox shots to save money, huh?
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:05 PM
barath_s barath_s is offline
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Zostavax [the shingles vaccine] " is simply a larger-than-normal dose of Varivax [the smallpox vaccine], and is used to reduce the risk of shingles"[

Or else make sure you take > 3 servings/day of fresh fruit, vegetables and vitamins. A study claiimed that this cuts your risk to 1/3rd

Last edited by barath_s; 01-25-2013 at 08:07 PM.
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:14 PM
barath_s barath_s is offline
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Am I reading that link right? - the UK feels that adults dont need to be vaccinated in general since by hanging around with children who have chickenpox, it boosts their immunity to it. Should Satchmo immediately volunteer at the children's ward in his local hospital? Surely, that cant be wise ?
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:20 PM
Satchmo Satchmo is offline
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Thanks for the facts everyone. I'll call the insurance folks Monday and find out if any of it's covered and get the shot as soon as I can get into the Doc's.
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:26 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is online now
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Huh. Doing a little googling...no. Looks like the chicken pox vaccine runs $80-120 without insurance/low-cost clinic rates. So only about 1/3-1/2 what the shingles vaccine costs. Yikes!

So...I suppose one couldn't ethically dilute a single shingles shot into 14 children's chicken pox shots to save money, huh?
Remember the chicken pox vaccine requires two doses.

Last edited by Alley Dweller; 01-25-2013 at 08:27 PM.
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:39 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is offline
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Not to discourage anyone, but just how likely is getting shingles, really? I mean, since chicken pox is so prevalent that the majority has probably had it sometime, and I'm sure at those prices, there's plenty of seniors not getting vaccinated. So why aren't there massive crowds of seniors getting shingles? No one that I know in that age range has come down with it.

The massive advertising for the vaccine has made me cynical.
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:47 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Originally Posted by Two Many Cats View Post
Not to discourage anyone, but just how likely is getting shingles, really? I mean, since chicken pox is so prevalent that the majority has probably had it sometime, and I'm sure at those prices, there's plenty of seniors not getting vaccinated. So why aren't there massive crowds of seniors getting shingles? No one that I know in that age range has come down with it.

The massive advertising for the vaccine has made me cynical.
According to the CDC:
Quote:
Disease occurrence:

The incidence for herpes zoster is approximately 4 cases per 1,000 U.S. population annually, age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. population
The incidence among people 60 years of age and older is about 10 cases per 1,000 U.S. population annually.
There are an estimated one million cases of herpes zoster in the United States annually.
And to sort of piggyback on what barath_s says about the UK recommendations, there's a theory that children getting the chicken pox in large numbers in the past acted as sort of human shingles vaccines. Grandparents would be re-exposed to the virus at a low level from their grandkids, or kids in the community, and that would retrain their immune system to fight the virus, much like the vaccine now does. Since we now routinely vaccinate children, there's not nearly so many little human vaccines running around, so our elders need the vaccine from the bottle, instead.

So that may be why shingles was pretty rare among our grandmothers, a little more common among our mothers, and will be frighteningly common when we're 60, unless we vaccinate.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:06 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is online now
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Originally Posted by Two Many Cats View Post
Not to discourage anyone, but just how likely is getting shingles, really? I mean, since chicken pox is so prevalent that the majority has probably had it sometime, and I'm sure at those prices, there's plenty of seniors not getting vaccinated. So why aren't there massive crowds of seniors getting shingles? No one that I know in that age range has come down with it.

The massive advertising for the vaccine has made me cynical.
My mother and my aunt both had it before there was a vaccine for either shingles or chicken pox.

Interestingly, my neighbor came down with shingles as soon as he started chemotherapy. I understand that is common. If there had been a chicken pox vaccine before he originally got chicken pox, that would have prevented both the chicken pox and the later shingles.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:28 PM
Pai325 Pai325 is offline
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I had shingles when I was 24 or so, and then had excruciating pain, with no warning, actually bring me to my knees on and off for a year after. Pay whatever you can to avoid this. I was on chemo at the time, so I was at increased risk.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:53 PM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Once you get your shingles shot, do you need to get it again every so many years (or a booster)?

Or is the shingles shot something you only need once and it's good forever?
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:07 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
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Once you get your shingles shot, do you need to get it again every so many years (or a booster)?

Or is the shingles shot something you only need once and it's good forever?
Right now it's once and done. We'll see if that changes as the old farts age. Given how older people tend to form crappy immunity from vaccines, it probably won't.
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:12 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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This bears repeating - even after the acute shingles episode has resolved, you are at risk for ongoing and severe pain (called posherpetic neuralgia).

Postherpetic neuralgia link #1

Postherpetic neuralgia link #2 (Wiki)

In my earlier post, I made a statement that is confusing if not wrong. Although shingles is uncommon in people younger than 60, the risk of postherpetic neuralgia is very low in such young people. OTOH, after age 60, shingles results in postherpetic neuralgia in at least 20 to 30 percent of patients. And, it is that, prevention of postherpetic neuraligia, which in my estimation at least, justifies using the vaccine routinely in the over 60 age group.

My mother, one of the toughest women I know (holocaust survivor) was reduced to a quivering mass of pain from shingles, begging to die. Years later she has chronic pain on her neck and is in tremendous pain nearly every day.

Vaccinate.
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Old 01-26-2013, 12:04 AM
deltasigma deltasigma is offline
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After reading all of the horror stories here, I guess I was pretty lucky. I had shingles but it was localized to the elbow of one arm and there was no rash. It was still rather painful though, I must admit. When the first Dr. wanted to do a muscle biopsy or some such nonsense, I went for second opinion. That guy, my present physician, diagnosed me (I later discovered) even before I opened my yap, just by virtue of the fact that I was wincing in pain and cradling just the elbow of that arm. In hindsight, maybe he was bragging a bit, but I don't really care. He still nailed it, so to speak.

He gave me a course of prendisone, an antiviral and some dope. I thought the Vicodin would be what helped the most with the pain, but oddly enough, it was the prednisone. I started feeling better within 24 hours.

I can't say it was anywhere near the worst pain I've ever experienced, but it certainly wasn't much fun either. There didn't appear to be any sequelae, although I did develop a case of Bell's Palsy not long after that. I suspect both issues were due to weakness resulting from another illness.
  #30  
Old 01-26-2013, 12:23 AM
Hirka T'Bawa Hirka T'Bawa is offline
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The Shingles vaccine is something worth getting, shingles is VERY painful, and depending on where you develop it can have many negative side effects (besides the pain), including blindness (if you develop in the eye).

Shingles is caused by the chicken pox virus, and anyone who has gotten chicken pox (even if they had a very minor case) can devolop Shingles later in life. The chicken pox virus is a herpes virus, and once your body fights it off, the virus takes refuge in your nerve cells where your immune system can't get it. Occasionally, the virus tries to break out of the nerve cell and become active again. In most cases your immune system will see the virus, it will recognize it, and say "STOP! Get back there! Go any farther and I'll KILL YOU!" The awful virus will go back to the nerve cell and go to sleep.... Till next time....

However, occasionally, your immune system won't catch the virus when it leaves the nerve cell, and you come down with Shingles. The virus follows the path of the nerve (hence why it is very painful, and only on one side of the body). This happens mostly when the immune system is compromised. A period of extreme stess, a disease that affects the immune system (Cancer, HIV, etc), or as you get older and your immune system "forgets" what the virus looks like, which normally happens as you get older.

Shingles is a big deal in today's age, and wasn't in my parents time because we came out with the Chicken Pox vaccine in the late 80's. My generation is the last generation that will have to deal with shingles. It used to be that as you got older, you would take care of children who had chicken pox, your children, your grand children, and your great grand children. Being around people with the active virus reminded your immune system what the virus looks like. Today, since we vaccinate all our children, you don't see Chicken Pox in the wild anymore. This is why it is such a big deal now, and wasn't before.

The vaccine is to remind your immune system what chicken pox looks like, so it can keep it in check. It does help, and is worth getting. When it first came out it was recorded for anyone 65 years old or greater. However, during post release studies, they have found the older you are the worse the response (since your immune system gets worse). Recent studies* have shown that having the vaccine younger grants a better immune response allowing for better resistance to developing Shingles. Based on these studies and results the FDA has lowered the approved age of the vaccine to 55 years from the original 65.



* I haven't read the studies myself, in full disclosure I heard about the studies and the change of the FDA during a presentation by the drug company, Merck, at Maggiano's, with yummy free food. Though I believe the pharmacist that they had presenting the presentation.
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Old 01-26-2013, 12:44 AM
Vicullum Vicullum is offline
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Personal anecdote: My mother and her sister are identical twins and have just recently reached retirement age. My aunt got the shingles vaccine and remains free of the disease. My mom didn't, and now she has shingles. Now she wishes she had gotten the shot.
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Old 01-26-2013, 03:21 AM
kbear kbear is offline
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Originally Posted by barath_s View Post
Am I reading that link right? - the UK feels that adults dont need to be vaccinated in general since by hanging around with children who have chickenpox, it boosts their immunity to it. Should Satchmo immediately volunteer at the children's ward in his local hospital? Surely, that cant be wise ?
Odd. My UK doctor is giving the vaccine to his patients over 50.

I don't how rare it might be. Three family members have had it and it ruined the last five years of my grandmother's life. My kids' babysitter had it twice. No thank you.
  #33  
Old 01-26-2013, 09:21 AM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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If you don't get the vaccine and end up getting shingles, even if you just think it might be shingles, get to a doctor. Antiviral meds taken very early can dramatically reduce the duration and intensity of the symptoms. But it has to be early- so get a doctor's evaluation even if you just suspect it is shingles.

Last edited by IvoryTowerDenizen; 01-26-2013 at 09:21 AM.
  #34  
Old 01-26-2013, 10:44 AM
Patty O'Furniture Patty O'Furniture is offline
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Has anyone here had shingles twice or more?

The reason I ask is because I had it when I was in my mid thirties and it was a whole lot of nothing, aside from the visible rash on my back. I have contact dermatitis and thought it was just another allergic reaction to something I had touched. It was not painful at all and only mildly itchy.

Coincidentally, this happened right at the time of a medical checkup. My doctor was doing the thing with the stethoscope when he noticed the rash on my back and said "huh, you've got shingles!"

He didn't give me anything because he said it was very mature (or something like that) and it would resolve itself in spite of whatever medication he might give me. But he did describe it as a textbook case.

So what I'm wondering is: since it was so mild that I hardly noticed it, does that mean it'll be just as wimpy the next time it surfaces?
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  #35  
Old 01-26-2013, 11:44 AM
GythaOgg GythaOgg is offline
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Originally Posted by Alley Dweller View Post
My mother and my aunt both had it before there was a vaccine for either shingles or chicken pox.

Interestingly, my neighbor came down with shingles as soon as he started chemotherapy. I understand that is common. If there had been a chicken pox vaccine before he originally got chicken pox, that would have prevented both the chicken pox and the later shingles.
It's also common for people on immunosuppresive medication for arthritis or psoriasis (methotrexate, Enbrel, Humira, Simponi, etc) to be at higher risk for shingles. There are a lot of folks taking these medications, and my rheumatologist states he sees shingles cases regularly and educates his patients on what to watch for.
  #36  
Old 01-26-2013, 11:57 AM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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Is there any research or info on whether getting a late-in-life booster of chickenpox vaccine would help with the shingles issue?

I am only in my 30s, but I've had three relatives get shingles in their late 40s and early 50s - I really don't think I can wait until I'm 60 to get the shingles shot, and I don't know if I can ask for it as young as I am.

I had chicken pox when I was 13 (caught it from my youngest brother), and it was HORRIBLE. It didn't itch - it HURT like fuck for two weeks. I still have scars.

When my uncle had shingles, he had to be hospitalized and restrained because he would tear at his arms in his sleep. Serious bad shit. DO NOT WANT.
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Old 09-04-2013, 11:21 PM
zemerchai zemerchai is offline
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High (even good) stress plus low immunity and better pricing

Hi... I'm under 60, but I have been under the weather with bronchitis/ sinusitis and busy startup times at work. My back hurt, but I was busy trying to breathe and didn't pay much attention-- until I felt lots of little pustules on my back and an angry red welt from my spinal column horizontally across my back all the way to my waist.

I never would have expected to get shingles, but it happened to me.

My doc said that if it is caught early-- within the first five-six days, there is a prescription that helps lessen the severity.

I am mostly writing to say that I found out today that Costco has the shingles vaccine for 180.00.

Best wishes to all of you,

Zemerchai
  #38  
Old 09-04-2013, 11:31 PM
sisu sisu is offline
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Fight my ignorance here: Does the shingles vaccination offer protection to those who have had chicken pox? My understanding is that the virus is still in the host, just dormant...maybe the vaccine revs up the immune system so the virus can't go active again?

Kevbo, who had chicken pox along with the rest of his first grade.
I had the chicken pox when I was a little kid and then developed shingles at the ripe old age of 36. it was SHITHOUSE!

I wish I had had thee vaccination.

In Australia it's about $50...
  #39  
Old 09-04-2013, 11:50 PM
Kansas Beekeeper Kansas Beekeeper is offline
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I'm 53. I insisted to my doctor that I wanted the vaccination, and he somewhat grudgingly agreed. My insurance would not pay for it because I was not 60. I had to sign a form agreeing to pay when my insurance did not. Oddly, my insurance paid for it.
  #40  
Old 09-05-2013, 05:33 AM
SciFiSam SciFiSam is offline
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Originally Posted by GythaOgg View Post
It's also common for people on immunosuppresive medication for arthritis or psoriasis (methotrexate, Enbrel, Humira, Simponi, etc) to be at higher risk for shingles. There are a lot of folks taking these medications, and my rheumatologist states he sees shingles cases regularly and educates his patients on what to watch for.
I'm currently on hold to my doctor to ask if they'll give me the shingles vaccination for the above reason - methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis. Oddly enough my immune system doesn't seem to have got worse since I've been on it - I didn't get colds when my partner did - but it's not worth the risk.
  #41  
Old 09-05-2013, 05:34 AM
LouisB LouisB is offline
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My father developed shingles while confined to bed in a nursing home. I saw him crying because of the pain----as a younger man, he once drove himself to the hospital with a broken leg----for him to cry, the pain had to be unbelievable. I have had the shingles vaccine but I think it has to be renewed every five years? Is that true? If so, I will be certain to get it again.
  #42  
Old 09-05-2013, 08:23 AM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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My wife and I got it. It is not covered under our medicare, so I had to pay about $200 each. But anyone who has ever known anyone with shingles will not hesitate. I know someone who had it in an eye and you don't even want to ask what that is.

One warning: the vaccine does not offer complete protection. But even if you get shingles after being vaccinated, the effects are much less.
  #43  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:17 PM
SanDiegoTim SanDiegoTim is offline
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My understanding is that Shingles is related to Herpes. Does the Shingles injection have any effect on someone with Herpes. Obviously, not a cure, but does it help keep Herpes in check?
  #44  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:54 PM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is offline
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Originally Posted by SanDiegoTim View Post
My understanding is that Shingles is related to Herpes. Does the Shingles injection have any effect on someone with Herpes. Obviously, not a cure, but does it help keep Herpes in check?
The organisms are related but not identical. The answer is no.
  #45  
Old 09-05-2013, 01:23 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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I have had the shingles vaccine but I think it has to be renewed every five years? Is that true? If so, I will be certain to get it again.
no, it's a one time thing.
  #46  
Old 09-06-2013, 12:29 AM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Originally Posted by Two Many Cats View Post
Not to discourage anyone, but just how likely is getting shingles, really? I mean, since chicken pox is so prevalent that the majority has probably had it sometime, and I'm sure at those prices, there's plenty of seniors not getting vaccinated. So why aren't there massive crowds of seniors getting shingles? No one that I know in that age range has come down with it.

The massive advertising for the vaccine has made me cynical.
I think it's something like one in three . Both of my grandmothers had it, and my dad did last summer. He was given narcotics to deal with the pain, and he was still in agony. And my dad's pretty stubborn when it comes to medical treatment -- he'd have to be bleeding from the eyeballs for us to get him to go to the doctor. So it was pretty bad.

I'd say it's worth it, if you can afford it. Besides, how do you know they haven't had it?
  #47  
Old 09-06-2013, 01:01 AM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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i've known a few people that have had singles. the tv commercials about people feeling the worst pain ever (to them) seems reasonable.

even if the chances of getting it is a few percent the vaccine cuts those chances in half. the vaccine is a one time thing and could be shopped around for to cost $100 or less. it has come down drastically in price and is common enough that pharmacy chains are giving the vaccine.
  #48  
Old 09-06-2013, 05:35 AM
bob++ bob++ is offline
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This prompted me to see what the situation was over here in the UK. I found this, dated last Monday:
Quote:
Shingles jab for people in their 70s

People in their 70s across the UK will be offered a vaccine against shingles from this week.

The government-led programme will initially offer the vaccine to those aged 70 and 79.

Shingles, or herpes zoster, is an infection of a nerve and the area of skin around it, and can cause a painful rash.

Around 800,000 people will be eligible for the vaccine in the first year of the programme.

In England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, those aged 70 and 79 will initially be invited to take up the vaccination.

Over the next few years, the programme will expand to include more of the 70-to-79 age group across the UK until it is fully covered.

After that, the jab should only need to be offered to people as they reach their 70th birthdays.
No doubt, my GP will soon be in touch.

Last edited by bob++; 09-06-2013 at 05:36 AM.
  #49  
Old 09-06-2013, 06:05 AM
SciFiSam SciFiSam is offline
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Originally Posted by bob++ View Post
This prompted me to see what the situation was over here in the UK. I found this, dated last Monday:


No doubt, my GP will soon be in touch.
My GP's confirmed that it's only for people over 70, not for people on immunosuppressant drugs.
  #50  
Old 09-06-2013, 01:19 PM
computergeek computergeek is offline
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Originally Posted by SciFiSam View Post
My GP's confirmed that it's only for people over 70, not for people on immunosuppressant drugs.
In the US, they recommend it for seniors, but younger people can get it too if they have other issues that make them more susceptible. We just need a doctor's note.
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