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  #51  
Old 10-18-2016, 07:21 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
Possibly, for no known practical reason it is a double ended door handle.
How would this be installed in a door? The hole in the door would have to be as big as the knob to get it through, then the hole is too big to affix the middle piece to the door. That won't work.
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  #52  
Old 10-18-2016, 07:23 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Could it have been part of a display of curtain rail finial options?

I've often seen these displayed together in mirrored pairs - I think it probably helps people visualise what they will look like on the ends of the rails.

Obviously these are not complete finials, but this could have been a component of a display of options - something like (but not exactly the same as) this: https://goo.gl/images/k84RW9

Last edited by Mangetout; 10-18-2016 at 07:25 AM.
  #53  
Old 10-18-2016, 07:57 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
How would this be installed in a door? The hole in the door would have to be as big as the knob to get it through, then the hole is too big to affix the middle piece to the door. That won't work.
The middle piece is larger than the ends. If you were doing this for some reason, and I can't think of a good one, you'd be fitting the square piece into a cutout in the door of the same size. I can't imagine any good reason to do that. But having seen the way a lot of old houses were constructed nothing much surprises me anymore.
  #54  
Old 10-18-2016, 08:27 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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I betting it is the bearing of a spinning wheel. The pointed ends fit into sockets of the arms holding the wheel, and the square middle fits into the hub of the wheel that attaches to the spokes. If not a spinning wheel, then some other light duty device that requires a bearing to turn.

Last edited by Fear Itself; 10-18-2016 at 08:29 AM.
  #55  
Old 10-18-2016, 04:42 PM
gkster gkster is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehearingaid View Post
Maybe it for knitting woolen socks ???
I've knitted and crocheted woolen socks and this isn't something that I could see being used in the process.
  #56  
Old 10-18-2016, 06:04 PM
Oddball_92 Oddball_92 is offline
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Are you sure it does not come apart? It might be an antique sewing kit that is hollow in the middle with a friction fit. Look up antique acorn sewing kit.
  #57  
Old 10-18-2016, 06:22 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
I betting it is the bearing of a spinning wheel. The pointed ends fit into sockets of the arms holding the wheel, and the square middle fits into the hub of the wheel that attaches to the spokes. If not a spinning wheel, then some other light duty device that requires a bearing to turn.
I suppose that is possible, but there's no need for the large acorn shapes and the little nubs on the end don't look like very good axles for something that has a hub that large.
  #58  
Old 10-18-2016, 06:26 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
I suppose that is possible, but there's no need for the large acorn shapes and the little nubs on the end don't look like very good axles for something that has a hub that large.
If you want a lightweight wheel to spin freely, the bearing needs to be a small as possible to reduce friction. The acorn shapes are just decorative, as were many spinning wheels back in the day.
  #59  
Old 10-18-2016, 06:32 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
If you want a lightweight wheel to spin freely, the bearing needs to be a small as possible to reduce friction. The acorn shapes are just decorative, as were many spinning wheels back in the day.
But what you describe is not a lightweight wheel. That axle alone is very heavy, as would be the hub that holds it. That indicates to me the wheel it holds is none too light either. But it's possible.

ETA: You may be getting close though. Possibly that's some kind of double bobbin for a weaving machine, although I don't see the point of the square piece in the middle.

Last edited by TriPolar; 10-18-2016 at 06:35 PM.
  #60  
Old 10-18-2016, 06:41 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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One thing I noticed that seems rather odd is that the stems connecting the acorns to the central block have also been squared off. I wonder if the stems can be unscrewed from the center block with a wrench, to reveal some interior structure.
  #61  
Old 10-18-2016, 11:12 PM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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I swear to you, this is one solid piece, cut from a single block of wood. It does not come apart.
  #62  
Old 10-21-2016, 09:07 AM
Scantzen Scantzen is offline
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Since it might have been found on a desk, the first thing it suggested to me was a paperweight for two stacks of paper, side by side, like an In/Out tray. The middle piece would keep it from rolling. Unfortunately, I can't find any reference to such a thing or even idea. It's what I would use it for!
  #63  
Old 10-21-2016, 10:19 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Originally Posted by Spoke View Post
I swear to you, this is one solid piece, cut from a single block of wood. It does not come apart.
Yeah, but does it?
  #64  
Old 10-21-2016, 12:47 PM
quimper quimper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoke View Post
I swear to you, this is one solid piece, cut from a single block of wood. It does not come apart.
Not with that attitude it won't!
  #65  
Old 10-22-2016, 07:58 AM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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I think the selective application of the finish is not for any functional reason, but simply because the unfinished parts are harder to get a brush into.
  #66  
Old 10-22-2016, 01:47 PM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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I suspect the finish was applied after the piece had been assembled into a larger unit. That is why I want to see the edge of the square part. That should provide some clues.

Last edited by Francis Vaughan; 10-22-2016 at 01:47 PM.
  #67  
Old 10-22-2016, 04:30 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
I betting it is the bearing of a spinning wheel. The pointed ends fit into sockets of the arms holding the wheel, and the square middle fits into the hub of the wheel that attaches to the spokes. If not a spinning wheel, then some other light duty device that requires a bearing to turn.
As I pointed out earlier, it looks more like the vertical piece that the spun yarn goes around, at the business end of the wheel. Since it has no wear marks, maybe it was a spare that never got used. Maybe it's reversible (drop it into the square peg hole) to extend its life.
  #68  
Old 10-28-2016, 07:54 AM
Ksnook Ksnook is offline
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It's a darning tool for gloves and mittens. Rather like this http://www.homethingspast.com/wp-con...9086816501.jpg
  #69  
Old 10-28-2016, 08:49 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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I don't think the object in the OP would be used for darning. The example you link to is narrow enough along its length that you can slip it into a sock without stretching out the sock, and offers a smooth surface on which to sew. But the object in the OP seems too broad to fit comfortably into a sock and has a pointed end that's going to make it difficult to sew on top of.
  #70  
Old 10-30-2016, 05:19 AM
Debs181 Debs181 is offline
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If the acorn caps unscrew, it's possible this might be a wooden style of nutmeg grater:
http://www.nutmeggraters.com/ivoryOr...egGrater.html#

It might also be a double-sided pediment:
http://www.architecturaldepot.com/pediments.html
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