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  #101  
Old 12-24-2016, 04:11 PM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Have a family recipe for chopped liver that uses beef liver and it's yummy - I've encountered the same or similar thing at Jewish delis. Basically a variation on pate, though.
Just a comment about this "chopped liver" thing. Yes, I said that I enjoyed various liver patés from duck, goose, and chicken and couldn't imagine eating beef liver as a meal. But "chopped liver" is a whole other thing. I remember visiting an upscale grocery around Easter one time which I think coincided with the Jewish Passover, and their deli counter had chopped liver for a very limited time from one of the most famous and authentic restaurants in Montreal. I bought some just to try, and basically I inhaled the whole thing and rushed back the next day to get a large vat of this delicious delicacy. Authentic Jewish-style chopped liver is truly fantastic stuff!
  #102  
Old 12-24-2016, 05:09 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Yo!

Sloppy Joes are a standard weekday meal around Casa Silenus. That and a side salad and we're ready for Jeopardy!

I'm old, bite me!
Didn't you just buy a house? That's all you're going to be able to afford for dinner for some time...!
  #103  
Old 12-24-2016, 05:31 PM
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Still see liver in plenty of "family" restaurants (which are basically slightly fancier diners). I've never had it, don't intend to order a meal just to find out possibly I don't like it, but it's out there if you're eating places other than fancy shmancy, ethnic, and/or chain restaurants.

(and mushrooms taste like they're grown on the devil's taint, yuck.)
  #104  
Old 12-24-2016, 05:34 PM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Tuna-noodle casserole comes to mind. It's just not something you hear much about anymore, though on those rare occasions I have it, I quite like it - I have a tuna lasagna recipe that is basically TNC in a slightly different form factor.
Favorite growing up along with creamed chipped beef on toast.
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Fondue made a comeback and is offered in many restaurants now. I have two electric pots and usually make it once a year, just because I love it.
We do fondue for News Year Eve en famile - usually Digby's ToastySpoo [cream cheese, brie with the rind cut off and butter, melted into fondue with a dash of nutmeg and cayenne] hot pot [chicken broth heated to under boiling] and chocolate for dessert. Dipping goodies include precooked pearled onions, precooked baby potatoes, precooked brocolli and cauliflower florettes, precooked asparagus, and thin sliced beef, chicken, raw shrimp and tofu cubes [the pre fried kind you normally just pop in hot oil and serve as an appetizer, but they stay together better than 'raw tofu'] sour dough bread cubes, and the dessert dippies typically are cubes of pound cake, hothouse strawberries, mandarin orange slices and tiny marzipan cubes. Any meat and veggie leftovers are frequently dumped willy nilly into the broth and turned into soup.
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Sauerbraten (mostly because of the disappearance of German food in general)
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Originally Posted by Trancephalic View Post
I DEMAND HASENPFEFFER!
Somebody should've told my ma.
I cook hasenpfeffer [you can also pickle chicken instead, tastes pretty much just like it.] and sauerbraten frequently enough, but we have a long tradition of German cooking in my family. I also cut my own spaetzel when in the mood for egg noodles.
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Americans HATE organ meats. I'm amazed that the liver-and-onions eaters are only a generation behind us..
I have shared my recipe for braised heart enough times online, but it is simple and a serious comfort food for me. Red wine, onions, garlic, herbs, heart. Bake sealed in a casserole dish for a few hours til tender. Nom with crusty bread and a salad.
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Oatmeal has had a resurgence, but it seems like Cream of Wheat (farina).
I tend to have oatmeal, but do like farina enough to have it a few times a month instead of oatmeal.
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Deviled eggs
Love them, make them.
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I actually had to look up what deviled ham was. I don't think I've ever actually had it. Braunschweiger I have and still do. Was it ever really mainstream, though? It just strikes me like something some folks in the Midwest or Great Lakes states ate and nobody else.
Love and make deviled ham when I get a ham - old school food preservation - potted meats - cook all the water out of the meat, seal under a layer of fat to keep air outand you are golden keeping it at 40F for months at a time. Nothing quite like a sandwich of deviled ham, paper thin sliced red onion on rye - hellish evil breath afterwards, but runs a second to braunschweiger, onion on rye for me.
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Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
Which brings me to my contribution, does anyone bake Indian Pudding any more, or even know what it IS?
Yup, made it this past Thanksgiving =) It hits the rotation at least once a month in cold weather. Normally I make the Durgin Park recipe, but this year I made the one from Jas Townsend & Son's youtube channel. Molded rather than blorped out with a spoon, and I served it with the 17h century version of brandied hard sauce instead of ice cream. Most nummy.

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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I still do Beef Stroganoff once in a while.
I make a version I learned decades ago - thin slice the beef, thin slice onion, layer beef, onions and sprinkle with fresh ground pepper. Drizzle on some vodka, set aside to 'marinade' overnight in the fridge [or on the backporch if it is winter out] Dollop butter into a heavy skillet, dump the meat and onions into a bowl without any vodka drippings and swish around with some flour. Drop into the hot skillet and fry up til pretty much finished cooking. While that is going on, cook your choice of starch [I was given the options of boiled potatoes, buckwheat kasha or noodles] and when it is just about done, dump over your serving bowl of starch. Sour cream is served on the side. Mushrooms are normally done with it, but as I am deathly allergic I leave them out =)
  #105  
Old 12-24-2016, 05:36 PM
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The restaurant I ate at just yesterday evening has liver and onions on the menu. In fact, that's what my BIL had, and a cousin. (There were twenty three of us in all) And the cafe I like to eat breakfast at has liver and onions on the menu. I don't think it's quite as rare as people think.
  #106  
Old 12-24-2016, 06:34 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
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This thread is great! I'm getting ideas for all sorts of dishes I'd forgotten about. Will have fun trying them out.
  #107  
Old 12-24-2016, 07:00 PM
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I definitely remember shrimp cocktails as being a 'you're at a nice restaurant' signal. I can't think of too many that I grew up with in the 80s that you don't see any more - they may not present as high-end, but they're still eaten.

One 'not a dish' that I remember is that ordinary American Chinese food was considered an exotic thing when I was growing up, it was something we were encouraged to go try as an experience, and a history class of mine did a field trip to eat at a Chinese restaurant one time. Now pretty much everyone considers Chinese take-out something about as common as McDonalds.

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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
I've seen a lot of old cookbooks from the early-to-mid-20th century and they all seem to have a rather curious obsession with aspic, gelatin, and all other sorts of gelatinized dishes, often in what I would consider quite odd pairings. I was born in the late 70s and I've not seen anything like any of that, well, ever.
I think it's because gelatin was an exotic thing that you'd only see at high-end special occasions, then with home refrigeration and mass production it became something anyone could do. There was a combination of showing off by making an exotic food with the idea that if it's from a high-end place, it must be really good. And then once you start having a lot of people making gelatin dishes, it just kind of takes on a life of its own until people come to their senses.

I was born in the 1970s and missed the craze, but growing up there were still a lot of 'fruit cocktail floating in jello' dishes around that you basically don't see today.
  #108  
Old 12-24-2016, 07:25 PM
Spoons Spoons is offline
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
I do. I take the easy way out and use Manwich sauce, but I like the result.

And all the gelatin. I'm old enough to remember when my Mom would make aspic, and it sure didn't appeal to us kids. Thankfully, Mom eventually tired of making it, and I haven't seen it anywhere since.
  #109  
Old 12-24-2016, 07:26 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by Guinastasia View Post
Yeah, it's a major Pittsburgh thing. You can even buy it pre-cut with the little skewers at the grocery stores here. I've never been a big fan. Apparently it was popular during the Depression.
Around Binghamton, NY, they marinate the stuff in what's apparently bottled Italian dressing, skewer and GRILL them, and serve them in frankfurter rolls. "Spiedies," they call 'em. I've never had one, but the idea fascinates me.

Of course, I was also fascinated by the equally obscure "New York System" hot dog of Rhode Island until I tried them near South Kingstown and they tasted like dog food.
  #110  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:19 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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I had spiedies when I was up in Binghamton a couple months ago. The marinade is pretty similar to Italian dressing, but a bit stronger. I have some marinade at home and I can check, but you've got the right idea. Originally, they were lamb, but now it's almost all exclusively chicken or pork. They just taste like vinegary kebabs. They even sell them as a pizza topping out there.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-24-2016 at 08:20 PM.
  #111  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:26 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Monte Cristo sandwich. They were everywhere in the 80s.
Still at two places in Disneyland. Tasty, but too much for me, now.

My entry is Jello Salads. I mean, real lettuce type salads in Jello. However, the fruit salad in jello is also going away.
  #112  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:34 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
This is one of my favorite cookbooks ever. Not so much to cook from, but to read. It is hilarious, and the "Cuisine of Suburbia" is one of the best chapters. They describe an appetizer for your pseudo-Hawaiian luau, where you cut an opening in the top of a cabbage into which you insert a lighted sterno can. Then you impale cocktail franks all over the cabbage on toothpicks and have dishes of dipping sauce. The name of this masterpiece: "Flaming Cabbage-Head Weenies with Pu-Pu Sauce."

If you're the kind of person who likes to read cookbooks, don't miss this one.
I'll order it, but I have to admit I have never hear of that or anything like that, and I was around back them and had (more than) my share of such cooking at potlucks, etc.
  #113  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:36 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
Back in the late '60s I had a part-time job setting up luncheons and fashion shows in an upscale department store. Our typical menu consisted of:

Shrimp cocktail
Chicken a la king, beef stroganoff or chicken chow mein
Tomato aspic or Waldorf salad
Fruit cup
Scoop of ice cream or sherbet with lady fingers
Coffee or Sanka

And of course an ash tray and imprinted matches by every place setting.
Yep. Especially that last. Some sort of chicken in gravy/sauce would be common also.

The fruit cup and salad could be combined into Jello salad.
  #114  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:42 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
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www.midcentureymenu.com

she makes them and the husband eats them....... some good and some bad and lots inedible............

there's dinner is served 1972 which cooked a whole recipe card collection from 1972 ...now she just cooks any recipe she comes across .....
  #115  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:50 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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My mom made casseroles all the time I loved them (1940s-50s) Scalloped potatoes.

Pies from scratch. Rhubarb, or green-tomato, from the kitchen garden.

Last edited by jtur88; 12-24-2016 at 08:54 PM.
  #116  
Old 12-24-2016, 08:51 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by Guinastasia View Post
Cracked did some articles where they tested these recipes a while ago.

-7 Gross Foods Your Grandparents Ate (That We Taste Tested)

-7 More Disgusting Foods Your Grandparents Ate (Taste-Tested)

-6 Gross Foods from a 50's Cookbook (That We Taste Tested)

(The results were pretty much what you thought they'd be)

actually those are pretty bogus articles. Neither my parent or I saw any of those dishes at any time, outside of a magazine ad- where we'd make fun of them. Other than Perfection Salad and other Jello salads that is, since Moms back then would put anything in Jello.

See there's a huge difference between "recipes some food company put in a magazine" vs "Foods Your Grandparents Ate". I can look today and see equally crazy recipes in magazines, and know the chances of ever seeing them (let alone eating them) is minuscule.
  #117  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:06 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
I think it's because gelatin was an exotic thing that you'd only see at high-end special occasions, then with home refrigeration and mass production it became something anyone could do. There was a combination of showing off by making an exotic food with the idea that if it's from a high-end place, it must be really good. And then once you start having a lot of people making gelatin dishes, it just kind of takes on a life of its own until people come to their senses.
Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
  #118  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:39 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I had spiedies when I was up in Binghamton a couple months ago. The marinade is pretty similar to Italian dressing, but a bit stronger. I have some marinade at home and I can check, but you've got the right idea. Originally, they were lamb, but now it's almost all exclusively chicken or pork. They just taste like vinegary kebabs. They even sell them as a pizza topping out there.
Some street carts in NYC do kebabs that are also yanked off skewers and into a hot dog roll and doused with hot sauce; haven't had one in years but I remember them as being pretty good. Probably a downstate variant on a classic spiedie.

If you don't mind checking the label on your marinade I'd love to know what's in it besides oil, vinegar, garlic, and oregano. The Wiki article on spiedies hints at all sorts of mysterious, top-secret Binghamton-area concoctions.
  #119  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:42 PM
apollonia apollonia is offline
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We had city chicken for dinner two nights ago. Alternating chunks of pork and veal on a skewer, fried then baked to finish. Excellent with a little applesauce, or alternately marinated then grilled.
  #120  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:54 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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Originally Posted by Drunky Smurf View Post
I don't hear much about people eating long-pig since the Donner party.
According to Leonard Wibberly, long pig is a favorite of Omo Lau or Omo Levi (I forget which), especially when the US VP visits.
  #121  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:02 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Don't want to drag the thread too far off topic, but we did something similar the other day, from VEFA'S KITCHEN, the enormous Greek cookbook published by Phaidon. Absolutely delicious.

Cut pork loin into kebabs, skewer, and season with salt, pepper, and oregano. While they're grilling, brush some pita or naan with olive oil and set alongside to heat through.

Cut the flatbreads into sections on each diner's plate, then drizzle with a little hot stock to soften. Spoon a couple tblsp of thick Greek yogurt over the bread, then top with a portion of the grilled pork. Finally, spoon a simple tomato sauce -- just garlic, oil, tomatoes, salt & pepper -- over all.
  #122  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:12 PM
Hey Hey Paula Hey Hey Paula is offline
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I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
Yes, but with French's French Fried Onions on top rather than crushed potato chips. I don't make it very often anymore due to the fact that I usually end up throwing half of it out. I need to cut my recipe down by about a third, my recipe just makes too much for me and the husband.
  #123  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:19 PM
Xema Xema is offline
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Lobscouse.

Spotted dog.

Drowned baby.

Soused hog's face.

Roly-poly pudding.

Last edited by Xema; 12-24-2016 at 10:20 PM.
  #124  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:27 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is online now
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I've always wanted to try and make city chicken with actual chicken, just for kicks.
  #125  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:32 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
actually those are pretty bogus articles. Neither my parent or I saw any of those dishes at any time, outside of a magazine ad- where we'd make fun of them. Other than Perfection Salad and other Jello salads that is, since Moms back then would put anything in Jello.

See there's a huge difference between "recipes some food company put in a magazine" vs "Foods Your Grandparents Ate". I can look today and see equally crazy recipes in magazines, and know the chances of ever seeing them (let alone eating them) is minuscule.
Maybe not your grandparents but it doesn't apply to all. Some people use the phrase "like your grandmother used to make" as a compliment. That is an insult to me. Both of my grandmothers were horrible cooks. One barely cooked at all because she was usually passed out drunk or fighting with someone and the other was sweet as could be but decent cooking simply wasn't happening unless it came straight out of a box and, even then, she still misread the directions about half the time. The nice grandmother made me bastardized versions of many foods on that list. I ate them happily because it was the late 70's/early 80's and we simply didn't know any better back then.

Last edited by Shagnasty; 12-24-2016 at 10:33 PM.
  #126  
Old 12-24-2016, 11:21 PM
jayjay jayjay is offline
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Dishes that have gone out of style:

Those delft-blue faux Chinese transferware with the gardens and bridges

Depression/Carnival glass

  #127  
Old 12-24-2016, 11:33 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
Maybe not your grandparents but it doesn't apply to all. Some people use the phrase "like your grandmother used to make" as a compliment. That is an insult to me. Both of my grandmothers were horrible cooks. One barely cooked at all because she was usually passed out drunk or fighting with someone and the other was sweet as could be but decent cooking simply wasn't happening unless it came straight out of a box and, even then, she still misread the directions about half the time. The nice grandmother made me bastardized versions of many foods on that list. I ate them happily because it was the late 70's/early 80's and we simply didn't know any better back then.
Sorry to hear that. My maternal grandmother made the best Pierogi in the world. And that is not just personal opinion, they won awards. Mind you some of her boiled to death "greens" were not so great. Farm cooking, from the Old Country.

My Paternal Grandmother passed before I was born.
  #128  
Old 12-25-2016, 01:16 AM
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According to Leonard Wibberly, long pig is a favorite of Omo Lau or Omo Levi (I forget which), especially when the US VP visits.
I have that book! Plus quite a number of other he wrote. Did you ever read The Seven Hills(originally titled The Testament of Theophilus)?
  #129  
Old 12-25-2016, 03:09 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Originally Posted by nightshadea View Post
www.midcentureymenu.com

she makes them and the husband eats them....... some good and some bad and lots inedible............

there's dinner is served 1972 which cooked a whole recipe card collection from 1972 ...now she just cooks any recipe she comes across .....
http://www.midcenturymenu.com/

You misspelled your link.
  #130  
Old 12-25-2016, 03:27 AM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
One of my favorite movies ever is 'Dinner At Eight' (1933) and 'cook' labors to make a molded aspic of a British Lion for visiting uppercrust Englishmen. Aspics have long been a feature of classic French cuisine, using truffles and such for decoration. They're the kind of thing that would be served when the Prince of Wales was visiting, say, Downton Abbey.
  #131  
Old 12-25-2016, 04:34 AM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
I'm going to call bull on this. Anyone who has ever cooked with bones knows about gelatin. Gelatin has been used as a meat preservative for a long time. Fancy "French" aspic was a fad, but meat held in gelatin was always a thing, and it didn't need powdered gelatin.

Last edited by sitchensis; 12-25-2016 at 04:35 AM.
  #132  
Old 12-25-2016, 06:24 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by sitchensis View Post
I'm going to call bull on this. Anyone who has ever cooked with bones knows about gelatin. Gelatin has been used as a meat preservative for a long time. Fancy "French" aspic was a fad, but meat held in gelatin was always a thing, and it didn't need powdered gelatin.
I touched on that.

Sure, making say, chicken flavored aspic is dirt simple. I've done it myself. The problem is making clear, flavorless aspic where you could have non-chicken things floating in it that didn't taste like they were floating in chicken goo. It required further clarifying (I think egg whites were used, possibly other things) and thus an extra step and labor.

Powdered gelatin had all that labor and stuff already in it. Mix with hot water and go. Which is why modern aspic/gel recipes start with unflavored gelatin.

It's the difference between starting instructions for roasted chicken with "Go to the butcher and get a dressed, whole chicken" vs. "chase down chicken, kill, pluck, butcher..."
  #133  
Old 12-25-2016, 06:47 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
Indeed it was, as confirmed by a book I have that touches on the subject. It's a wonderful book that is sort of a combination of recipe book and Edwardian culinary history in which the authors provide recipes that try to reproduce the dishes from the surviving menus of the Titanic, relying a good deal on knowledge of the styles and cookery of the era for authenticity. They make pretty much exactly that statement as an explanation for why different kinds of aspics were regarded as such delicacies before the wide availability of commercial gelatin.

sitchensis is certainly correct that various types of jellied dishes are not necessarily difficult to make -- there is a type of traditional jellied pork dish that is common in eastern European countries, for instance, that is considered a rustic country food and has been made for ages, but this is not the same as making a refined aspic for other foods, especially delicate ones.
  #134  
Old 12-25-2016, 09:05 AM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
I touched on that.

Sure, making say, chicken flavored aspic is dirt simple. I've done it myself. The problem is making clear, flavorless aspic where you could have non-chicken things floating in it that didn't taste like they were floating in chicken goo. It required further clarifying (I think egg whites were used, possibly other things) and thus an extra step and labor.

Powdered gelatin had all that labor and stuff already in it. Mix with hot water and go. Which is why modern aspic/gel recipes start with unflavored gelatin.

It's the difference between starting instructions for roasted chicken with "Go to the butcher and get a dressed, whole chicken" vs. "chase down chicken, kill, pluck, butcher..."
PBS ran Fannie's Last Supper recently. In which outgoing America's Test Kitchen host Chris Kimball hosted a dinner based on a menu from Fannie Farmer's cookbook published at the end of the 19th century. He had a kitchen full of skilled chefs (just like on his show)--who used traditional methods. Including a wood-burning stove. The link includes the gelatin recipe made from calf hooves. Commercial gelatin was invented about that era--for households with smaller staffs. Interesting show.

My own researches extend back to 1961's edition of the New York Times Cookbook. Including rumaki like Betty Draper served. Some recipes are quite rich--to be reworked with less butter & cream or just served as very special treats. And they certainly cooked the hell out of spinach. Still, it's got some fine recipes. My Grandma's cookbooks reflect Depression poverty & Wartime rationing--so, not so fine. Although she was an excellent cook.

Among items mentioned in previous posts--some will not be missed. But quiche is still popular--not as "cuisine"--but as a hearty brunch or lunch dish. Several neighborhood place prepare "fancy" deviled eggs as appetizers; one tops each one with a freshly fried oyster. Liver & onions are served at Luby's cafeteria; they are popular soul food. Authentic Dirty Rice includes chicken livers & gizzards--alas, blander versions with only sausage or even ground beef are also common. Fancy cocktails? They are several spots featuring them--including that artisanal Tiki Bar....
  #135  
Old 12-25-2016, 09:51 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Deviled eggs and chicken Tetrazzini OUT OF STYLE? Bite your tongue, sir!

You know what was weird? My Mom used to make something called "city chicken" in the '60s in Cleveland -- it was veal skewered on little wood skewers, and it tasted like crap.

At the time, veal was cheaper than actual chicken? Hard to believe these days, when veal scallopini is fetching $22 a pound at Whole Foods.
my grandmother used to make it all the time. I liked it, but looking back she'd overcook it too. not completely dry, but definitely chewy.

basically it's been pretty common in cities which had large populations of Eastern European immigrants, basically the Coal and Rust Belts. My grandparents were from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. It's traditionally made of meat scraps/trimmings which could have been anything except usually not chicken. IIRC they hadn't moved to the ruthlessly efficient and cheap way we raise chickens today, so chicken wasn't as common or inexpensive as now.

anymore, if you find pre-assembled city chicken in a Polish meat market, it's typically just cubed pork on a skewer.
  #136  
Old 12-25-2016, 10:53 AM
Quimby Quimby is online now
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When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
Me too growing up. For maximum confusion, at some point in Northern New Jersey Sloppy Joe also came to mean a triple decker turkey sandwich with cole slow and Russian dressing but it will always be the Manwich type to me.

I thought of another one: in the 90s you couldn't go out to eat without seeing someone get served a Fajita served in a sizzling pan. It was a whole big production. That seems gone for a long time now.
  #137  
Old 12-25-2016, 11:12 AM
ioioio ioioio is online now
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Fajitas are available here at any Mexican restaurant, usually with choice of beef, chicken, or shrimp. Otherwise yes, the fad has passed.
  #138  
Old 12-25-2016, 12:12 PM
buddha_david buddha_david is offline
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Turkey tetrazzini... Chicken a la king... I thought that stuff was just made up to sell frozen dinners.
  #139  
Old 12-25-2016, 12:27 PM
silenus silenus is online now
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Those dishes were, and to some extent still are standards on the "cheap banquet" circuit. Go to a county Academic decathlon banquet in a "lesser" county sometime and that's what you will be served. Same-same at the local Oddfellows banquet. There is a trend towards healthier, less "gloppy" food, but catering menus in the hinterlands change slowly.

The US Army recipe is still on the books. Serves 100.

Last edited by silenus; 12-25-2016 at 12:29 PM.
  #140  
Old 12-25-2016, 01:19 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is online now
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Sorry to hear that. My maternal grandmother made the best Pierogi in the world. And that is not just personal opinion, they won awards. Mind you some of her boiled to death "greens" were not so great. Farm cooking, from the Old Country.

My Paternal Grandmother passed before I was born.

Oh man, we had pierogies last night -- using my grandmother's recipe. Polish/Slavic food is the best. (Of course, my grandmother also used canned vegetables -- yick)
  #141  
Old 12-25-2016, 01:32 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Oh man, we had pierogies last night -- using my grandmother's recipe. Polish/Slavic food is the best. (Of course, my grandmother also used canned vegetables -- yick)
My christmas eve dinner:

ham, kiełbasa krajana, pierogi ruskie, kapusta, and green beans.

My grandmother used to make a couple hundred pierogi every year in mid-December and give piles out to the rest of the family. she hasn't been able to do it for probably going on 15 years now. last night my dad made a batch, got pretty close. I'm the designated kiełbasa procurer; my grandfather used to do it before he passed away, getting up at the crack of dawn to go to a tiny Polish deli on Michigan Avenue just inside Detroit. Then a neighbor friend of theirs took over until he passed, then my uncle would get it until he changed jobs to too far away, at which point I took over since I worked a few miles away. then a few years ago they retired and closed up shop, and I had to go on a frantic search for something similar. Now I get it from Srodek's in Hamtramck. Kowalski and Eckrich can't hold a candle to it.
  #142  
Old 12-25-2016, 01:55 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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I don't see people using gravy boats much anymore.
  #143  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:28 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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I thought of another one: in the 90s you couldn't go out to eat without seeing someone get served a Fajita served in a sizzling pan. It was a whole big production. That seems gone for a long time now.
The Chili's chain of Mexican restaurants feature sizzling fajitas as their centerpiece.

Quote:
I don't see people using gravy boats much anymore.
My mother and I were just discussing this the other day as we were deciding on a Christmas meal. She still has hers, but rarely use it.
  #144  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:42 PM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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My christmas eve dinner:

ham, kiełbasa krajana, pierogi ruskie, kapusta, and green beans.
That's quite the feast! As you note, real kielbasa is not something you just pick up at the supermarket, which tends to vary between tasteless and awful. The real thing has a deep garlicky aroma and is no comparison to the fake stuff. Similarly, kapusta is often thought to be basically sauerkraut but the real thing is deeply browned with bacon and other ingredients and spices, so authenticity here makes all the difference in the world.

I don't know what "piergi ruskie" is specifically, but my predilection with perogies is browning them in butter and then adding chopped onions about halfway through and browning the lot, then serving with lots of rich sour cream. Yum!
  #145  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:50 PM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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I thought of another one: in the 90s you couldn't go out to eat without seeing someone get served a Fajita served in a sizzling pan. It was a whole big production. That seems gone for a long time now.
It's certainly still around at many casual restaurants -- this is typical (see "fajitas" under the main menu). It may be less prevalent than it used to be, but certainly not gone.
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I don't see people using gravy boats much anymore.
What would they use instead? If you're serving any kind of roast, especially something like prime rib with Yorkshire pudding and mashed potatoes, ISTM that a gravy boat is pretty much essential to let guests put on as much or as little gravy as they like where they like it. I can't imagine what else you'd do.
  #146  
Old 12-25-2016, 03:07 PM
silenus silenus is online now
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I think the perceived lack of gravy boatage is more due to the paucity of formal/semiformal dining occasions than to the lack of boats and/or gravy.
  #147  
Old 12-25-2016, 03:17 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
My christmas eve dinner:

ham, kiełbasa krajana, pierogi ruskie, kapusta, and green beans.
Yes, please define. Are these varenniki, pelmeni, or something else?

That meal, BTW, sounds absolutely delicious!
  #148  
Old 12-25-2016, 04:36 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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What would they use instead?
A bowl? I've used a small pitcher as well.
  #149  
Old 12-25-2016, 05:46 PM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is offline
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Originally Posted by Quimby View Post
Me too growing up. For maximum confusion, at some point in Northern New Jersey Sloppy Joe also came to mean a triple decker turkey sandwich with cole slow and Russian dressing but it will always be the Manwich type to me.

I thought of another one: in the 90s you couldn't go out to eat without seeing someone get served a Fajita served in a sizzling pan. It was a whole big production. That seems gone for a long time now.
Here in Houston, fajitas are classic at most Mexican & Tex-Mex restaurants. And we've got a bunch of them.

(That turkey sandwich sounds good.)
  #150  
Old 12-25-2016, 05:51 PM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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A bowl? I've used a small pitcher as well.
Maybe you're referring to a formal gravy boat, of which I have one that matches my formal china and hasn't been used in years. My solution to gravy needs for informal dining (which is 99.9% of it in this house) is simply to use an informal gravy boat! I have one that is basically like a small coffee cup with a spout, and I use it even for the occasional semi-formal dinner because I can't be bothered with the big ornate one. In that sense I agree with you. But one often needs some kind of vessel for passing around gravy that one pours oneself on the various food items, that's all I'm saying.
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