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  #101  
Old 01-22-2017, 08:47 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by aldiboronti View Post
What song did the Sirens sing?
"Go to sleep, little babe."
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  #102  
Old 01-22-2017, 09:45 PM
zamboniracer zamboniracer is offline
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As the Master Cecil asked early on, "Did the Corinthians ever write back?"
  #103  
Old 01-23-2017, 11:42 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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Re: TroutMan's response to my Brazil query.

It's Monday. I'm not ready for this.
  #104  
Old 01-23-2017, 11:53 AM
PAjoe PAjoe is offline
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Was the hill billy that they killed in Deliverance really one of the bad guys?
  #105  
Old 01-23-2017, 12:23 PM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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Originally Posted by Jim's Son View Post
In the "Moonlighting" tv Series the Anselmo case was mentioned early on (first episode I think) and when it finally ground to a halt, they noted it was never solved
I think the real mystery is, who was paying all the other detective's and staff's salaries? City of Angels Detective Agency was set up to lose money (and they lost it great!) as a tax dodge. But when Maddie lost all her money, she didn't need (or even want) to lose that much money. Sure, she kept the staff on out of some misguided good will (and hand-waving show writing), but where did she get the money? (No work - and pay!)

I think the Anselmo case exemplifies how bad an agency they actually are (were?). They just milk the poor schlub who hired them in the first place, and never give results.

And then, when they decided they wanted to bring up a detective from the background, they had to bring in a new one. (detective Booger). Those poor actors playing the staff. They were little more than set decoration.
  #106  
Old 01-23-2017, 12:33 PM
delphica delphica is offline
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From your cite:



So he's on the loose again. We may have to start beaming those signals in to keep him from becoming violent. We lack a crucial piece of information. So the question is still unanswered -- What IS the frequency?
The other confusing gap between the original story and the "solution" is that two assailants were reported when the incident happened, but the solution puts forward one individual, who apparently is delusional. So was this person able to convince another person to be his accomplice?
  #107  
Old 01-23-2017, 12:39 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is offline
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
The Pederasty case? They caught the guy, but the punk got away.

No thanks to that Danger character...
+1
  #108  
Old 01-23-2017, 12:45 PM
MacLir MacLir is offline
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He sang for the king and queen. So who was the king then? I can't see the king and queen as Elvis and Joannie. Doesn't really work.
I apologize if this sets off a flame war among the true believers, but I think there is a different explanation:

Who is "American Pie" about, mostly? Buddy Holly…
Before Elvis, who was considered the "King of Rock and Roll"? Buddy Holly…

Now let's step through it.

♫When the Jester sang for the King and Queen,
In a coat he borrowed from James Dean♫
In his early appearances, Elvis looked very much like James Dean.

♫And a voice that came from you and me♫
Strong Southern hillbilly accent and less-than-stellar diction.

♫And while the King was looking down♫
Not facing the floor, but losing status due to his death

♫The Jester stole his thorny crown♫
Thereby becoming The King …

♫The courtroom was adjourned,
No verdict was returned.♫
And no one questioned the succession.

Then later in the song;

♫With the Jester on the sidelines, in a cast♫
At the time of the other events symbolized by the football game, Elvis was less active in actual music production, and was starring in movies - member of a cast.

Definitely not the only play on words in that song.
  #109  
Old 01-23-2017, 02:20 PM
Steve MB Steve MB is offline
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No mention of the Third Murderer from Ma-- er, The Scottish Play? Just a garden-variety continuity error, or a dropped plot thread?
  #110  
Old 01-23-2017, 05:26 PM
HubZilla HubZilla is offline
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Trying to stay away from plot holes, I wish I could hear a final word from the authors:

What happened at the end of Stephen King's "The Long Walk"?

In "1984", the Newspeak appendix refers to The Party in the past tense. Does this mean the Party gets overthrown, perhaps by the proles?
  #111  
Old 01-23-2017, 07:42 PM
janis_and_c0 janis_and_c0 is offline
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Re; American Pie: Many fans believe the King isn't a reference to the King of Rock and roll, but the king of folk, therefore, Pete Seger and Joan Baez were the king and queen. Plus, they were onstage with Dylan at Newport Folk Festival in 1963.

Makes sense to me.
  #112  
Old 01-24-2017, 09:59 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Originally Posted by Ethilrist View Post
What was Shepherd Book's past, and why did he know so much about the Operative?
This one was answered in the comic graphic novel The Shepherd's Tale (spoiler after the first paragraph) by Dark Horse in 2010.
  #113  
Old 01-24-2017, 10:10 AM
delphica delphica is offline
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This is an old one, but I have been thinking about it recently because my daughter is reading the books. Where did Mrs. Graymalkin get this chemistry set? Why is it magic? What was her son up to with it? Who made it? Is this like a retail thing? Or did someone buy a regular chemistry set and make it magic?
  #114  
Old 01-24-2017, 01:04 PM
Marine_One Marine_One is offline
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In The Time Machine (1960), what 3 books did George take when he went back to the future?
  #115  
Old 01-24-2017, 02:57 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Originally Posted by EinsteinsHund View Post
Just had a thought: while there are many interesting mysteries mentioned so far (though most fly over my head because you just can't know any cultural reference), they all come from novels, movies or songs, but not from classic mythology. But there must be also many examples in the Bible, Greek and Norse mythology and such, and by no means I am thinking of theological mysteries and subtleties (please let's not go into that in CS ), but of actually plot points or even plot holes that affect the story. Got any?
1. Why is Cupid often portrayed as a baby?
2. A nymph falls in love with Hermaphrodite and prays to Zeus for them to be together forever. Why does Zeus grant her wish?
3. What did Hermaphrodite look like after? One theory I read said He/she may have had two bodies. How would that even work?

Last edited by furryman; 01-24-2017 at 03:00 PM.
  #116  
Old 01-24-2017, 08:15 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by PAjoe View Post
Was the hill billy that they killed in Deliverance really one of the bad guys?
Solved. Yes.
  #117  
Old 01-24-2017, 08:33 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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In the novel version of The Hitch Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy there is a mystery set up where somebody bruises their upper arm. The person's identity is a mystery to be revealed later. Strangely enough, the question is never answered.

The radio and TV versions each had an answer. But given the major differences between the versions we can't trust that.
  #118  
Old 01-24-2017, 09:32 PM
DrForrester DrForrester is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
In the novel version of The Hitch Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy there is a mystery set up where somebody bruises their upper arm. The person's identity is a mystery to be revealed later. Strangely enough, the question is never answered.

The radio and TV versions each had an answer. But given the major differences between the versions we can't trust that.
I adore Douglas Adams for this mystery. His line about it is brilliant. The reader can just imagine his reassuring voice say that the identity of the person whose arm is bruised can safely remain a mystery because it is of no consequence whatsoever.

Thank You for mentioning this one!
  #119  
Old 01-25-2017, 05:41 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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More important is, what happened to Napoleon Dynamite's parents?
And Huey, Dewey and Louie's parents?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve MB View Post
No mention of the Third Murderer from Ma-- er, The Scottish Play? Just a garden-variety continuity error, or a dropped plot thread?
Likewise, what happened to the Fool from King Lear?

I suspect that in both cases the real answer is that the original actor playing the role was needed for a different role later in the play, but given the prominence of the Fool in Act I, his unremarked disappearance seems abrupt.
  #120  
Old 01-25-2017, 05:45 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
In the novel version of The Hitch Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy there is a mystery set up where somebody bruises their upper arm. The person's identity is a mystery to be revealed later. Strangely enough, the question is never answered.

The radio and TV versions each had an answer. But given the major differences between the versions we can't trust that.
Well, the radio show came first (even before the book) so if one needs a definitive answer it's "Arthur". But the revised, unresolved version is better.

One more I've just thought of: I want to know when the father in Fortunately, The Milk encountered the piranhas.
  #121  
Old 01-25-2017, 12:33 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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And Huey, Dewey and Louie's parents?


http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Della_Duck
  #122  
Old 01-25-2017, 04:31 PM
Don Draper Don Draper is offline
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Anyone remember "Dark Shadows"?

Just who was Victoria Winters and why was Elizabeth Collins-Stoddard so interested in her?
  #123  
Old 01-25-2017, 04:56 PM
GrandWino GrandWino is offline
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Was Tony Soprano killed when it all went to black?
  #124  
Old 01-25-2017, 07:21 PM
Bookkeeper Bookkeeper is offline
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I'd like to know particulars about Conan Doyle / Holmes's Giant Rat of Sumatra.
It's thoroughly explained (along with a lot of other stuff) in Fred Saberhagen's The Holmes-Dracula File.
  #125  
Old 01-26-2017, 06:54 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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It's thoroughly explained (along with a lot of other stuff) in Fred Saberhagen's The Holmes-Dracula File.
Not to mention in Richard L. Boyer's The Giant Rat of Sumatra. And the Firesign Theater's album of that name. Or a whole stack of other pastiches:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_Rat_of_Sumatra
  #126  
Old 01-27-2017, 01:02 PM
Patch Patch is offline
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Who killed the chauffeur in The Big Sleep?
  #127  
Old 01-27-2017, 01:18 PM
Velocity Velocity is offline
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I've been pondering the "Giant Rat of Sumatra" since I was 11 years old.
This.
  #128  
Old 01-27-2017, 01:42 PM
Miss Mapp Miss Mapp is offline
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Anyone remember "Dark Shadows"?

Just who was Victoria Winters and why was Elizabeth Collins-Stoddard so interested in her?
I've been rewatching the whole series since I got the big boxed set for Christmas and was wondering about that too. The question gets dropped even before Barnabas comes in and takes over the show.

Alexandra Moltke says in interviews that Vicky was meant to be Elizabeth's daughter, and I've seen that in semi-canonical follow-ups to the series, such as the audio plays surviving cast members did 10-15 years ago.

The last thing we ever see Vicky doing as far as finding her parents on the original show involved a portrait of a woman, painted about 25 year earlier, that looked very much like her. This woman is identified as Betty Hanscomb, the niece or daughter of the Collinwood butler back when there were lots of servants in the big house. That's as far as the mystery goes. Given the answer about Elizabeth being her mother, I have to wonder what all this business with Betty Hanscomb was about, and what Vicky was supposed to discover before this storyline was discarded.
  #129  
Old 01-28-2017, 01:21 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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I've been rewatching the whole series since I got the big boxed set for Christmas and was wondering about that too. The question gets dropped even before Barnabas comes in and takes over the show.

Alexandra Moltke says in interviews that Vicky was meant to be Elizabeth's daughter, and I've seen that in semi-canonical follow-ups to the series, such as the audio plays surviving cast members did 10-15 years ago.

The last thing we ever see Vicky doing as far as finding her parents on the original show involved a portrait of a woman, painted about 25 year earlier, that looked very much like her. This woman is identified as Betty Hanscomb, the niece or daughter of the Collinwood butler back when there were lots of servants in the big house. That's as far as the mystery goes. Given the answer about Elizabeth being her mother, I have to wonder what all this business with Betty Hanscomb was about, and what Vicky was supposed to discover before this storyline was discarded.
In one of the time travel stories one of the characters tells Victoria "Are you sure your not a Collins? You look like you might be related." That's as close as they get to actually addressing the mystery in the series.
  #130  
Old 01-28-2017, 06:09 PM
Sam Spayed PI Sam Spayed PI is offline
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Originally Posted by Patch View Post
Who killed the chauffeur in The Big Sleep?
This. And I'm shocked (shocked!) it took until the middle of page three for someone to think of it.

What I want to know is, if his baby needs him back so quickly that he needs to take an aeroplane (as opposed to a fast train), why did she write him a letter? Why didn't she call him on the phone?
  #131  
Old 01-29-2017, 07:01 PM
Enola Straight Enola Straight is offline
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Mickey is a mouse.
Donald is a duck.

WHAT IS GOOFY?

Don't tell me "a dog"...Pluto's already a dog.
  #132  
Old 01-30-2017, 05:43 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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What I want to know is, if his baby needs him back so quickly that he needs to take an aeroplane (as opposed to a fast train), why did she write him a letter? Why didn't she call him on the phone?
I wondered that, but always assumed the sense of urgency was his, not hers. She poured her heart out in a letter (perhaps to avoid the pain of immediate rejection) and he's keen to get back with her ASAP.
  #133  
Old 01-30-2017, 06:47 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Mickey is a mouse.
Donald is a duck.

WHAT IS GOOFY?

Don't tell me "a dog"...Pluto's already a dog.
I've always thought Goofy to be unique and sui generis -- the only member of his species.
  #134  
Old 01-30-2017, 06:52 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by Enola Straight View Post
Mickey is a mouse.
Donald is a duck.

WHAT IS GOOFY?

Don't tell me "a dog"...Pluto's already a dog.
As The Master has implied many times, you can't pre-empt the truth. Mrs. Howell really WAS named "Lovey", and Goofy really is a dog. He started out as "Dippy Dawg", and internal Disney documents describe him as a dog. Pluto predates him by two years, but apparently the folks at Disney wanted both a character that would be clearly a dog --owned by a mouse! -- and an anthropomorphic dog character who could be a companion to the same mouse. Take it up with them.
  #135  
Old 01-30-2017, 06:55 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Not to mention in Richard L. Boyer's The Giant Rat of Sumatra. And the Firesign Theater's album of that name. Or a whole stack of other pastiches:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_Rat_of_Sumatra
Thanks ! Have just followed the Wiki link: more stuff about Sumatran giant rats -- real-life (large rats, anyway); and fictional , developed from the Conan Doyle throwaway line -- than one would have imagined possible. The Wiki article even mentions the passing GR of S reference in Watership Down.
  #136  
Old 01-30-2017, 07:52 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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I've always thought Goofy to be unique and sui generis -- the only member of his species.
His son Max plays a prominent role in several shows. The Wikipedia page for Goofy lists several Goof relatives.

In addition, Goofy is sometimes shown hanging around with similar creatures.
  #137  
Old 01-30-2017, 09:21 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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As the Master Cecil asked early on, "Did the Corinthians ever write back?"
Just noticed this one. Brings to mind a long-ago-heard bit of World War 1 humour – part of the experience in that conflict, of British prisoners-of-war in Turkey. General impression got by such folk, was that the Turks were on the whole likeable people, and treated their POWs quite decently; but from a British point of view, they redefined “laid-back”. One POW had cause to call in at the post office in the Turkish town of Tarsus (where St. Paul came from, way before there was such a place as Turkey). He described the pile-up there of undelivered mail; as so huge that he half expected to find therein, a reply to Paul from the Corinthians.

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Originally Posted by Sangahyando View Post
I've always thought Goofy to be unique and sui generis -- the only member of his species.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg View Post
His son Max plays a prominent role in several shows. The Wikipedia page for Goofy lists several Goof relatives.

In addition, Goofy is sometimes shown hanging around with similar creatures.
Thanks. "Shows what I knew !" The Wiki article contains various oddities re Disney cartoon characters, including how for a while, a romance was hinted at between Horace Horsecollar and Clarabelle Cow; after which, suggestions of Clarabelle and Goofy pairing-off. Well -- anthropomorphic-animals-fantasy-land has been "since forever", a place where normal Earth-type sexual / reproductive biology doesn't apply: frogs and mice, owls and pussycats, etc...
  #138  
Old 02-01-2017, 06:15 AM
Sam Spayed PI Sam Spayed PI is offline
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I wondered that, but always assumed the sense of urgency was his, not hers.
Oh. That's pathetic.
  #139  
Old 02-01-2017, 03:48 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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I wondered that, but always assumed the sense of urgency was his, not hers. She poured her heart out in a letter (perhaps to avoid the pain of immediate rejection) and he's keen to get back with her ASAP.
Well, she wrote me a letter, said she couldn't live without me no more...

So your position is that he's paraphrasing, rather than accurately reporting the contents of the letter?
  #140  
Old 02-01-2017, 06:42 PM
gkster gkster is offline
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what happened to the Fool from King Lear?

I suspect that in both cases the real answer is that the original actor playing the role was needed for a different role later in the play, but given the prominence of the Fool in Act I, his unremarked disappearance seems abrupt.
The Fool himself says in his last appearance "I'll go to bed at noon" (III.6.83) which some take as his announcing his death--kind of an oblique way to do it, though.
Lear says ‘And my poor fool is hanged.’ (5. 3. 304), but is that a reference to the Fool or to Cordelia? Or both?
This article speculates that the same actor played both roles, the Fool and Cordelia; it's possible since the 2 never appear on stage together.
http://www.britaininprint.net/study_...fool_lear.html

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Did Lady Macbeth have children?
Yes, she had at least one child. She says "I have given suck, and know / How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me" (I.7.55-6) So at some time in the past she did give birth to a child who she breastfed. (There are some women able to lactate without being pregnant or giving birth, but it's not at all likely that she would have done this, especially since we're talking about the 1600s and earlier)
The mystery is, what happened to Lady Macbeth's child? Did it die? Was it the child of a previous marriage? Fassbender's 2015 film answers the question by showing the Macbeths at a funeral for their child.

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(C. N. Parkinson notwithstanding) did Horatio Hornblower push Captain Sawyer down the ladder? (Well of course he did!)
Why "of course"? The last time I read Parkinson was in 1980, and I do remember him saying that Hornblower did push Sawyer, which doesn't ring true to me at all. I see multiple indications that Wellard did the pushing and Hornblower is covering up for him.


As for mysteries, does anyone have answers to these Narnia ones?

What is the "Unspeakable word" spoken by Jadis when she destroys Charn?

What wrongdoing did Coriakin commit that had him banished to the Duffers' island?

What is the story that Lucy reads in Coriakin's spellbook, "for the refreshment of the spirit", the loveliest story she ever read?
  #141  
Old 02-01-2017, 09:06 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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I'll say 'what did Bill Murray's character whisper to Scarlett Johannson's in Lost in Translation, because the auteur (Sofia Coppola) probably really did have something other than a joke-on-the-audience in mind. (Which is why I won't say 'what was in the briefcase in Pulp Fiction' because it would certainly have been a joke of some kind.)
Solved
  #142  
Old 02-02-2017, 12:16 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by gkster View Post
As for mysteries, does anyone have answers to these Narnia ones?

What is the "Unspeakable word" spoken by Jadis when she destroys Charn?

What wrongdoing did Coriakin commit that had him banished to the Duffers' island?

What is the story that Lucy reads in Coriakin's spellbook, "for the refreshment of the spirit", the loveliest story she ever read?


All good ones, much better than that dreadful Susan one, which is so easily answered by any fan.
  #143  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:37 PM
gkster gkster is offline
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DrDeth, by "that dreadful Susan one" do you mean why is Susan no longer a friend of Narnia?
  #144  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:26 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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DrDeth, by "that dreadful Susan one" do you mean why is Susan no longer a friend of Narnia?
Yes, but of course she is. Just not for the nonce.

"Once a King or Queen of Narnia, always a King or Queen of Narnia.'

It is shown many old people cam back to the fold.

Susan is just going thru a phase.
  #145  
Old 02-07-2017, 03:01 PM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
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The mystery is, what happened to Lady Macbeth's child? Did it die? Was it the child of a previous marriage? Fassbender's 2015 film answers the question by showing the Macbeths at a funeral for their child.
Historically, Lady MacBeth had a son with her first husband, Gille Coemgáin. His name was Lulach, and he succeeded MacBeth as King of the Scots. He was a weak monarch, and was usurped and killed only a few months later by Malcolm, Duncan's son. Shakespeare apparently didn't find his reign (or even his existence, beyond the mention of his being suckled) worth mentioning.

Last edited by MrAtoz; 02-07-2017 at 03:03 PM.
  #146  
Old 02-07-2017, 03:40 PM
Ignotus Ignotus is offline
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What did the narrator see at the bottom of the well in Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum?
  #147  
Old 02-08-2017, 06:16 AM
eclectic wench eclectic wench is offline
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Originally Posted by MrAtoz View Post
Historically, Lady MacBeth had a son with her first husband, Gille Coemgáin. His name was Lulach, and he succeeded MacBeth as King of the Scots. He was a weak monarch, and was usurped and killed only a few months later by Malcolm, Duncan's son. Shakespeare apparently didn't find his reign (or even his existence, beyond the mention of his being suckled) worth mentioning.
I think Shakespeare implies pretty clearly that the fictional Lady M's child is dead. It's not explicit, but the child is never mentioned except for that one time - there's no 'We're doing this for the kiddies, darling' or 'Little M and his descendants will reign for centuries' or 'Well, at least if I get killed Little M will be around to take over' or 'Shit, we need to get Little M to safety/at least Little M is safe with your cousins' or anything else that you'd expect, in a play that's so bound up with questions of succession and blood, if either of them had a child who could be expected to succeed them. The only thing along those lines is his 'Bring forth men children only; for thy undaunted mettle should compose nothing but males' - it's about their future children, not about existing ones. There are even two other children in the play (Banquo's son Fleance, and Macduff's son), which isn't common in Shakespeare and isn't really necessary to the plot - their presence is an extra highlight of Lady M's child's absence.

From an actor's or director's point of view, I think it can be a really strong choice either to play it like the child was both of theirs, or like the child was hers from a previous marriage. That one mention of the child ('I have given suck' etc) is clearly her ultimate weapon, the nuclear option she brings out in extremis to force him into the murder. So depending on how she plays it, either she's saying (among all the other layers of meaning) 'Another man gave me a child. You haven't been man enough to do that. Man the fuck up and kill this guy - this murder will be our equivalent of a shared child, the thing we create together' or else she's saying 'You know the most vital and emotionally powerful thing you and I have ever done together? The worst pain we've ever been through together? Yeah, fuck that. This murder is more important to me.'

And in Lear, I like to think the Fool vanishes because Robert Armin was double-jobbing and had to do a quick change after Act III and leg it across to the Swan Theatre for his other gig.
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