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  #101  
Old 10-02-2016, 01:53 PM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is offline
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Originally Posted by dennishiding View Post
http://www.durangotrain.com/

Looked like they still had a stoker.

But yeah I don't imagine there's much more than this sort of specialty demand.
They would not of had a stoker, but a fireman. His job would be stoking the fires, and maintaining water levels and boiler pressure. Along with watching the Left (?) side of the track.
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  #102  
Old 10-02-2016, 02:33 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
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Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
Actually, the fuel used on the DQ was Bunker C (AKA #6 fuel oil) which was one step up from tar; it was heated to make to move through the pipes better. I think she was built that way.
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Originally Posted by Snnipe 70E View Post
I was going to question the burning of bunker oil. But I looked at the picture. blacking out like that does look like bunker "c". Oops.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FileeltaQueenRacing.jpg

True bunker "c" needs to be heated to at least 130 degrees to pump it and around 180 degrees to atomize it properly in the burner. And if you spill a little while changing a burner the spilled oil may burn. Or if you spill it in a bilge water will float on top of it.
I'm definitely not competent to say one way or the other. I can't honestly say now whether the crew described it as burning "oil" or "Diesel oil".

But I can say that in normal operations, including initial acceleration from a standstill, it wasn't leaving a heavy black trail like in that pic I linked. That strikes me as them "coal rolling" for the cameras in some way.

A Google image search for ["delta queen" steamboat] returns a lot of pix of it underway leaving the sort of trail you'd expect from a modern diesel-powered boat like a tugboat: slightly sooty but mostly brown exhaust looking. The search will also return lots of pix of other steamboats that aren't the DQ.
  #103  
Old 10-02-2016, 02:55 PM
aldiboronti aldiboronti is offline
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Once a common sight in American cities the guys who patroled the streets cleaning up horse shit are now part of a long-defunct profession. It was estimated in 1908 that New York City alone contained 120,000 horses. Can you imagine how much crap they produced each day? The manure, if not speedily cleaned up, was a potential health hazard, attracting swarms of flies.

I think the cleaners were called White Wings because of their white uniform.
  #104  
Old 10-02-2016, 05:59 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
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Elevator operator is a nearly defunct position, although there still may be some in high-end buildings. In the 1970s my summer job was as an elevator operator of manual elevators (operated by a switch instead of pressing buttons). There probably aren't any of those left any more, at least in public use.
  #105  
Old 10-02-2016, 06:06 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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My defunct profession was a pin setter at a bowling alley after school. I doubt if any lanes still have manual pin-setting anymore. I also used to manally load clay pigeons at a trap-shoot.
  #106  
Old 10-02-2016, 06:45 PM
yabob yabob is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
My defunct profession was a pin setter at a bowling alley after school. I doubt if any lanes still have manual pin-setting anymore. I also used to manally load clay pigeons at a trap-shoot.
I figured there had to be a "vintage" bowling alley someplace that still had them:

http://www.providencejournal.com/art...LIFE/150629425

That's duckpin rather than regular 10 pin, but they still have manual pinsetters.
  #107  
Old 10-02-2016, 10:19 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
VCR repair would be one category that a general electronics repair person would work on. Just because one type went away doesn't mean all types did.

OTOH, modern electronics are virtually disposable upon first failure so repair shops have mostly, but not completely, disappeared. There are still places that scrounge for stuff at thrift shops and garage sales, fix them and sell them to working poor folk.

But a lot of stuff just isn't worth it. A few months ago I checked out for the first time a PC repair business I pass by a lot. The guy had, for example, several tablets for sale. All less powerful and more expensive than a $50 Amazon Fire Tablet. Ditto other stuff: desktops, laptops, etc. I think virus removal and such is they only way he can stay afloat. Didn't seem to be in the phone screen repair business which is in fairly decent demand.
There's an electronics repair store near my home that has a well-worn sign that says "WE FIX: Computers - Televisions - Microwave Ovens". When I went in there as a customer, I said, "Who gets their microwave fixed nowadays?" He replied that those under-the-counter units are not exactly disposable, and they do a lot of work on restaurant microwaves.

They had a couple of TVs for sale in the waiting room, presumably not picked up for whatever reason.
  #108  
Old 10-03-2016, 01:18 AM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is offline
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I'm definitely not competent to say one way or the other. I can't honestly say now whether the crew described it as burning "oil" or "Diesel oil".

But I can say that in normal operations, including initial acceleration from a standstill, it wasn't leaving a heavy black trail like in that pic I linked. That strikes me as them "coal rolling" for the cameras in some way.

A Google image search for ["delta queen" steamboat] returns a lot of pix of it underway leaving the sort of trail you'd expect from a modern diesel-powered boat like a tugboat: slightly sooty but mostly brown exhaust looking. The search will also return lots of pix of other steamboats that aren't the DQ.
blacking out on a boiler is from too little air. Either the fireman was a little slow on increasing the forced draft fans. Or if the boiler is natural draft and the fireman rapidly increases the firing rate too quickly. On steady state steaming it is easier to maintain an economy haze in the stack.
  #109  
Old 10-03-2016, 02:02 AM
gkster gkster is offline
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Do fullers, tuckers and walkers (in the making of woolen cloth) still exist? Or have their jobs been eliminated by automation or by changes in the manufacturing process? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulling
  #110  
Old 10-03-2016, 06:48 AM
campp campp is offline
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I think the cleaners were called White Wings because of their white uniform.
You can see one at the end of the animated intro to "Peabody's Improbable History".
  #111  
Old 10-03-2016, 07:50 AM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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Originally Posted by Musicat View Post
The IBM proof machines I worked with had absolutely no capability to print anything on any check. You're probably referring to a later development and a much different machine.

I think you underestimate the power of optical scanners today. Even the Post Office uses them to read handwritten addresses. Not perfect, but they can read almost anything. Humans only get the worst ones to interpret.
OK, you're old! You must be referring to proof machines used in the early 80's and prior. Since that time the machines, in addition to sorting the checks, also print the amount keyed by the operator on to the MICR line of the check.

OCR technology is not there yet, not to the level needed by the financial industry, as evidenced by the continued existence of proof operator jobs in all banks.

Last edited by Doctor Jackson; 10-03-2016 at 07:51 AM.
  #112  
Old 10-03-2016, 09:23 AM
Tootingkhamen Tootingkhamen is offline
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Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
WAG: someone who prepares rags for paper-making.
I think this must be it. This pub is close to the River Wandle which used to have something like 90 mills of various types along its length, including paper mills.

If you search for "Rag Beating" then the term comes up as part of the paper-making process; I guess the pub lodger preferred the sound of "smash"
  #113  
Old 10-03-2016, 09:39 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
On a related note, it's getting hard to find openings for superintendents of tuberculosis sanitariums and leper colonies.
I can name two or three hospitals in my home town that began as sanitaria and have been in continuous operation since.
  #114  
Old 10-03-2016, 09:53 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Lots of barrels are also made for the winemaking industry as well. Granted, barrels were much more in demand say... 100-150 years ago, but being a cooper is still a going profession, unlike some of the others that date from those days.
True. Barrels used to be the default shipping container for bulk goods - as evidenced by the name of that chain restaurant with the folksy, general store ambience.

There were even sub-categories of cooper - dry coopers, who made barrels that would contain nails and stuff, and the more exacting wet coopers, who made barrels that would contain liquid. Probably not many dry coopers around these days - corrugated cardboard is SO much cheaper.
  #115  
Old 10-03-2016, 10:02 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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@malthus: We had a similar thread not long ago about the idea of ancient process knowledge that's supposedly been lost. We eventually got around to the conclusion that damn near nothing that humanity has ever learned how to do has been truly forgotten. For the reasons you enumerate.

Somebody somewhere today knows how to knap a flint, tie it to a stick with grass & bark, and has killed a large herbivore using just such a self-made tool. And cooked and eaten part of the critter after starting a fire using makeshift found objects.
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  #116  
Old 10-03-2016, 10:09 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Plague doctors. I'm pretty sure there are no more plague doctors.
Tell that to the folks in the rural Southwest. Yersinia pestis is alive and well and living in your local prairie dog colony
  #117  
Old 10-03-2016, 10:17 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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Originally Posted by burpo the wonder mutt View Post
Milkman? Iceman?
Milk delivered by a milkman is available where I live. Iceman, you may have a point.
  #118  
Old 10-03-2016, 11:22 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Originally Posted by yabob View Post
I figured there had to be a "vintage" bowling alley someplace that still had them:

http://www.providencejournal.com/art...LIFE/150629425

That's duckpin rather than regular 10 pin, but they still have manual pinsetters.
If you count quasi-museums, which continue to have working industrial diaplays, no profession will ever cease to exist. I recently saw a video of a guy who demonstrates a Mergenthaler linotype machine at a museum. I once worked for a newspaper that used one, and the most amazing hours of my life were sitting there watching the operator run the machine.

Last edited by jtur88; 10-03-2016 at 11:24 AM.
  #119  
Old 10-03-2016, 06:49 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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Milk delivered by a milkman is available where I live. Iceman, you may have a point.
We get milk delivered every week to our door. It's local, fresh, relatively cheap and convenient.

One relativey recent profession become defunct:

Game Play Counselor

If you were stuck on a game you'd call a hotline and an "expert" would give you tips to get you past where you were stuck. You'd pay a fee for the service. These days 5 seconds on Google will give you the same result.

Nintendo finally retired the service for good in 2005. I doubt anyone is trying to offer that service anymore anywhere. I can't find anything at least.
  #120  
Old 10-03-2016, 08:37 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Plague doctors. I'm pretty sure there are no more plague doctors.
Infectious disease continues to be a very active specialty, albeit one of the lowest paid.
  #121  
Old 10-03-2016, 09:07 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Elevator operator is a nearly defunct position, although there still may be some in high-end buildings. In the 1970s my summer job was as an elevator operator of manual elevators (operated by a switch instead of pressing buttons). There probably aren't any of those left any more, at least in public use.
Every week I stop in to singly or in succession shop read or pee at the Argosy Book Store on 59th St. (Photo: http://static1.squarespace.com/stati...408/books9.jpg) and get to switch that switch if I ask nice on the elevator ride.
  #122  
Old 10-03-2016, 09:12 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
If you count quasi-museums, which continue to have working industrial diaplays, no profession will ever cease to exist. I recently saw a video of a guy who demonstrates a Mergenthaler linotype machine at a museum. I once worked for a newspaper that used one, and the most amazing hours of my life were sitting there watching the operator run the machine.
Ex hot-type typesetter here. I did the hand forms (a la Gutenberg up to Linotype) still done, and fooled around on the Linotype when the boss let me.

Fun fact: The New York Times used to preferentially hire hard-of-hearing Linotypists. Unbelievable racket down there. Mrs. Bloom was a copy girl back in the day, and told me about the yelling and hand-signaling.
  #123  
Old 10-03-2016, 10:58 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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There were elevator operators on Capitol Hill when I was there on an internship in 1987. Don't know if they're still on the job today.

No more scriveners these days, I think. Bartleby will have to retrained.
  #124  
Old 10-04-2016, 09:10 AM
GaryM GaryM is offline
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My defunct profession was a pin setter at a bowling alley after school. I doubt if any lanes still have manual pin-setting anymore. I also used to manally load clay pigeons at a trap-shoot.
One of the Sporting Clay courses I frequent has a "trapper" that travels with the group. He hand loads the birds for each stand and throws them on command. He's paid as part of the fee, but each shooter usually kinks in another $5.
  #125  
Old 10-04-2016, 09:47 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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$5 is a cheap kink.
  #126  
Old 10-04-2016, 10:02 AM
XT XT is offline
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Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
I think to be truly "defunct" a profession must meet some criteria. It is actually surprisingly difficult to think up a profession no-one still does, somewhere.

1. It has to be something no longer useful, because the good or service is either no longer used, or done cheaper and better some other way.

2. That isn't enough, because there are whole categories of goods which are no longer used, but are collector's items or have some specialist interest. No one "needs" a medieval broadsword, but forging them is nonetheless an existing occupation.

3. Also, even if the good or service can be performed some cheaper way, there are whole categories of activities people do anyway, because it is fun, or because handmade has qualities superior to machine-made (so, lots of potters still exist, both as hobbyists and because there is still a market for hand-made pottery, even though machines can stamp out pots very cheaply).

4. Also, there cannot be a lot of interest in knowing how it was done. There are still people who specialize in such archaic skills as flint-knapping, just to learn more about ancient flint-knappers.

5. Thus, a good candidate for truly "defunct" professions are industrial occupations, in which laborious, dirty and/or dangerous activities have long been replaced with improvements to machinery - assuming the occupations don't still exist somewhere like North Korea.
Well, if you are going to include North Korea, then my WAG is all bets are off...they are frozen in time and so secretive that they could have any old, defunct (everywhere else) equipment or manual labor practices still going on.

I think anywhere BUT North Korea that switchboard operators are out pretty much defunct, though. There is no use having someone sit and manually connect physical network connections via a plug when electronic switching equipment can do it better and orders of magnitude faster. Doing a Google search, the only people listed as 'switchboard operators' these days are usually people acting as receptionists in one way or another...either for email or for voice calls coming into a central reception desk. But that's not what an actual switchboard operator used to be, so I think this is a good candidate even using your criteria.

Sadly, I think buggy whip makers are still a thing, if only a niche thing. You can still get buggy whips and riding crops after all.

Last edited by XT; 10-04-2016 at 10:03 AM.
  #127  
Old 10-04-2016, 03:07 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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Well, if you are going to include North Korea, then my WAG is all bets are off...they are frozen in time and so secretive that they could have any old, defunct (everywhere else) equipment or manual labor practices still going on.
That's just the problem: given that this planet still has all sorts of folks in various states of development (or impoverishment), it is really hard to think of any occupation that is well and truly "gone". Reduced in numbers, existing only as odd niches, or only existing in really economically backwards places - sure, plenty of those. But totally "gone" is tough.

Quote:
I think anywhere BUT North Korea that switchboard operators are out pretty much defunct, though. There is no use having someone sit and manually connect physical network connections via a plug when electronic switching equipment can do it better and orders of magnitude faster. Doing a Google search, the only people listed as 'switchboard operators' these days are usually people acting as receptionists in one way or another...either for email or for voice calls coming into a central reception desk. But that's not what an actual switchboard operator used to be, so I think this is a good candidate even using your criteria.

Sadly, I think buggy whip makers are still a thing, if only a niche thing. You can still get buggy whips and riding crops after all.
That's a possible one.

I thought of another - the original "calculator'. A 'calculator' used to be a job title, for someone who spent all day toting up figures by hand, or using a mechanical aid like an abacus. Electronic calculators are now so cheap and ubiquitous that they may have completely eliminated this as a profession, even in the most backwards places.
  #128  
Old 10-04-2016, 04:37 PM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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No more scriveners these days, I think. Bartleby will have to retrained.
Scrivener -- lovely word IMO. An uncle of mine, who was a schoolteacher, wrote -- long ago -- for his schoolkids to perform, a play about Robin Hood and his doings -- including of course, the highly-evil Sheriff of Nottingham. He included a part, for the Sheriff's Scrivener; a rather timid clerkly character who accompanies the Sheriff and his band wherever they go, in order to write down a highly-edited version of law-enforcement's proceedings. The Sheriff, being a total villain, bullies the Scrivener mercilessly, as he does all his underlings. At one point, the Scrivener messes up what he ought to be writing: Sheriff grabs the document from him, looks it over, and bellows: "Where the heck did you learn to scriven? This is terrible spelling, even for the Middle Ages !" Lame humour, maybe; but it has always cracked me up.
  #129  
Old 10-04-2016, 07:12 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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I use to hand paint maps. Oil on linen. One map could take weeks. They cost thousands of dollars.

Now I can spit out maps like that in minutes. But I still have a job as a GIS programmer/analyst.

No one hand sets type anymore, I suspect it's sort of similar. But once type was set, thousands could be printed. Not so with these hand painted maps. Sadly, I don't own one myself.
  #130  
Old 10-05-2016, 05:49 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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True. Barrels used to be the default shipping container for bulk goods - as evidenced by the name of that chain restaurant with the folksy, general store ambience.
They still are, kind of. It's only that now the containers of the same shape are made of plastic and called drums.
  #131  
Old 10-05-2016, 08:09 AM
Isilder Isilder is offline
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I thought of another - the original "calculator'. A 'calculator' used to be a job title, for someone who spent all day toting up figures by hand, or using a mechanical aid like an abacus. Electronic calculators are now so cheap and ubiquitous that they may have completely eliminated this as a profession, even in the most backwards places.

However it could be argued that the racetracks bookie is really better than buying electronic tickets because the bet taker calculates the odds and returns in his head...
  #132  
Old 10-05-2016, 08:21 AM
Isilder Isilder is offline
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I'm definitely not competent to say one way or the other. I can't honestly say now whether the crew described it as burning "oil" or "Diesel oil".

But I can say that in normal operations, including initial acceleration from a standstill, it wasn't leaving a heavy black trail like in that pic I linked. That strikes me as them "coal rolling" for the cameras in some way..
Maybe coal rolling, or maybe it was the fuel in use.

A book on her says that they used diesel if that was all that was available.

https://books.google.com.au/books?id...20fuel&f=false

Diesel ICE burn it at a high pressure.. So we need to look else where for evidence of what happens when diesel is burnt at atmospheric pressure..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzi8Ull24KQ
Black smoke results.

Last edited by Isilder; 10-05-2016 at 08:23 AM.
  #133  
Old 10-05-2016, 12:18 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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Presumably not completely defunct but rare enough so that the name itself causes awe and wonder: Saggar Maker's Bottom Knocker.
  #134  
Old 10-06-2016, 06:44 PM
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Ex hot-type typesetter here...
Ex-hot-type typesetter here.

I mean, I've always done it optically/digitally, but I'm no longer the hot type.
  #135  
Old 10-07-2016, 04:19 AM
john b. john b. is offline
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I'm not sure about the rest of the world but in America I don't think there are any hangmen these days.

While we still execute people in some states it's mostly lethal injections. I don't there are too many people left whose occupations are pulling the switch to electrocute a convicted murderer, though there are doubtless retired ones.
  #136  
Old 10-07-2016, 06:54 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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I'm not sure about the rest of the world but in America I don't think there are any hangmen these days.

While we still execute people in some states it's mostly lethal injections. I don't there are too many people left whose occupations are pulling the switch to electrocute a convicted murderer, though there are doubtless retired ones.
Hanging is a legal method in Washington and New Hampshire. In WA, the inmate may choose that form. In NH, it's listed as a legal backup method if others are not available. The last hanging took place in 1996. If I was on WA's death row, I'd pick hanging over the others.

Electrocution is legal in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Oklahoma. The latter is backup method only while the others allow inmate choice. The last electrocution was in 2013. One should never choose this method unless ones goal is create permanent nightmares in the witnesses.)

(Last firing squad: 2010; last gassing: 1999.)
  #137  
Old 10-07-2016, 12:08 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Being a child of the suburbs, I've only heard of one Eggman in the last 50 years. Sadly, gone since 1980 (Goo goo goo joob).

All right, I'm going.
  #138  
Old 10-07-2016, 01:04 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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Being a child of the suburbs, I've only heard of one Eggman in the last 50 years. Sadly, gone since 1980 (Goo goo goo joob).
The Eggman lives, in Orlando. Under a chicken, of course. At least if he wasn't blown away today. I hear the storm is due to pass by around 8 O'Cluck.
  #139  
Old 10-07-2016, 02:51 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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Being a child of the suburbs, I've only heard of one Eggman in the last 50 years. Sadly, gone since 1980 (Goo goo goo joob).

All right, I'm going.
When I was a kid, in the early '70s, our family had a "chicken man".

One of my earliest memories was of hearing about this mysterious figure, who would arrive every Tuesday at 10:00 AM. I was never in at that time, because I was always in daycare or kindergarten.

One day, I was home with a cold, and it was Tuesday! The "chicken man" was coming! I was very excited!

Imagine my dismay when the "chicken man" turned out to be wrinkled old fellow in overalls with a cooler. According to my mother, when I set eyes on him I looked very sad, and said: "where are all his feathers?!".
  #140  
Old 10-07-2016, 06:18 PM
StarvingButStrong StarvingButStrong is offline
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Hanging is a legal method in Washington and New Hampshire. In WA, the inmate may choose that form. In NH, it's listed as a legal backup method if others are not available. The last hanging took place in 1996. If I was on WA's death row, I'd pick hanging over the others.

(Last firing squad: 2010; last gassing: 1999.)

No "drown in a vat of wine" option? Sad.
  #141  
Old 10-07-2016, 08:28 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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The Eggman lives, in Orlando. Under a chicken, of course. At least if he wasn't blown away today. I hear the storm is due to pass by around 8 O'Cluck.
8 O'Cluck? Were we separated at birth? (Eggman's a hoot.)

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Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
When I was a kid, in the early '70s, our family had a "chicken man".

One of my earliest memories was of hearing about this mysterious figure, who would arrive every Tuesday at 10:00 AM. I was never in at that time, because I was always in daycare or kindergarten.

One day, I was home with a cold, and it was Tuesday! The "chicken man" was coming! I was very excited!

Imagine my dismay when the "chicken man" turned out to be wrinkled old fellow in overalls with a cooler. According to my mother, when I set eyes on him I looked very sad, and said: "where are all his feathers?!".
Good story.
  #142  
Old 10-07-2016, 08:38 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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I'm sure there must be a few still around, but his days are probably numbered:

Once a month, when I was a kid, there would be a knock on the door and this sonorous voice would bellow, GAS MAN! I think he read the gas and electric meters.
  #143  
Old 10-07-2016, 10:14 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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I have a couple ideas:

Punch card manufacturer. Even if you lump "keypunch operator" into "data entry" and declare the profession is not dead, I seriously doubt anyone is still making physical punch cards anymore. That isn't something a hobbyist could reasonably do, and the demand in industry has probably decayed to nil.

Paper tape manufacturer. Yes, data was once stored on perforated paper tape. No, you can't make it in your basement.

In fact, I could probably go through and list a lot of different memory and storage technologies which nobody uses anymore, meaning their manufacture would be a lost art. High on the list would be mercury delay lines: Glass tubes filled with mercury, which worked by having pulsed vibrations bounce around inside them until they were read back out. They'd be extremely difficult to build, and you'd only be able to use them if you're going whole-hog in re-implementing some room-filling monstrosity from the early vacuum tube era; anything more modern would have a memory technology that's much easier to work with and has a much higher capacity. There's no modern call for those monstrosities, and they're too difficult of a project for the basement tinkerer to even consider.
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If you don't stop to analyze the snot spray, you are missing that which is best in life. - Miller
I'm not sure why this is, but I actually find this idea grosser than cannibalism. - Excalibre, after reading one of my surefire million-seller business plans.
  #144  
Old 10-07-2016, 10:22 PM
john b. john b. is offline
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Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg View Post
Hanging is a legal method in Washington and New Hampshire. In WA, the inmate may choose that form. In NH, it's listed as a legal backup method if others are not available. The last hanging took place in 1996. If I was on WA's death row, I'd pick hanging over the others.

Electrocution is legal in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Oklahoma. The latter is backup method only while the others allow inmate choice. The last electrocution was in 2013. One should never choose this method unless ones goal is create permanent nightmares in the witnesses.)

(Last firing squad: 2010; last gassing: 1999.)

Thanks, and I'm the next state down from New Hampshire and didn't even know that. Not that I'm surprised...
  #145  
Old 10-07-2016, 10:27 PM
john b. john b. is offline
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Delivery Guys

Quote:
Originally Posted by burpo the wonder mutt View Post
Being a child of the suburbs, I've only heard of one Eggman in the last 50 years. Sadly, gone since 1980 (Goo goo goo joob).

All right, I'm going.
There used to be what I believe were called butter and egg men, who sold these and dairy products generally door to door. I mean they drove a truck of some kind, could be summoned to neighborhoods (not sure if summoned is the right word).

Locally, where I grew up there were bakeries,--and one that was famous and is still well remembered--who could be called and would send their trucks to certain streets. Ours was one of the lucky ones. They sold bread, baked goods, sweets. They were high end and top quality.
  #146  
Old 10-08-2016, 12:37 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john b. View Post
There used to be what I believe were called butter and egg men, who sold these and dairy products generally door to door. I mean they drove a truck of some kind, could be summoned to neighborhoods (not sure if summoned is the right word).

Locally, where I grew up there were bakeries,--and one that was famous and is still well remembered--who could be called and would send their trucks to certain streets. Ours was one of the lucky ones. They sold bread, baked goods, sweets. They were high end and top quality.
The second I read "butter and egg men," my brain said, British term, john b. is from across the pond, but five seconds later, I changed my mind, as this thread has amply demonstrated that there is still delivery of dairy goods and several terms for the delivery-people. I honestly don't remember if our local milkman brought extra stuff in addition to moo-juice; in our area, that ceased in the late '60s when I was still a pre-teen.

The bakery truck sounds like a nifty thing; we didn't have that where I lived.
  #147  
Old 10-10-2016, 08:03 AM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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The dairy that delivers milk to us each week also delivers eggs (we get them sometimes) and bread. Not sure about butter but it wouldn't surprise me.

I just checked their web site and they seem to deliver everything:

https://smithbrothersfarms.com/sbf.o...nt/manageorder
  #148  
Old 10-10-2016, 11:13 AM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
The dairy that delivers milk to us each week also delivers eggs (we get them sometimes) and bread. Not sure about butter but it wouldn't surprise me.

I just checked their web site and they seem to deliver everything:

https://smithbrothersfarms.com/sbf.o...nt/manageorder
YOU MONSTER! Have you no mercy? The first thing that appears when you click the link is "Cougar Mountain Pumpkin Cookie Dough." Holy schlaMOLY! I can feel my waistline expanding just thinking about it.
  #149  
Old 10-10-2016, 12:42 PM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
My defunct profession was a pin setter at a bowling alley after school. I doubt if any lanes still have manual pin-setting anymore. I also used to manally load clay pigeons at a trap-shoot.
There is a bowling Hall of Fame in St. Louis that still has one.
  #150  
Old 10-10-2016, 12:53 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
There are still a few of these around, for niche/artisanal markets or at historic sites, but as professions they're largely obsolete:

blacksmith
groom (cared for horses)
cooper (barrelmaker)
teamster (in the original sense - one who drove teams of horses)
muleskinner (ditto, but for mules)
The word here is obsolescent, not obsolete. There are over 9 million horses still in the USA. There are between 5,000 and 10,000 blacksmiths in the U.S..
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