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  #251  
Old 12-30-2016, 07:23 AM
Saintly Loser Saintly Loser is offline
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I've been to a couple of them. They're fun when your kids are preteens and young teens -- they love the buffets where they can eat as much mac and cheese and fried potatoes and baked ziti as they can hold.

I enjoyed them because the People of Queens come out in their Sunday Go to Meetin' outfits; it's like observing a Martian landing. And some of their women are quite comely, even in the skintight neon minidresses.

The quality of the meat is atrocious, though. Sweetbreads and kidneys are not to be found.
Try Chivito de Oro or La Fusta, both in Jackson Heights. The meat is just fine, and you'll find sweetbreads and blood sausage and other organ meats in plenty.

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  #252  
Old 12-30-2016, 09:25 AM
StarvingButStrong StarvingButStrong is offline
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Ah, thank you! And with that as a search term, I bet youtube will supply...yep, here's one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU-VYesyAlA

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Originally Posted by Lionors View Post
Thank you! Actually? You gave me an idea. My great-aunt's got Alzheimer's and she's in a facility near here. A few times a week, I take her dinner or lunch - food she likes and remembers. The food's surprisingly good there, but she's not from around here and she misses regional favorites. I'll give this a shot. Much appreciated!
You're welcome. And what a lovely thing to do for your great-aunt! So many elders get stashed and forgotten.
  #253  
Old 12-30-2016, 02:40 PM
TheFaerie TheFaerie is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
A bowl? I've used a small pitcher as well.
I use my 2 cup measuring cup. Although I do have two gravy boats, they are in boxes in the store room in my basement and it's way too much trouble to dig them out than it is to use the handy measuring cup.
  #254  
Old 12-30-2016, 04:07 PM
Elemenopy Elemenopy is offline
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Too many things here to comment on individually, but I will say that I love vintage recipes and nothing is out of style at my house. (I'm not particularly fond of organ meats, but we do tripe and things like that.)

What about stuffed vegetables? Stuffed cabbage (sarma), stuffed peppers, stuffed zucchini, mayonnaise "salads" served in hollowed tomatoes? I still make these sorts of things from time to time, but they seem to have dropped off the radar lately.

Also, a few pages back, someone mentioned "spiedies" kabobs. I wonder if that's related to my husband's Sicilian family recipe for "spiedini"? Sort of like individual braciole or rouladen--pounded steak filled with a mixture of seasoned breadcrumbs, parmesan, parsley, and stewed tomato. Then rolled up on skewers and grilled or baked, and dipped in lemon-garlic butter. Yum!
  #255  
Old 12-30-2016, 04:29 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Elemenopy View Post
Also, a few pages back, someone mentioned "spiedies" kabobs. I wonder if that's related to my husband's Sicilian family recipe for "spiedini"? Sort of like individual braciole or rouladen--pounded steak filled with a mixture of seasoned breadcrumbs, parmesan, parsley, and stewed tomato. Then rolled up on skewers and grilled or baked, and dipped in lemon-garlic butter. Yum!
Well, the etymology of the word "spiedie" comes from the Italian "spiedo," meaning "spit" (as the cooking implement), so they at least share a common etymology. I believe the originator of the Spiedie is a place called Lupo's in Endicott, on Binghamton's border. The vinegary marinade shares some similarities with other dishes in the upstate/Western New York region, like Buffalo's Chiavetta's marinade (basically, a vinegary Italian dressing type of thing) and Cornell chicken (a vinegary somewhat mayo-like marinade). Binghamton's riff on it puts in on skewers, whereas the other two it's just a marinade for grilled chicken, whether whole or in parts.
  #256  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:42 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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After thinking about this some more and reading the reviews, I now think this may be brilliant.
Well, I did manage to find some chorizo Spam! The Hormel product locator claimed it wasn't available in my area, so I ordered 6 from them, but then today at the grocery store I decided to check on a lark and, lo and behold!, there it was! Success!

I fried a slice up a couple minutes ago, and my review is that it's pretty darned good, if you already enjoy Spam. Doesn't really taste all that much like chorizo to me, but it does taste almost exactly like the filling of a Tom-Tom tamale (which is a local treat--it's probably something like the filling of one of those Hormel canned hot tamale things, but I don't remember if I've ever had that.) Needless to say, I think it's quite tasty and it gets a thumbs up from me.
  #257  
Old 01-03-2017, 05:07 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
... and, lo and behold!, there it was! Success!
I was picking up a few things at my local Butera last night and did remember to check for chorizo Spam. They didn't have it, of course. Where did you find it?
  #258  
Old 01-03-2017, 05:13 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by jnglmassiv View Post
I was picking up a few things at my local Butera last night and did remember to check for chorizo Spam. They didn't have it, of course. Where did you find it?
My neighborhood Pete's Market at 43rd and Pulaski had it.
  #259  
Old 01-03-2017, 06:46 PM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I do, too! Stouffer's used to have frozen Welsh Rarebit (savory cheese sauce) that was yummy by itself over toast, or better, with bacon and a slice of tomato on that toast then cheese sauce poured over. Can't find it anymore.
On New Year's Day, the cooking newsletter I get from the NY Times revealed this!

I made it with Guinness and aged Irish cheddar. It's great.
  #260  
Old 01-03-2017, 08:35 PM
bmoak bmoak is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Well, the etymology of the word "spiedie" comes from the Italian "spiedo," meaning "spit" (as the cooking implement), so they at least share a common etymology. I believe the originator of the Spiedie is a place called Lupo's in Endicott, on Binghamton's border. The vinegary marinade shares some similarities with other dishes in the upstate/Western New York region, like Buffalo's Chiavetta's marinade (basically, a vinegary Italian dressing type of thing) and Cornell chicken (a vinegary somewhat mayo-like marinade). Binghamton's riff on it puts in on skewers, whereas the other two it's just a marinade for grilled chicken, whether whole or in parts.
IIRC the etymology is from "spiedini", meaning "skewer". It was brought to the Southern Tier by immigrants from the Abruzzo region of Italy, was called spierini or spiducc, and was marinated skwered mutton cooked over a brazier. Spiedies started off as a lamb dish, but now it's almost impossible to find lamb spiedies (Lupo's doesn't have them. Pancho's Pit did until they closed down.) I can't say about Chiavetti's (which is unknown in the Binghamton area), but spiedies definitely predate Cornell chicken.

Lupo's didn't open until the 60s, but more grandparents told me about eating spiedies at Sharkey's and Red's Kettle Inn in the late 40s. Those places are both still there and selling speidies, but neither is Italian, so presumably speidies were sold in Italian restaurants before that.
  #261  
Old 01-03-2017, 08:45 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
IIRC the etymology is from "spiedini", meaning "skewer". It was brought to the Southern Tier by immigrants from the Abruzzo region of Italy, was called spierini or spiducc, and was marinated skwered mutton cooked over a brazier. Spiedies started off as a lamb dish, but now it's almost impossible to find lamb spiedies (Lupo's doesn't have them. Pancho's Pit did until they closed down.) I can't say about Chiavetti's (which is unknown in the Binghamton area), but spiedies definitely predate Cornell chicken.

Lupo's didn't open until the 60s, but more grandparents told me about eating spiedies at Sharkey's and Red's Kettle Inn in the late 40s. Those places are both still there and selling speidies, but neither is Italian, so presumably speidies were sold in Italian restaurants before that.
"Spiedini/o" does make more sense as the immediate predecessor, but they're all ultimately related to "spiedino." "Spiedino" is just the diminutive of "spiedo" ("skewer" = "little spit.")

Yeah, I tried asking for lamb spiedies at Lupo's back in October and had no luck. I ended up going with the pork and it somehow wasn't as good as the chicken. It was a bit overdone. I did bring back some Lupo's marinade and Salamida spiedie sauce, so I plan to eventually get around to trying it with lamb.
  #262  
Old 01-03-2017, 09:33 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by romansperson View Post
On New Year's Day, the cooking newsletter I get from the NY Times revealed this!

I made it with Guinness and aged Irish cheddar. It's great.
That method ain't traditional but, by golly, it looks DELICIOUS. I'll put it on my list!
  #263  
Old 01-03-2017, 09:55 PM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
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Boston cream pie. I can't remember the last time I saw one in a bakery. Pepperidge Farm used to make a frozen one, and I can't remember the last time I saw that, either. It was awesome straight out of the freezer - they never got defrosted in our house.

I might just have to make one. Anyone have a favorite recipe?
  #264  
Old 01-03-2017, 11:16 PM
bmoak bmoak is offline
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I had Boston cream pie last week at the diner in town.
  #265  
Old 01-04-2017, 07:10 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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Boston cream pies are a staple at my local bakery.
  #266  
Old 01-04-2017, 11:38 AM
Soylent Juicy Soylent Juicy is offline
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Originally Posted by Aspenglow View Post
Also, Beef Wellington.
The only place I've ever seen Beef Wellington is on "Hell's Kitchen".

Does anybody actually make Jell-O desserts from the little box anymore? I know the single-serving cups were popular many years ago but they were kind of bland and rubbery. Count me as one of the 70's and 80's kids whose mom put canned fruit into Jell-O to make it "healthy". I freakin hated it. Speaking of canned fruit, I know they still exist but does anybody actually eat canned fruit anymore? Like those repulsive mixed fruit "salads" where you enjoyed the one or two cherries and nothing else?
  #267  
Old 01-04-2017, 11:46 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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The only place I've ever seen Beef Wellington is on "Hell's Kitchen".

Does anybody actually make Jell-O desserts from the little box anymore? I know the single-serving cups were popular many years ago but they were kind of bland and rubbery. Count me as one of the 70's and 80's kids whose mom put canned fruit into Jell-O to make it "healthy". I freakin hated it. Speaking of canned fruit, I know they still exist but does anybody actually eat canned fruit anymore? Like those repulsive mixed fruit "salads" where you enjoyed the one or two cherries and nothing else?
My wife does sometimes make the jello, but more often uses it in a couple of cake desserts she makes, especially Milnot cake. What's Milnot cake you ask? Why, it's a very light and airy cheesecake made with Milnot, a brand of "evaporated filled milk." What's "evaporated filled milk" you ask? It's evaporated milk that has had all its butterfat removed and replaced with non-dairy fat (vegetable oils, usually.) Why does it still exist? I don't know. Milnot cake is about all it exists for in my book.
  #268  
Old 01-04-2017, 12:14 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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Originally Posted by Soylent Juicy View Post
The only place I've ever seen Beef Wellington is on "Hell's Kitchen".

Does anybody actually make Jell-O desserts from the little box anymore? I know the single-serving cups were popular many years ago but they were kind of bland and rubbery. Count me as one of the 70's and 80's kids whose mom put canned fruit into Jell-O to make it "healthy". I freakin hated it. Speaking of canned fruit, I know they still exist but does anybody actually eat canned fruit anymore? Like those repulsive mixed fruit "salads" where you enjoyed the one or two cherries and nothing else?
My 80-something mother loved loved loved jello with canned fruit cocktail or sliced bananas in it. She had dementia and while still at home, I would haul a car full of supplies, and groceries over, and always a container of jello with fruit cocktail or bananas. I will never eat any of those things again. Though I have made some excellent jello mold salads for myself. Lime jello with pears and cream cheese, or pineapple and walnuts and whipped cream, there are some delicious ones out there. Though out of style now.
  #269  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:15 PM
krondys krondys is offline
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I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
At least once a month, or the kids will kill me for skipping it.
  #270  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:26 PM
krondys krondys is offline
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
And yeah, Welsh Rabbit is never seen any more. My theory is that the raging American passion for melted cheese was re-directed toward pizza after WWII.

Pizza is available everywhere, so why melt cheddar cheese into beer and mustard and pour it over toast and eat it with a fork and knife? Aside from the fact that it's delicious?
I will be making Welsh Rabbit this weekend now (attempting to, anyway). I had never heard of it until this thread!
  #271  
Old 01-04-2017, 05:29 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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I will be making Welsh Rabbit this weekend now (attempting to, anyway). I had never heard of it until this thread!
Then you should definitely use this recipe, from 1747:
Quote:
Toast the bread and soak it in the wine, set it before the fire, rub butter over the bottom of a plate, lay the cheese on, pour in two or three spoonfuls of white wine, cover it with another plate, set it over a chafing-dish of hot coals for two or three minutes, then stir it till it is done and well mixed. You may stir in a little mustard; when it is enough lay it on the bread, just brown it with a hot shovel.
  #272  
Old 01-04-2017, 05:39 PM
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And, in my part of the country, they are called Vi-EENA sausages. Often eaten on white bread with Miracle Whip.
That might be the single most disturbing post I've seen on this entire website, which is saying a lot.
  #273  
Old 01-04-2017, 07:41 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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I will be making Welsh Rabbit this weekend now (attempting to, anyway). I had never heard of it until this thread!
Pleasant dreams!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drea..._Rarebit_Fiend
  #274  
Old 01-04-2017, 08:03 PM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
My wife does sometimes make the jello, but more often uses it in a couple of cake desserts she makes, especially Milnot cake. What's Milnot cake you ask? Why, it's a very light and airy cheesecake made with Milnot, a brand of "evaporated filled milk." What's "evaporated filled milk" you ask? It's evaporated milk that has had all its butterfat removed and replaced with non-dairy fat (vegetable oils, usually.) Why does it still exist? I don't know. Milnot cake is about all it exists for in my book.
I have a recipe like this that uses Dream Whip in place of Milnot. It's pretty tasty but I find the ingredients vaguely alarming.
  #275  
Old 01-04-2017, 08:07 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Originally Posted by Elemenopy View Post
Too many things here to comment on individually, but I will say that I love vintage recipes and nothing is out of style at my house. (I'm not particularly fond of organ meats, but we do tripe and things like that.)

What about stuffed vegetables? Stuffed cabbage (sarma), stuffed peppers, stuffed zucchini, mayonnaise "salads" served in hollowed tomatoes? I still make these sorts of things from time to time, but they seem to have dropped off the radar lately.

Stuffed cabbage -- you mean halupki? You can find it anywhere in my area. Personally I've never been a fan, but if you're from a Slavic family, it's definitely a staple.
  #276  
Old 01-13-2017, 07:06 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
And yeah, Welsh Rabbit is never seen any more. My theory is that the raging American passion for melted cheese was re-directed toward pizza after WWII.

Pizza is available everywhere, so why melt cheddar cheese into beer and mustard and pour it over toast and eat it with a fork and knife? Aside from the fact that it's delicious?
It's a bit of work, especially if you use good cheese vs. pre-grated stuff from the store, but it IS delish when made with lots of horseradish and a bottle of decent-ish beer. We used to make it periodically (btw, it's **rarebit** if one is trying to be correct).

Then we had kids, and gave it up, because
SPOILER:
are you sure you want to know?
SPOILER:
No really, are you sure???
SPOILER:
Really, you're gonna regret it
SPOILER:
a breastfed baby's poop smells (and looks) a LOT like melted cheese sauce :::barf:::
.

This thread isn't the first place that Welsh Rarebit has been documented as an out-of-fashion dish.
  #277  
Old 01-13-2017, 07:19 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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...(btw, it's **rarebit** if one is trying to be correct)....
And it turns out "rabbit" IS the correct word, "rarebit" is the corruption. I thought it was the other way around.
  #278  
Old 01-13-2017, 07:50 PM
Hey Hey Paula Hey Hey Paula is offline
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It seems like every mom in my town was making "tamale pie" when I was growing up. It was vile stuff - looked like the poop of someone who had eaten a lot of whole kernel corn the day before.

I'm glad that the craze for this icky dish died out.
Tamale pie was one of my nightmare foods during the years I lived with my grandmother (early 60's). It was too spicy for my child's palate, and had an unpleasant texture and flavor. I liked real tamales when we could get them, but tamale pie was horrible.

My other nightmare foods were meatloaf with burned tomato paste on the top, and frozen breaded veal cutlets. Those cutlets must have been cheap because we had them all the time for a while. To this day I cannot stand the taste of veal.
  #279  
Old 01-25-2017, 02:10 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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I use my 2 cup measuring cup. Although I do have two gravy boats, they are in boxes in the store room in my basement and it's way too much trouble to dig them out than it is to use the handy measuring cup.
HAHAHA - we also usually just use a Pyrex measuring cup, though we put a gravy spoon in it as the cup would drip if we tried to pour from it.

We do have a gravy boat from the formal china pattern (inherited). We also have a beautiful silver gravy ladle that we use with it. It turns out silver is a very good conductor of heat when you leave it sitting in the container full of fresh, piping hot gravy!!!
  #280  
Old 01-25-2017, 10:35 AM
bump bump is offline
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Elaborate alcoholic cocktails, made from a home bar. Too bad this one is gone.
Maybe in Europe it's not common, but this one's having a revival in the US. There's an entire cocktail subculture that sort of encompasses home cocktail use, as well as bars/restaurants having interesting new signature cocktails and what-not.

I think a lot of this is more because of changing patterns in terms of what people eat- a lot of those older dishes are considered unhealthy today, and because it seems to me that a lot of people just flat-out don't cook anymore.

I also think there's been a shift in entertaining/getting together with friends; as a kid it wasn't that uncommon to go to someone else's house for a cookout or dinner or whatever, and usually everyone brought a dish. Nowadays, people tend to meet at restaurants or other venues, and not necessarily at home. So a lot of the entertaining food- stuff like ambrosia, rumaki, etc... aren't done as often as they used to be.

Finally, I think there's been a shift in price on some dishes; stuff like liver and tongue were generally stuff you bought because it was cheap; in recent decades, the "good" parts of the cow are now cheap, so tongue is rare, as is liver.
  #281  
Old 01-25-2017, 10:46 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Maybe in Europe it's not common, but this one's having a revival in the US.
Maybe it depends on what Maastricht means by "elaborate," but, at least in my circle, home bars and making cocktails at home never went out of style. Most of my friends with homes (and pretty much my whole family) have some sort of well-stocked bar with a few mixers so you can throw together a good variety of cocktails together if need be. And this is how it's always been.
  #282  
Old 01-25-2017, 11:06 AM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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Maybe it depends on what Maastricht means by "elaborate," but, at least in my circle, home bars and making cocktails at home never went out of style.
Really? Mai-Tai's, Tequila Sunrises with a little colorful umbrella with pieces of fruit, Margarita's with fresh mint and salt around the glass rim? All that stuff?
Invite me to your friend's homes, then !

Last edited by Maastricht; 01-25-2017 at 11:09 AM.
  #283  
Old 01-25-2017, 12:49 PM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Elemenopy View Post
Too many things here to comment on individually, but I will say that I love vintage recipes and nothing is out of style at my house. (I'm not particularly fond of organ meats, but we do tripe and things like that.)

What about stuffed vegetables? Stuffed cabbage (sarma), stuffed peppers, stuffed zucchini, mayonnaise "salads" served in hollowed tomatoes? I still make these sorts of things from time to time, but they seem to have dropped off the radar lately.

Also, a few pages back, someone mentioned "spiedies" kabobs. I wonder if that's related to my husband's Sicilian family recipe for "spiedini"? Sort of like individual braciole or rouladen--pounded steak filled with a mixture of seasoned breadcrumbs, parmesan, parsley, and stewed tomato. Then rolled up on skewers and grilled or baked, and dipped in lemon-garlic butter. Yum!
I haven't made stuffed cabbage in ages, really because my husband isn't a fan. I do make a version of a stuffed cabbage casserole, if you will. All the flavors except the cabbage is coarsely chopped and everything is mixed together. My daughter and I enjoy it, and in fact, I was thinking about making some this weekend.
  #284  
Old 01-25-2017, 12:52 PM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Eva Luna View Post
Boston cream pie. I can't remember the last time I saw one in a bakery. Pepperidge Farm used to make a frozen one, and I can't remember the last time I saw that, either. It was awesome straight out of the freezer - they never got defrosted in our house.

I might just have to make one. Anyone have a favorite recipe?
I'm not sure about the pies, I haven't been looking for one, but I know Boston cream doughnuts are usually readily available. They are my daughter's favorite.
  #285  
Old 01-25-2017, 01:36 PM
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I'm surprised to see shrimp cocktail on these lists. Any mid-priced restaurant with any kind of seafood selection around here has one. It is true that it no longer represents high-end luxury the way it once did.
  #286  
Old 01-25-2017, 01:53 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Really? Mai-Tai's, Tequila Sunrises with a little colorful umbrella with pieces of fruit, Margarita's with fresh mint and salt around the glass rim? All that stuff?
Invite me to your friend's homes, then !
1. Come on by! 2. Anybody who puts mint within 100 meters of a Margarita ought to be horse-whipped. c. We have a whole set of cocktail umbrellas that look just like Kaylee's parasol on Firefly. IV. The fruit gives you your morning fiber!
  #287  
Old 01-25-2017, 02:02 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Maastricht View Post
Really? Mai-Tai's, Tequila Sunrises with a little colorful umbrella with pieces of fruit, Margarita's with fresh mint and salt around the glass rim? All that stuff?
Invite me to your friend's homes, then !
Mint in a margarita? What the hell do you crazy Hollanders do out there?

But, yes, mint from the garden for a proper mojito. The colorful umbrellas can be found only in some of my friends' bars, but toothpicks with olives, maraschino cherries, citrus slices? Sure. Maybe not at all times, but when expecting company for cocktails, certainly.

More typical cocktails would be gin & tonics (with lime, of course), manhattans, old fashioneds (with maraschino and orange), martinis (with olive). Long island iced tea. Gimlets. Maybe tequila sunrise. Not unusual. But I hang around with drinkers, so there's that. Polish people kind of take pride in the variety and amount of liquor in their bar (my parent's bar probably has around 50-70 bottles of liquor in it.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-25-2017 at 02:07 PM.
  #288  
Old 01-25-2017, 07:28 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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We should start another thread on Cocktails That Have Gone Out of Style.

I enjoy an occasional Bronx, myself.

http://imbibemagazine.com/recipe-bronx-cocktail/

Last edited by Ukulele Ike; 01-25-2017 at 07:32 PM. Reason: Link fixed
  #289  
Old 01-26-2017, 08:33 AM
bump bump is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Maybe it depends on what Maastricht means by "elaborate," but, at least in my circle, home bars and making cocktails at home never went out of style. Most of my friends with homes (and pretty much my whole family) have some sort of well-stocked bar with a few mixers so you can throw together a good variety of cocktails together if need be. And this is how it's always been.
At least in the circles I've run in, most people always drank beer and wine, and if they branched out at bars, it was almost always in the form of some kind of highball- rum & coke, whiskey & coke, gin & tonic, vodka & tonic, etc... If not that, then some kind of "shot", meaning something meant to be downed in a single gulp, typically in a communal setting (i.e. "let's have shots!" meant that everyone was having one at the same time) Often these were closer to what we'd call an "elaborate cocktail" in terms of ingredients, but in terms of the actual drinking experience, they were light years away.

But now that it's a trend to have "craft" cocktails at any restaurant that's not a nationwide chain, the people I know are much more likely to actually drink those, and a few of us have actually turned it into something of a hobby. Another thing to note is that magazines like "Texas Monthly" publish cocktail recipes from notable restaurants and bars in the state as a regular thing. I don't recall that being a common practice until the past few years.
  #290  
Old 01-26-2017, 10:43 AM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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Huh. Now that's a trend I'd be a fan of.

No normal Dutch modern household has a bar, let alone one with stuff for making cocktails. Dutch houses -and kitchens- are small anyway, and if people splurge on anything to impress guests with, it's more likely to be an elaborate barista-like coffee machine. I always find those things overly large, sometimes they are as big as a diswasher, in an otherwise miniature kitchen. That trend is past its prime at the moment, though. The current It thing is steam ovens, I believe.

A Dutch a beer enthusiast will have a collection of beers, each with the right glass. Same for a whiskey fan or a wine aficionado. But usually people will be just one of these. It's hard to find a beer fan that is also a wine connoiseur, or vice versa.

Some cocktails hav made a recent come back in our hipper bars. More and more bars serve mojito's ( that is the one with the mint, you're right). They have the mint handy anyway for all those ladies requesting fresh mint tea.
Two summers ago, all Dutch terraces served the Hugo. Last summer it was the Spritz Aperol.

But anyway, only some Mexican chain restaurants serve a wider variety of cocktails. Which I can't order because then I have to drive home. But the few times I ordered one, I found them to be a "party in a glass" I love cocktails ! .
  #291  
Old 01-26-2017, 11:52 AM
bump bump is offline
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Huh. Now that's a trend I'd be a fan of.

No normal Dutch modern household has a bar, let alone one with stuff for making cocktails. Dutch houses -and kitchens- are small anyway, and if people splurge on anything to impress guests with, it's more likely to be an elaborate barista-like coffee machine. I always find those things overly large, sometimes they are as big as a diswasher, in an otherwise miniature kitchen. That trend is past its prime at the moment, though. The current It thing is steam ovens, I believe.

A Dutch a beer enthusiast will have a collection of beers, each with the right glass. Same for a whiskey fan or a wine aficionado. But usually people will be just one of these. It's hard to find a beer fan that is also a wine connoiseur, or vice versa.

Some cocktails hav made a recent come back in our hipper bars. More and more bars serve mojito's ( that is the one with the mint, you're right). They have the mint handy anyway for all those ladies requesting fresh mint tea.
Two summers ago, all Dutch terraces served the Hugo. Last summer it was the Spritz Aperol.

But anyway, only some Mexican chain restaurants serve a wider variety of cocktails. Which I can't order because then I have to drive home. But the few times I ordered one, I found them to be a "party in a glass" I love cocktails ! .
Yeah, my time in the Netherlands led me to believe that it's primarily a beer and wine nation, or of people who like particular spirits. I actually took the father of the groom at the wedding I went to over there a bottle of artisanal bourbon because he fancies himself a connoisseur, but can't get much other than the mass-market stuff. He about fell over when I gave it to him.

That's interesting about the Mexican restaurant thing; here they pretty much serve beer, margaritas and some have a very wide variety of tequila/mescal for sipping. Not much else in the way of cocktails. Some may have a frozen sangria that they use in conjunction with their frozen margaritas for some drinks.

Here's a drink that Texas Monthly published and that I've actually had in the wild, so to speak. It's excellent.

Ode to Warsaw.
  #292  
Old 01-26-2017, 11:54 AM
doreen doreen is offline
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I'm surprised to see shrimp cocktail on these lists. Any mid-priced restaurant with any kind of seafood selection around here has one. It is true that it no longer represents high-end luxury the way it once did.
Really? I haven't seen it in years. Most places have some sort of shrimp appetizer on the menu, but it's usually something like grilled shrimp or coconut shrimp. Some restaurants (mainly buffets) have peel and eat shrimp, but that's not quite the same as the old fashioned shrimp cocktail served in a glass containing cocktail sauce with 3-5 jumbo shrimp perched on the rim.
  #293  
Old 01-26-2017, 01:10 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Maastricht View Post
Dutch houses -and kitchens- are small anyway, and if people splurge on anything to impress guests with, it's more likely to be an ela

Yeah, the size of the house matters. It's typically not in the kitchen, though, at least not around here. My parents have it off the family room. My brother has it downstairs in a secondary entertainment room (we might call it a "den.") A finished basement is another popular spot for them. This would be for a house around 120 square meters.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-26-2017 at 01:10 PM.
  #294  
Old 01-26-2017, 01:50 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Originally Posted by Hey Hey Paula View Post
My other nightmare foods were meatloaf with burned tomato paste on the top, and frozen breaded veal cutlets. Those cutlets must have been cheap because we had them all the time for a while. To this day I cannot stand the taste of veal.
I think the mistake many people make with the sauce/ketchup on meatloaf is putting it on way too early in the cooking process. Ideally, you should wait until the loaf itself is finished cooking, and then apply the sauce and pop it back in the oven for another 5-10 minutes. Or, even better, mix it into the raw mixture. That way it imparts its flavor and also makes the end product more moist.


One restaurant item I recall from my childhood that I never see any more is the "bacon & egg sandwich". I suppose this has simply evolved into the modern "breakfast sandwich" that is typically made with an English muffin or biscuit, but the "breakfast sandwich" is generally considered, as the name implies, a breakfast food. The bacon & egg sandwiches I remember from the 1970s were served on toast, with mayonnaise, and appeared on lunch and dinner menus.
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