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  #51  
Old 02-19-2017, 02:49 AM
NDP NDP is offline
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Originally Posted by Amateur Barbarian View Post
Blueberries. Never had one that didn't taste a little bland and chalky. I think they're only good when cooked into jam or pie filling, and even then I find it underwhelming compared to other fruits.
You're not the first one I've heard who's made this complaint about blueberries but I've noticed it seems only to apply to blueberries in the Northeast US. Not to brag but the blueberries grown in the Pacific Northwest taste pretty sweet even when eaten raw. Must be a different variety.
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  #52  
Old 02-19-2017, 08:07 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
Roasted chestnuts. The famous song makes them sound so enticing but don't fall for it because it's a trap! I am not a picky eater in the least and I love nuts but roasted chestnuts are nasty as hell. The vile taste and texture are hard to describe but they are like vaguely spoiled, spongy, mealy, semi-sweet hunks of unidentifiable purification. They could have literally picked almost any other type of nut and it would have work out infinitely better - walnuts, pistachios, pecans etc. Those are all excellent but not so with chestnuts.
The best use I've found for roasted chestnuts is a cream soup using them along with wild rice. We serve it once a year around xmas, and people are always amazed.

It's a difficult soup to make (scoring, roasting, peeling the chestnuts) but worth the effort.
  #53  
Old 02-19-2017, 08:24 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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The best use I've found for roasted chestnuts is a cream soup using them along with wild rice. We serve it once a year around xmas, and people are always amazed.

It's a difficult soup to make (scoring, roasting, peeling the chestnuts) but worth the effort.
Ooo.. that actually sounds really tasty. I'll have to remember that next winter when the chestnuts show up at the grocery and give it a try,
  #54  
Old 02-19-2017, 08:34 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
The Kosher dogs my dad used to buy in the American Midwest (primarily from Chicago) came from a different universe than the all-beef franks I get here in Toronto. (I suppose I could try a Halal butcher and see if I can find anything like them. I have yet to see Kosher meat offered anywhere near where I live.)
Canada doesn't have Hebrew National?


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I lived in Russia full-time from 1992 to 2008. I can recall only one instance where I was offered caviar in someone's kitchen, and that was because (a) the couple was rich (we're talking BUCKETS of fresh black caviar) and (b) I was giving the wife English lessons. Nowadays, the average Russian can barely afford a tin of the stuff to enjoy at New Year's, and supermarkets keep their selection under lock and key. I go back to Russia at least twice a year, and have noticed that ersatz caviar made from kelp is now on sale in a lot of stores. (Not bad stuff, either.)
Like I said, I lived in the Soviet Union. It was a different place.
Quote:
Neither do I, though my local supermarket (in Moscow) always has a bewildering variety of bread on sale.
I remember the food generally being terrible in Russia (I once was served a bowl of chicken soup with a feather in it), but the bread was amazing.

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Originally Posted by NDP View Post
You're not the first one I've heard who's made this complaint about blueberries but I've noticed it seems only to apply to blueberries in the Northeast US. Not to brag but the blueberries grown in the Pacific Northwest taste pretty sweet even when eaten raw. Must be a different variety.
In S. Indiana, we had neighbors who had blueberry bushes in their backyard. They had a high yield, and the neighbors used to invite people to come and pick blueberries, because they had more than enough for themselves. They were delicious. It's probably just another garden vs. store thing. In New England, they are very proud of their blueberries, so they cultivate them, and they are better there-- there are several varieties. My mother lives in Maine, and overnights me fresh blueberries a couple of times a year, in addition to sending blueberry jams and other things. They are fantastic. But year, fresh blueberries from the store in Indiana are like eating slightly sweet packing peanuts. When I bake blueberry muffins, I use frozen. There is a brand that is way better than the fresh ones. My mother also sends me dried Maine blueberries for my Hamantashen.

Last edited by RivkahChaya; 02-19-2017 at 08:35 AM.
  #55  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:16 AM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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I'm sure a lot of people think Scotch tastes sublime. But I can't get over the word association that it should taste like butterscotch. It don't.
You might enjoy the below stuff, which has recently come on the market in the UK. I'm finding it rather nice.

www.toffoc.com
  #56  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:24 AM
bibliophage bibliophage is offline
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I ordered a blue-cheese stuffed burger once. I love burgers and I love blue cheese, so I expected to like it. Unfortunately the flavors seem to clash instead of complementing each other. It wasn't inedible but I would rather have had a regular cheeseburger.
  #57  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:38 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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I have learned that I should order blue cheese in upscale restaurants only. Blue cheese is one of those things you should never buy on the cheap. Huge quality difference between cheap blue cheese and expensive blue cheese. I'm going to guess that restaurants that serve hamburgers aren't the place to go for really good blue cheese.
  #58  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:42 AM
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I get a "black and blue burger" at a local restaurant that is delicious. Home made blue cheese dressing on the bottom bun and crumbled Maytag on top of the meat. Mmmmmmmmm
  #59  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:53 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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The best use I've found for roasted chestnuts is a cream soup using them along with wild rice. We serve it once a year around xmas, and people are always amazed.

It's a difficult soup to make (scoring, roasting, peeling the chestnuts) but worth the effort.
I have a tin of chestnut puree (made in France, I think). Can I use that instead of chestnuts out of the bag?
  #60  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:58 AM
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I came THIS CLOSE to pitting prosciutto.
  #61  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:06 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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I get a "black and blue burger" at a local restaurant that is delicious. Home made blue cheese dressing on the bottom bun and crumbled Maytag on top of the meat. Mmmmmmmmm
Yeah, we have a few places around here that offer a "black and blue." My favorite one is from a pub where they make it with Stilton, roasted garlic, german mustard, a black pepper-crusted patty, and serve it on a pumpernickel bun (although now they've changed the name to "Stilton burger.") Another place I like does cajun spices and blue cheese topping and dressing (similar to yours.) Not sure of the blue cheese they use there, but it's just as fantastic.

I think blue cheese & beef pair fantastically and blue cheese really brings out the beefiness of a burger and gives a nice funky umami edge to it, but it certainly can be overdone and overpower. Christ, it's 10 a.m. and all I want is a blue cheeseburger.
  #62  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:07 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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Canada doesn't have Hebrew National?
Not that I've observed. I live in a heavily Muslim part of the GTA (Scarborough), so there are lots of Halal stores around. I would buy Hebrew National if I could find it.

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Like I said, I lived in the Soviet Union. It was a different place.
I remember the food generally being terrible in Russia (I once was served a bowl of chicken soup with a feather in it), but the bread was amazing.
I was there as a tourist in 1975, and again for graduate school in 1989--90. There was absolutely nothing special about the food in low-budget hotels or my institute, but restaurants like the Uzbekistan in Moscow were always good. There was a little pizzaria not far from my dorm where I would still happily eat today.
  #63  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:34 AM
quiltguy quiltguy is offline
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-Chestnut puree in a can is good for making pastries, but little else. A rather toothsome French pastry, called a MONT BLANC, uses it to good advantage.

-Fresh, whole chestnuts are imported, usually from Italy, but by the time they make the trip over, mold can set in. If you ever buy them, dump them in a bowl of water, whichever ones float, discard, they're the bad ones. Due to the Chestnut Blight of last century, American chestnuts were wiped out, and unfortunately, they were quite sweet and tasty. The imports cannot compare.

-Please, please, please, the upthreader who prepared HORSE chestnuts, do not do that ever again. They can be toxic. Yes, yes, they are used in some herbal preparations(for varicose veins), but as for food, ixnay. Keep one in your pocket to avoid arthritis or rheumatism(old wives' tale)

Major olive avoider here,man oh man, just looking at those things gives me the heebie-jeebies, they're just little salt bombs. If ambrosia had not been the food of the Greek gods, I'm sure olive oil would've been on the list of runners-up.
  #64  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:41 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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-Please, please, please, the upthreader who prepared HORSE chestnuts, do not do that ever again. They can be toxic. Yes, yes, they are used in some herbal preparations(for varicose veins), but as for food, ixnay.
I know that now, yes. At the time, I had no idea some chestnuts are not edible.
  #65  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:48 AM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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You're not the first one I've heard who's made this complaint about blueberries but I've noticed it seems only to apply to blueberries in the Northeast US. Not to brag but the blueberries grown in the Pacific Northwest taste pretty sweet even when eaten raw. Must be a different variety.
I'd love to try some blueberries from the Pacific Northwest because I agree that I don't see the appeal of them. I know people that love them. I can eat them, but I don't see what's special about them.
  #66  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:49 AM
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Pasta. The sauce cooking makes some pretty good smells, but put it on top of a plate full of bland noodly noodles... yuck. Noodles should always be used in moderation. They're not a dish in and of themselves, no matter what sauce you pour on top to pretend they have actual flavor.
The trick is to give the sauce a chance to coat the pasta and penetrate it prior to serving. It's best to add some sauce to the pasta right in the pot (after draining it) and then serve it with more sauce on the side, added to taste.

Always boil the pasta in salted water, and do not rinse the starch off it when it's done cooking. Small portions of the cooking water can be added to the dish if it's too thick for your taste.
  #67  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:57 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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Must be opposite day. I love olives, black ones, green ones, stuffed ones - but I cannot abide the taste of olive oil.
You're aware that olive oil comes in a wide variety of flavors, depending on the soil and climate where the olives are grown? You should never, ever buy any grade other than extra virgin, first cold pressing. I love sopping up olive oil with bread or pizza crust, straight out of the bottle, or heating it in a little pot with some butter, garlic, and anchovies first.
  #68  
Old 02-19-2017, 12:16 PM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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Canada doesn't have Hebrew National. Best tasting kosher dogs were made by J.W. Kwinter, but they're out of business. I think President's Choice Ball Park tried to copy them. Nathan's are okay.

Anyway, lots of foods don't live up to their reputation.

Just my opinion, of course, but:

- Yorkshire puddings are delicious (Mom's homemade)-- and so often are really terrible when eaten at restaurants or buffets.

- Clam chowder? Yum. Oyster crackers -- no taste, no thanks.

- Mushrooms. Lots of types, some better than others, but not worth big bucks to me. Worst if described on the menu as "foraged".

- Truffle oil. Meh.

- Fancy melons.

- Fugu, abalone... More otoro, arigato.

- Birds nest soup

- XO sauce

- flavoured foams or unsugared cotton candy

- "deconstructed" foods -- like my food constructed

Last edited by Dr_Paprika; 02-19-2017 at 12:18 PM.
  #69  
Old 02-19-2017, 12:36 PM
eschereal eschereal is online now
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And scotch. I see people enjoying it, so I need someone to give me a lesson there - it is one drink I cannot stand - tastes and smells like something used for cleaning machinery.
It takes effort. You have to get to the third sipping glass, where it starts to taste much better. I recommend a straight scotch from the southwest, called Oban, which has a lovely buttery note to it.
  #70  
Old 02-19-2017, 01:23 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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I came THIS CLOSE to pitting prosciutto.
Good prosciutto has its place. On top of ripe melon. On top of a sauteed chicken cutlet and under a blanket of grated Parm and slipped into a hot oven long enough for the cheese to melt and the prosciutto to get slightly crispy.

On an Italian hero, no. The prosciutto resists your incisors and comes stringing out of the sandwich, leaving the cappicola and Genoa salami and the provolone behind. And then it gets stuck between your molars.
  #71  
Old 02-19-2017, 02:28 PM
eschereal eschereal is online now
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I'd love to try some blueberries from the Pacific Northwest because I agree that I don't see the appeal of them. I know people that love them. I can eat them, but I don't see what's special about them.
Huckleberries. From the Gifford-Pinchot, picked of the bush on a hot and dusty August afternoon. PNW blueberries a just a ball of wet sugar.
  #72  
Old 02-19-2017, 02:30 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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There shouldn't be any qualitative difference between kosher and non-kosher hot dogs. "Kosher" just means that the animals were slaughtered in a particular way.
I know, but there IS a difference. I don't know why, but non-kosher beef dogs just aren't the same.

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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
I have yet to see Kosher meat offered anywhere near where I live.)
Here, I have to drive a few miles to find a place that sells NON-kosher meat.


And then there's supermarket gefilte fish in jars. It tastes NOTHING like authentic gefilte fish. It has no flavor or texture, and it's ground, not chopped.
  #73  
Old 02-19-2017, 03:20 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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I'd love to try some blueberries from the Pacific Northwest because I agree that I don't see the appeal of them. I know people that love them. I can eat them, but I don't see what's special about them.
I love blueberries because of how easily they freeze. I made blueberry waffles for breakfast yesterday from last year's harvest and couldn't tell them from freshly picked.
  #74  
Old 02-19-2017, 07:01 PM
stillownedbysetters stillownedbysetters is offline
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I can't warm up to gin or scotch. Gin smells lovely, but tastes so medicinal. Scotch just tastes bad. Even the really good stuff which I have been fortunate enough to try.

I was terribly disappointed with caviar. Salted snot. Ugh.

However, all of you olive haters can send them all to me. I have never encountered a variety of olive that I didn't love. Same with mushrooms.

Peppery greens look pretty in a salad and should taste green and fresh, not bitter and peppery. I am always disappointed when these appear in my salad.
  #75  
Old 02-19-2017, 07:13 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Good prosciutto has its place. On top of ripe melon. On top of a sauteed chicken cutlet and under a blanket of grated Parm and slipped into a hot oven long enough for the cheese to melt and the prosciutto to get slightly crispy.

On an Italian hero, no. The prosciutto resists your incisors and comes stringing out of the sandwich, leaving the cappicola and Genoa salami and the provolone behind. And then it gets stuck between your molars.
I agree on the sandwiches. It's also too delicate a delight, I think, to waste on a sandwich buried beneath all that. (Although maybe it'll work on a very simple sandwich, not buried under spicy meats like cappicola and salami). I have a friend from Naples who buys prosciutto by the whole legs and eats it throughout the year, after slicing it thinly on his deli slicer. Whenever I go to his house, it's one of his standard finger foods: just a plate of prosciutto, and some fresh baked bread and olive oil, along with a glass of wine. The stuff is just so divine and buttery soft. Melts in your mouth with a beautiful, almost parmesan-like nutty flavor to it. One of life's simple treats.
  #76  
Old 02-19-2017, 07:26 PM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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One time I had some granola and some chocolate milk, so I thought: how couldn't that be great? Oats, raisins, almonds, chocolate, milk? Yum!

Gag.
  #77  
Old 02-19-2017, 07:57 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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"...just a plate of prosciutto, and some fresh baked bread and olive oil, along with a glass of wine. The stuff is just so divine and buttery soft. Melts in your mouth with a beautiful, almost parmesan-like nutty flavor to it. One of life's simple treats."

There you go -- BEST way to enjoy prosciutto. Or Spanish Serrano ham. Or the version they make in Germany...Westphalian?

Blueberry haters: try picking your own in a sunny field in rural Maine in late July. Just don't let the bears get your baby.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueberries_for_Sal
  #78  
Old 02-19-2017, 08:35 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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There you go -- BEST way to enjoy prosciutto. Or Spanish Serrano ham. Or the version they make in Germany...Westphalian?
Yes, I certainly love the prosciutto which has a monopoly on the legitimate use of force in a defined geographic region. That is some politically stable lunchmeat all ready to encourage the growth of complex, technological societies based on the rule of law.
  #79  
Old 02-19-2017, 08:45 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Consider me whooshed.
  #80  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:14 PM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is offline
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Blueberry haters: try picking your own in a sunny field in rural Maine in late July.
Sorry. We have family in Maine who have given us fresh picked bags... of slightly chalky, rather bland berries they thought were divine.

Blueberries aren't bad. Just not that good, either.
  #81  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:29 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Consider me whooshed.
Yeah, you got me. I think maybe it has something to do with geographic protectionism of the name prosciutto, but that refers to specific prosciuttos, like Prosciutto di Parma, or Prosciutto Toscano, etc. The name "prosciutto," on its own, can be used by others, as far as I know. One of my favorites, La Quercia's Prosciutto Americano, is made right here in America, in Iowa.
  #82  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:33 PM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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I love blueberries because of how easily they freeze. I made blueberry waffles for breakfast yesterday from last year's harvest and couldn't tell them from freshly picked.
My daughter loves them frozen. She will just freeze them and eat them.
  #83  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:46 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Yeah, you got me. I think maybe it has something to do with geographic protectionism of the name prosciutto, but that refers to specific prosciuttos, like Prosciutto di Parma, or Prosciutto Toscano, etc. The name "prosciutto," on its own, can be used by others, as far as I know. One of my favorites, La Quercia's Prosciutto Americano, is made right here in America, in Iowa.
Ohhhhh, yes....La Quercia makes amazing stuff! Try their speck, if you haven't already.

Derleth, come back, you are too subtle for us. Are you calling out Big Prosciutto?
  #84  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:49 PM
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is online now
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Pasta. The sauce cooking makes some pretty good smells, but put it on top of a plate full of bland noodly noodles... yuck. Noodles should always be used in moderation. They're not a dish in and of themselves, no matter what sauce you pour on top to pretend they have actual flavor.
  #85  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:45 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Ohhhhh, yes....La Quercia makes amazing stuff! Try their speck, if you haven't already.
Oh, I have! And the prosciutto piccante, the lomo, the pancetta. For some reason, I want to say that I tried the acorn edition prosciutto, but I'm now doubting my memory. Yeah, I know, it should be something seared into my brain if I did. I'll have to ask my brother, because if I did, he would have been involved, and his memory is better than mine these days.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-19-2017 at 10:46 PM.
  #86  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:53 PM
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Actually, I'll side with Shagnasty on this. Roasted chestnuts smell like they should be the greatest thing in the world but they end up tasting like, as you described it, slightly sweeter (and vaguely nutty) baked potatoes. Not my thing at all. I've eaten them at the Christmas markets in Europe (mostly Budapest) where they are ubiquitous, so it's not the quality of chestnuts that's the problem. They're just bland. I'm not sure I've ever gotten ones that match Shagnasty's description, but I just didn't get their appeal. Of course, I'm also not a fan of baked potatoes, so maybe that has something to do with it. And every year I would try them again, enticed by the smell, and every year I wonder why I bothered.
I love chestnuts. The flavor is subtle, but delicious. Mildly sweet without being cloying.

Baked potatoes are bland. Chestnuts are sublime.
  #87  
Old 02-20-2017, 12:08 AM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Chocolate-dipped fruit - like Shari's berries. Blech! They certainly look enticing, but so cloyingly sweet - two great tastes that DONT taste great together.<snip>
I agree with you if the chocolate is milk chocolate - fruit is best with darker chocolate, so the bitterness of the chocolate and the sweetness of the fruit play off of each other.

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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Huckleberries. From the Gifford-Pinchot, picked of the bush on a hot and dusty August afternoon. PNW blueberries a just a ball of wet sugar.
They're not nearly as commercially available as blueberries, but saskatoon berries (aka seriviceberries or a bunch of other names) are far tastier. I have learned that not everyone eats saskatoon berries, though - they are only grown as ornamental shrubs in some places. That is a true shame, since the berries are so tasty.

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Originally Posted by stillownedbysetters View Post
I can't warm up to gin or scotch. Gin smells lovely, but tastes so medicinal. <snip>
I thought gin was one step removed from rubbing alcohol until I met Bombay Sapphire. That gin gave me an insight into why anyone would drink gin willingly.

My "food" would be wine. I like the occasional zinfandel, but I have tried very few wines that I would bother with, white or red.
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  #88  
Old 02-20-2017, 12:41 AM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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Chocolate covered pretzels are the middling contamination of two great snacks.
  #89  
Old 02-21-2017, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Ohhhhh, yes....La Quercia makes amazing stuff! Try their speck, if you haven't already.

Derleth, come back, you are too subtle for us. Are you calling out Big Prosciutto?
I think this is the gag: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westphalian_sovereignty

I go through a lot of frozen pizzas (I work a weird schedule, and hate cooking for just myself) and there's a particular 'meatball marinara' one that I just can't stand. I like that brand's meatballs with a different sauce, I like that sauce with different toppings, but that particular combination is just blech.
  #90  
Old 02-21-2017, 07:20 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Yes, that's it.
  #91  
Old 02-21-2017, 10:47 AM
TRC4941 TRC4941 is offline
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Red Delicious apples! They look exactly what their name implies - red and delicious BUT they have to be the blandest apples grown.

Last edited by TRC4941; 02-21-2017 at 10:47 AM.
  #92  
Old 02-21-2017, 12:41 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
Foie gras (fattened goose liver) is sometimes tolerable but usually tastes like licking a newborn baby's diaper.


You're not getting good/properly prepared foie gras then. Seasoned and seared with a bit of an acidic fruit compote or some such with some toast points, or a nice torchon with dried apricots served on brioche...it's EVILLY good.
  #93  
Old 02-21-2017, 02:58 PM
snowthx snowthx is offline
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Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
Red Delicious apples! They look exactly what their name implies - red and delicious BUT they have to be the blandest apples grown.
Seconded. Altho if you have had one right off the tree you would swear it is not the same apple as the mealy mess they sell at the grocer. That's probably the same for all store-bought apples, tho.
  #94  
Old 02-21-2017, 03:53 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
Red Delicious apples! They look exactly what their name implies - red and delicious BUT they have to be the blandest apples grown.
Buy only the good ones! The name Red Delicious describes a family of apples. Some are great, many are lousy. Look for firm ones that are not completely red. Maybe even an orange-red streak appearance.

Like with many popular things (e.g., some breeds of dogs), the growers went hog wild planting trees without any concern over quality. Combined with crappy long term storage systems they've nearly ruined the whole category. But there are really good ones out there.

I know I'm going to take heat for this one, but ... I like chocolate. I like raisins. But chocolate covered raisins are the food from Hades. How could these two things taste so awful together? And why do people buy them?????
  #95  
Old 02-21-2017, 05:20 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigmagirl View Post
One time I had some granola and some chocolate milk, so I thought: how couldn't that be great? Oats, raisins, almonds, chocolate, milk? Yum!

Gag.
I've got a hiking book here with a recipe for emergency rations, useful for storing and carrying when you get called out for a search party. Chocolate and Oats. It says (and I do not quote exactly),

"At first it won't appeal to everyone. But after a couple of days, it won't appeal to anyone"
  #96  
Old 02-22-2017, 07:41 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
Vanilla Extract is not good to drink, as my 4 year old self learned, to my rue & regret.
When I was four I climbed up into the cupboard and found mom's stash of Hershey's baking chocolate. I couldn't read but I knew what a flat package with silver letters on brown meant.

Not good.
  #97  
Old 02-22-2017, 07:54 AM
Cardigan Cardigan is online now
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Stuff made by Hostess looks like they should be tasty pastries, but bleah!

Sno Balls https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sno_Balls
Sing Dongs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ding_Dong
Ho Hos https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ho_Hos
Cupcakes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hostess_CupCake
  #98  
Old 02-22-2017, 08:50 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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Originally Posted by NeonMadman View Post
For me, it's coffee. That stuff smells just wonderful when it's brewing, but let any of it get into my mouth, and I'll spew it out in a heartbeat. I can't even stand anything that vaguely tastes like coffee; coffee ice cream, for example.
I love the way coffee looks, particularly with cream added. Such a pretty color.
I love the way coffee is so nice and warm. Wrapping your hands around a cup is heaven.
I love the way coffee makes me feel, so energized.
I love the way coffee smells. Like being alive.

But coffee tastes like shit. Why do you think people add so many different things to it?
  #99  
Old 02-22-2017, 08:55 AM
phantom lamb phantom lamb is offline
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Candy apples and caramel apples. I am pretty much convinced that the entire appeal is only visual, I refuse to believe someone eats those for the taste alone.
  #100  
Old 02-22-2017, 11:04 AM
Catamount Catamount is offline
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I like watermelon-flavored candy (especially Jolly Ranchers) but I haaaaaaaaaate real watermelon. Any melons, actually. They all taste like dirty water to me.
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