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  #51  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:01 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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And yeah, Welsh Rabbit is never seen any more. My theory is that the raging American passion for melted cheese was re-directed toward pizza after WWII.

Pizza is available everywhere, so why melt cheddar cheese into beer and mustard and pour it over toast and eat it with a fork and knife? Aside from the fact that it's delicious?
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  #52  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:02 PM
stillownedbysetters stillownedbysetters is offline
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I remember a dish called tuna/chicken/turkey chopstick that was identical to the tuna casserole with the potato chip toppng, except that it was topped with chow mein noodles (hence the politically-incorrect 'chopstick' moniker).

I haven't seen that one around for a long time.

Last edited by stillownedbysetters; 12-23-2016 at 08:03 PM.
  #53  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:04 PM
Aspenglow Aspenglow is offline
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Originally Posted by bobot View Post
I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
I just made one last night. Used Saltines and shredded Parmesan cheese instead of potato chips, though.

I'm another who regularly roasts whole chickens, makes an occasional quiche, has made Beef Wellington for special dinners and have done quite a few other things listed. Not as often as I used to, though.
  #54  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:07 PM
JohnGalt JohnGalt is offline
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Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
You have to watch out if you have a Watergate salad, it might have a bug in it.
I made a Watergate salad, ironically of course, for last year's Christmas potluck at work. Nobody touched it; this high-falutin group raves over couscous and such instead. But I liked it!

Are we counting breakfast items? Oatmeal has had a resurgence, but it seems like Cream of Wheat (farina) and its cousin Cocoa Wheat aren't advertised much anymore, and no one admits to eating the stuff.
  #55  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:22 PM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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Many years ago the Saint John library had a sale where I bought a bunch of old Life magazines from the 1930s through the 1980s for a dollar or two each. It was nearly a full set so you could cherry pick important historical events. The ads, similar to Lileks were full of meat and vegetable dishes on Jello, space age canned food and TV dinners, and odd looking meat shapes made out of seven brand name canned products.

This is different from unfashionable dishes: Shake n Bake chicken, Salisbury steak, Moxie, pate, crunchy yellow chow mein noodles, chicory coffee, Carob, devilled eggs, vodka with sour Jolly Ranchers, Schneiders Red Hot meat things, chicken tetrazzini, etc.
  #56  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:24 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post
I made a Watergate salad, ironically of course, for last year's Christmas potluck at work. Nobody touched it; this high-falutin group raves over couscous and such instead. But I liked it!

Are we counting breakfast items? Oatmeal has had a resurgence, but it seems like Cream of Wheat (farina) and its cousin Cocoa Wheat aren't advertised much anymore, and no one admits to eating the stuff.
I had to look that up. I never even heard of Coco Wheat! It looks like it's still around.
  #57  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:33 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
...
Jane & Michael Stern's excellent SQUARE MEALS has a great tuna-noodle casserole recipe in the "Cuisine of Suburbia" section, called, I think, "He Man's Tuna Casserole." I've made it for young Banjo many times, and he still asks for it at the age of 21. But it's just as much work as a Chicken or Turkey or Duck Tetrazzini, which is much more delicious.
This is one of my favorite cookbooks ever. Not so much to cook from, but to read. It is hilarious, and the "Cuisine of Suburbia" is one of the best chapters. They describe an appetizer for your pseudo-Hawaiian luau, where you cut an opening in the top of a cabbage into which you insert a lighted sterno can. Then you impale cocktail franks all over the cabbage on toothpicks and have dishes of dipping sauce. The name of this masterpiece: "Flaming Cabbage-Head Weenies with Pu-Pu Sauce."

If you're the kind of person who likes to read cookbooks, don't miss this one.

Last edited by ThelmaLou; 12-23-2016 at 08:34 PM.
  #58  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:37 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr_Paprika View Post
This is different from unfashionable dishes: Shake n Bake chicken, Salisbury steak, Moxie, pate, crunchy yellow chow mein noodles, chicory coffee, Carob, devilled eggs, vodka with sour Jolly Ranchers, Schneiders Red Hot meat things, chicken tetrazzini, etc.
Deviled eggs and chicken Tetrazzini OUT OF STYLE? Bite your tongue, sir!

You know what was weird? My Mom used to make something called "city chicken" in the '60s in Cleveland -- it was veal skewered on little wood skewers, and it tasted like crap.

At the time, veal was cheaper than actual chicken? Hard to believe these days, when veal scallopini is fetching $22 a pound at Whole Foods.
  #59  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:39 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Deviled eggs and chicken Tetrazzini OUT OF STYLE? Bite your tongue, sir!

You know what was weird? My Mom used to make something called "city chicken" in the '60s in Cleveland -- it was veal skewered on little wood skewers, and it tasted like crap.

At the time, veal was cheaper than actual chicken? Hard to believe these days, when veal scallopini is fetching $22 a pound at Whole Foods.
Ah,yes! I have a bunch of cookbooks that have "city chicken" in them. That was a little before my time, but, yeah, it's bizarre to think there was a time when a cheaper version of "chicken" was imitated with veal.
  #60  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:47 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Ah,yes! I have a bunch of cookbooks that have "city chicken" in them. That was a little before my time, but, yeah, it's bizarre to think there was a time when a cheaper version of "chicken" was imitated with veal.
I just looked it up on Wiki. It's still pretty popular in the Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Toledo area of the Great Lakes (looks like Chicago is safe!), but they make it with pork now.

I remember it as being unpleasantly DRY. Maybe Mom was too lazy to make gravy.
  #61  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:49 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I just looked it up on Wiki. It's still pretty popular in the Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Toledo area of the Great Lakes (looks like Chicago is safe!), but they make it with pork now.

I remember it as being unpleasantly DRY. Maybe Mom was too lazy to make gravy.
My guess is going to be more that they overcooked everything to holy hell back then.... (and, really, even today in home kitchens for the most part, since most people like to play it overly safe.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-23-2016 at 08:50 PM.
  #62  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:54 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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This is one of my favorite cookbooks ever. Not so much to cook from, but to read. It is hilarious....If you're the kind of person who likes to read cookbooks, don't miss this one.
Oh yeah. Great for a good read, not so much for cooking out of. Although a lady friend once baked me a "Milky Way Cake" (yes, made out of candy bars).

When young Banjo was in his early teens, I believe he went through the "Soda Fountain Treats" section and tried every sundae. Making the "Golden Marshmallow Sauce" was a real pain in the ass.
  #63  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:57 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
My guess is going to be more that they overcooked everything to holy hell back then.... (and, really, even today in home kitchens for the most part, since most people like to play it overly safe.)
Yes. The Wiki article says that most P/C/T home cooks just put it in the oven. And bake until thoroughly desiccated.

My Mom was SUCH a crappy cook...
  #64  
Old 12-23-2016, 09:25 PM
Drunky Smurf Drunky Smurf is offline
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I don't hear much about people eating long-pig since the Donner party.
  #65  
Old 12-23-2016, 10:23 PM
Arizona Mike Arizona Mike is offline
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Braunschweiger
Deviled Ham

Have to admit that I made tuna casserole for my kids night before last. They liked it.
  #66  
Old 12-23-2016, 10:59 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Arizona Mike View Post
Braunschweiger
Deviled Ham

Have to admit that I made tuna casserole for my kids night before last. They liked it.
I actually had to look up what deviled ham was. I don't think I've ever actually had it. Braunschweiger I have and still do. Was it ever really mainstream, though? It just strikes me like something some folks in the Midwest or Great Lakes states ate and nobody else.
  #67  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:08 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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I've eaten, still eat, and enjoy most everything mentioned. In a world of kale nibblers and $18 organic rotisserie chickens, I guess I'm just an old fashioned peasant......I LOVE chicken a la king, I buy the little Swanson cans once in a while and doctor it up with mushrooms and sherry, over rice.....Bought Square Meals years ago, have given several copies as presents, and have cooked quite a few of the recipes, too. Which brings me to my contribution, does anyone bake Indian Pudding any more, or even know what it IS? I always cook a big pyrex casserole on the coldest days since it takes so long to bake, delicious stuff hot or cold, with vanilla ice cream. .... Oh, and oyster stew, does anyone eat, buy, or make oyster stew any more?

Braunschweiger? Jah! und Liederkranz cheese. (I'm not German, but I do live in the Great Lakes area. Liverwurst is all over, there are lots of brands. I don't dare buy it often, I love it too much.

Last edited by salinqmind; 12-23-2016 at 11:11 PM.
  #68  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:09 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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I picked up a can of Underwood's Deviled Ham just a few hours ago. I always try to have a can or two on hand for rainy day snacking. Makes good sandwiches and a kiss-ass dip, suitably doctored up.
  #69  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:15 PM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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Originally Posted by Inner Stickler View Post
Hams baked with pineapple rings and cherries in the center of each ring
My Thanksgiving ham this year.
  #70  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:24 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Back in the late '60s I had a part-time job setting up luncheons and fashion shows in an upscale department store. Our typical menu consisted of:

Shrimp cocktail
Chicken a la king, beef stroganoff or chicken chow mein
Tomato aspic or Waldorf salad
Fruit cup
Scoop of ice cream or sherbet with lady fingers
Coffee or Sanka

And of course an ash tray and imprinted matches by every place setting.
  #71  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:26 PM
Emily Litella Emily Litella is offline
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Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
See what happens when you don't let your kids play with their food? That's what I blame Nouvelle Cuisine on too.

My 2 cents: Beef Stroganoff, or Beef Bourguignon, or any kind of meat with sauce over egg noodles.

Fondue or appetizers that had toothpicks stuck in 'em.
  #72  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:39 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Emily Litella View Post
See what happens when you don't let your kids play with their food? That's what I blame Nouvelle Cuisine on too.

My 2 cents: Beef Stroganoff, or Beef Bourguignon, or any kind of meat with sauce over egg noodles.

Fondue or appetizers that had toothpicks stuck in 'em.
Fondue I agree with. As for toothpicked appetizers -- I mean, for passed hors d'oeuvres at a dinner party or wedding/ecent cocktail hour, I still see those a lot. As an appetizer order in a restaurant, yeah, not so much. Haven't noticed the meat over noodles thing, though.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-23-2016 at 11:40 PM.
  #73  
Old 12-24-2016, 03:18 AM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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Anything served " Picasso" so, with a serving of canned fruit. Fish Picasso, for instance, was a popular dish in upscale restaurants.

Canned fruit in general. A bunch of orange and yellow sweetish chunks with round thingies dyed red - cherries maybe ?

Sucade: one or two colored sugared firm berries served on top of grilled meat.


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  #74  
Old 12-24-2016, 03:28 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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Porringers.
  #75  
Old 12-24-2016, 04:32 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Anyway: We're at the tail end of the Baby Boomer generation and liver is definitely not something anyone my age or younger seems to voluntarily eat - I've certainly never heard of anyone saying "Yumm, fixing liver for dinner!". My mother loved it, as does my mother in law. Part of its loss of populariity may well be that it isn't really all that good for you especially given that its benefits (iron, protein) are readily available in the modern diet in less cholesterol-heavy forms.
Liver actually IS good for you if you're physically active - lots of good minerals and the fat/cholesterol wasn't much of a problem for people who did physical labor and might not always have sufficient calories. Back when getting a nutritionally complete diet was a much more difficult task than today people might have craved things like liver, particularly if one's diet otherwise was composed mainly of bland stuff like bread, peas, and cabbage.

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Originally Posted by Inner Stickler View Post
Hams baked with pineapple rings and cherries in the center of each ring
We had that served for our company Christmas party a couple weeks ago.

Quote:
Salisbury Steak
On the menu everywhere around here in "family diners" and the like.

One thing about Salisbury Steak - it's soft, being formed of chopped meat. People with few or no teeth, or other dental issues, might prefer that over steak and the like because it's a lot easier to chew (or gum, depending on how bad off you are). Tooth loss used to be much more of a problem, which might be one reason why chopped/creamed meats used to be much more common in the past.

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Originally Posted by mistymage View Post
Eww...too many carbs!! Although I did once enjoy a mock apple pie made with Ritz. I guess there are a few recipes for Ritz Salad: http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-..._salad,FF.html
The mock apple pie, from what I understand, was a Depression-era recipe - that generation probably had memories of it as a childhood food but these days people can easily get apples for real apple pie, and it's perceived as better or healthier than a plate of Ritz crackers, so...

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Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
It's probably true that liver is rarely served as a meal nowadays, assuming it ever was particularly popular, but duck, goose, and/or chicken liver is still widely used in paté and just ordinary liverwurst, which are great snack foods. So, not entirely evil. Not sure what one does with cattle liver, though -- I sure wouldn't eat it!
Have a family recipe for chopped liver that uses beef liver and it's yummy - I've encountered the same or similar thing at Jewish delis. Basically a variation on pate, though.

Liver is pretty strongly flavored in a "gamey" manner, I think that whole genre of food is out of fashion. I run into a lot of people who don't like things like dark meat chicken or turkey, or duck but prefer the blander white meat. Given tastes like that I can see where liver isn't as popular as it used to be. These days folks get strong flavor from capsaicin-based sauces it seems, not so much "game" flavor.

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Originally Posted by Maastricht View Post
Canned salmon. It was considered the height of luxury when I was a kid.

Elaborate alcoholic cocktails, made from a home bar. Too bad this one is gone.

Canned vegetables, its more frozen veggies now.
I think the canned fish and vegetables have fallen out of favor due to fresh versions being perceived as healthier/upscale/better. Also, you can get fresh fish and vegetables all year round, and in places like the center of a continent which wasn't the case when my parents were kids. You ate preserved fish (like canned) because often that's what was available, particularly for ocean fish (they lived in St. Louis, pretty far from the sea, and you probably didn't want to eat anything that had been swimming in the three big rivers of that city). You ate canned vegetables in the winter because that's what was available.

The elaborate cocktails have gone out of fashion partly because heavy drinking isn't as tolerated as it once was. Having several drinks a day was seen as normal in my parent's generation (once Prohibition was repealed), and prior to Prohibition people started drinking pretty early in the day by our standards. We just consume less alcohol. That category has been replaced by fancy coffee drinks, smoothies, juice bars, and so forth. Also, stuff like craft beers and an explosion of wine offerings, which you purchase ready-made instead of concocting yourself, just as people no longer make meals from scratch as the default.

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Originally Posted by bobot View Post
I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
Yeah - I started making tuna noodle casserole with the potato chips on top because the spouse requested it. I find crushing the chips to be the most annoying part of the whole process.

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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
You know what was weird? My Mom used to make something called "city chicken" in the '60s in Cleveland -- it was veal skewered on little wood skewers, and it tasted like crap.

At the time, veal was cheaper than actual chicken? Hard to believe these days, when veal scallopini is fetching $22 a pound at Whole Foods.
"City chicken" is also a euphemism for pigeon, which, apparently fed quite a few people during hte Depression days and allegedly some of the homeless these days. Also, I think rabbits have occasionally served the same role, but pigeons being birds and all fit the "chicken" part of the term better.

Veal used to be cheaper than chicken because veal was the unwanted male diary calves - farmers ate them rather than letting the meat go to waste. Then veal got trendy and/or popular and suddenly veal calves were valuable in their own right, leading to people trying to grow them as big as they could before they lost "veal" qualities, which of course cost money and drove the cost up.

This has been true of certain other foods that were regarded as "garbage" foods that became popular for whatever reason. Lobsters famously used to be fed to prisoners because they were so cheap, and at one point in New England prisoners demanded to be fed lobster no more than three times per week. Now it's a luxury food.

[QUOTE=Arizona Mike;19874800]Braunschweiger[/qupte]
Mmmmm.... Braunschweiger! Had it for lunch yesterday. Think it's in the category of German food which used to be a lot more popular. German-Americans have sort of melted into the background in the US but they used to be much more distinct as an ethnic group here and German food used to be much more popular in the past.
  #76  
Old 12-24-2016, 05:42 AM
toast pakora toast pakora is offline
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My mother had a collection of cookbooks from the 40s and 50s. Boiled? lettuce was a recipe. I see it in stir frys now.

Funny how macaroni and cheese is still popular.
  #77  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:10 AM
amarone amarone is offline
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Mushy peas are a British thing, often served along with bangers and mash (grilled sausages and mashed potatoes). They're just what the name implies, and it's like eating very thick pea soup.
With fish and chips is the best way.
  #78  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:20 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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For everyone's information: My "Ritz Salad" joke was a reference to Fawlty Towers. Until yesterday, I had no idea there really are such things (though I had, of course, heard about mock apple pie, which was once given a good send-up on Frasier).
  #79  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:17 AM
ch51 ch51 is offline
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That's where I assumed you were coming from ...
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Old 12-24-2016, 10:27 AM
stillownedbysetters stillownedbysetters is offline
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MSN's home page this morning (12/24) features an article from The Atlantic that offers insight on the hows and whys of America's mid-century love affair with foods in gelatins, as well as thoughts on how the Great Depression changed the way Americans eat.

Worth a read.
  #81  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:42 AM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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Fondue made a comeback and is offered in many restaurants now. I have two electric pots and usually make it once a year, just because I love it.
Back in the '80s I used to work for a Catholic high school for girls. They decided to discontinue their home ec classes and sold off all the kitchen equipment. I bought one of the fondue pots (Harvest Gold!) and still have it. I make us some fondue once or a twice a year. There are also a couple restaurants in my area which popped up in the last 5 years or so that specialize in fondue, but are (imo) much too pricey to be worth visiting.

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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I do, too! Stouffer's used to have frozen Welsh Rarebit (savory cheese sauce) that was yummy by itself over toast, or better, with bacon and a slice of tomato on that toast then cheese sauce poured over. Can't find it anymore.
I loved this too, and was bummed to not be able to find it any more.

Other stuff I haven't seen on menus for a long time: Lobster Newburg (yet another sauced thing on toast) and Lobster Thermidor (sauced thing not on toast!).

I have the recent reissue of Vincent Price's cookbook, which features recipes from famous restaurants of his time. There's all kinds of recipes in there for things you'd almost never see in a restaurant now (fried cucumbers, fruit soup, ring mold salads with vegetables in them, etc.)
  #82  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:53 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by Bayard View Post
A while back I watched The Blues Brothers again. There's a scene where they go into a vert fancy restaurant to recruit one of the band members, who's working as a waiter there. They order shrimp cocktail. In movies and TV at least, shrimp cocktail used to be the signal that you were in a classy joint. I can't remember the last time I saw it on a menu or heard of anyone having it.
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  #83  
Old 12-24-2016, 11:13 AM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is online now
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Originally Posted by bobot View Post
I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
Love it! One of nature's most perfect foods.
  #84  
Old 12-24-2016, 12:13 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by ch51 View Post
That's where I assumed you were coming from ...
Apparently, not everyone did.
  #85  
Old 12-24-2016, 12:15 PM
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For my fellow tuna casserole lovers, here's a really good fancy version of the dish. I've made it several times.

I still make the mushroom-soup version, but it's kinda fun to dress it up sometimes.
  #86  
Old 12-24-2016, 12:27 PM
Dr. Girlfriend Dr. Girlfriend is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I do, too! Stouffer's used to have frozen Welsh Rarebit (savory cheese sauce) that was yummy by itself over toast, or better, with bacon and a slice of tomato on that toast then cheese sauce poured over. Can't find it anymore.
This stuff was great, I bought it a couple of times and ate it over toasted sourdough bread.
Then it disappeared completely, haven't seen it in years.

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Originally Posted by Aspenglow View Post
Also, Beef Wellington.
I just had Beef Wellington appetizers at my company's Christmas party a couple of weeks ago. Loved it, it was better than the steak I had for my entree.
  #87  
Old 12-24-2016, 12:31 PM
longhair75 longhair75 is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Chicken a la King

Maybe we could generalize to "creamed <anything> on toast" is out of fashion.

My mother (not a great cook) used to do creamed hamburger on toast and also something she called "corned beef and English peas" which was also sauce-y and served over toast. The corned beef was from a square can, and I don't know what it was about the (canned) peas that made them English.
I made Chicken Ala King for dinner Thursday night......
  #88  
Old 12-24-2016, 12:36 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
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A generation-older coworker mentioned that she enjoyed chop suey from a local Chinese takeout place. It occurred to me that I couldn't say for certain what it is. Looking up some recipes, it appears to be just about anything stir fried with a sauce but I'm thinking most places will have one thing in common: bland.

I haven't had mint jelly in at least 30 years.
  #89  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:00 PM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
  #90  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Sauerbraten (mostly because of the disappearance of German food in general)
You obviously haven't tried to get into this restaurant on a Saturday night.

We had our family Christmas there last week, and lo and behold, my nephew ordered sauerbraten.
  #91  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:30 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
Yo!

Sloppy Joes are a standard weekday meal around Casa Silenus. That and a side salad and we're ready for Jeopardy!

I'm old, bite me!
  #92  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:31 PM
Emily Litella Emily Litella is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
Not that I've heard of in a few decades. The canned sauce was adverized on TV for making a "Manwich", which was poured over browned chopped meat. Same thing.

I think they still sell Steak 'Ums, you could make your own Philly Cheese steak sandwiches.
  #93  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:36 PM
Aspenglow Aspenglow is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr. Girlfriend View Post
I just had Beef Wellington appetizers at my company's Christmas party a couple of weeks ago. Loved it, it was better than the steak I had for my entree.
LOL, that is so cool! When was the last time you had it before that?

I do think some of the old standards are coming back, partly due to nostalgia -- and partly because some of them were pretty good.
  #94  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:39 PM
Athena Athena is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
Yep. I make 'em from scratch, usually ends up being onions, garlic, bell peppers sauteed, add in some hamburger and a can of diced tomatoes, then start layering on ketchup/tomato sauce/molasses/hot sauce/salsa/spices until it tastes the way I want. Yum!
  #95  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:52 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily Litella View Post
Not that I've heard of in a few decades. The canned sauce was adverized on TV for making a "Manwich", which was poured over browned chopped meat. Same thing.
You can still get Manwich in a can ... vile stuff. And when I was a kid, the school cafeteria featured sloppy joes at least twice a week.
  #96  
Old 12-24-2016, 01:53 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Re: Meat and Sauce over Noodles

I still do Beef Stroganoff once in a while. You have to do it real Russian-style, not 1950s suburban style -- serve the meat, dry, in one platter; the onion/mushroom/sour cream sauce in another bowl; and the kasha in a third bowl. And it has to be kasha, no screwing around with rice or noodles.

Not too much sour cream in the sauce; suburban Moms always made way too much sauce...don't add water or stock, just use the juices left in the pan after the beef and vegetables have been seared.

I still see Chicken Paprikas offered in Wisconsin and other Central European-heavy parts of the country. A brief vogue for Austrian and German cuisine here in NYC has yielded some darn good stuff. Noodles are usually passed over in favor of spaetzle or csipetke or some similar dumpling.
  #97  
Old 12-24-2016, 02:20 PM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Yo!

Sloppy Joes are a standard weekday meal around Casa Silenus. That and a side salad and we're ready for Jeopardy!

I'm old, bite me!
I don't make them often, but we did just have them a few weeks ago. I really enjoyed them.
  #98  
Old 12-24-2016, 02:42 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Athena View Post
Yep. I make 'em from scratch, usually ends up being onions, garlic, bell peppers sauteed, add in some hamburger and a can of diced tomatoes, then start layering on ketchup/tomato sauce/molasses/hot sauce/salsa/spices until it tastes the way I want. Yum!
This is pretty much our procedure as well, except the onions are added last since the wife doesn't like them. The local grocery carries huge hamburger buns with sesame seeds that are perfect for Sloppy Joes.
  #99  
Old 12-24-2016, 02:50 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is online now
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Cracked did some articles where they tested these recipes a while ago.

-7 Gross Foods Your Grandparents Ate (That We Taste Tested)

-7 More Disgusting Foods Your Grandparents Ate (Taste-Tested)

-6 Gross Foods from a 50's Cookbook (That We Taste Tested)

(The results were pretty much what you thought they'd be)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I just looked it up on Wiki. It's still pretty popular in the Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Toledo area of the Great Lakes (looks like Chicago is safe!), but they make it with pork now.

I remember it as being unpleasantly DRY. Maybe Mom was too lazy to make gravy.
Yeah, it's a major Pittsburgh thing. You can even buy it pre-cut with the little skewers at the grocery stores here. I've never been a big fan. Apparently it was popular during the Depression.

Stroganoff is outdated? My mother makes the BEST beef Stroganoff. It's one of my favorites!
  #100  
Old 12-24-2016, 02:52 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
Yep. Only we call them Hot Tamales.
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