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  #51  
Old 03-08-2017, 10:49 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Incidentally, the instrument in "Good Vibrations" isn't a standard theremin, which is played with no physical contact at all with the instrument. It's something called an electro-theremin, or Tannerin, and is played by moving a slide across across a rod with the right hand, and using the left hand on a knob to control volume.

Here's a video of a tannerin.

Compare with theremin.

Similar sounding instruments, significantly different manner of playing.

Last edited by pulykamell; 03-08-2017 at 10:50 AM.
  #52  
Old 03-08-2017, 10:51 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Originally Posted by Les Espaces Du Sommeil View Post
There's the whole "cello metal" genre. Apocalyptica is probably the most famous band in that style. They started out playing surprisingly convincing Metallica covers. Their first album Plays Metallica by Four Cellos can be found on youtube.

There's also 2CELLOS who specialize in pop-rock covers like Smooth Criminal or Thunderstruck.
I thought earlier of the cellos in the Drifters 1959 hit "There Goes My Baby".
  #53  
Old 03-08-2017, 10:59 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Electric Light Orchestra used violins and cellos quite a bit, but Livin' Thing is one of their songs in which Mik Kaminski's violin has more of a leading part, including solos at the beginning and after the first chorus.
  #54  
Old 03-08-2017, 11:00 AM
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Ok, not a solo per se, but along the lines of unconventional instrumentation, in the riff for Tears of a Clown there's a bassoon going at it and it keeps time throughout the rest of the song. BTW what a great bass line! Great song.

Last edited by mack; 03-08-2017 at 11:03 AM.
  #55  
Old 03-08-2017, 11:02 AM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
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I'm a little surprised no one's mentioned the Beatles so far—solos like the piccolo trumpet solo in "Penny Lane," the penny whistle solo in "Fool on the Hill," the sax solo in "Lady Madonna"...

Saxophone solos aren't really that unusual per se, but they are for the Beatles. If the OP's really interested, I'm sure we could come up with many more examples of sax solos.
  #56  
Old 03-08-2017, 11:28 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
I'm a little surprised no one's mentioned the Beatles so far—solos like the piccolo trumpet solo in "Penny Lane," the penny whistle solo in "Fool on the Hill," the sax solo in "Lady Madonna"...

Saxophone solos aren't really that unusual per se, but they are for the Beatles. If the OP's really interested, I'm sure we could come up with many more examples of sax solos.
It seemed to me like the 80s were FULL of sax solos on pop/rock songs.

Or we can go to punk saxophone! (X-Ray Spex--sax starts at 1:20.)

Live version of "Bondage Up Yours!"

Last edited by pulykamell; 03-08-2017 at 11:29 AM.
  #57  
Old 03-08-2017, 11:52 AM
Ají de Gallina Ají de Gallina is offline
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There are a couple of bassoon solos in "Live at the Quick" by Béla Fleck and the Flecktones and also a call-and-response between tabla and electric banjo.
  #58  
Old 03-08-2017, 12:22 PM
xizor xizor is offline
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The Kongos, Come With Me Now has an accordion solo.

Also, the mandolin solo in Rod Stewart's Maggie May is pretty famous.
  #59  
Old 03-08-2017, 12:35 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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"Clair" by Gilbert O'Sullivan has two odd solos. It starts with a human whistling, then there is a harmonnica bridge.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sU9fClvdo5s
  #60  
Old 03-08-2017, 12:50 PM
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There's a nice banjo solo in The Who's "Squeeze Box"
  #61  
Old 03-08-2017, 12:53 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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While not a solo, The Hooters' "And We Danced" starts out with a duet of two atypical rock instruments: a mandolin and a melodica. (The band's name itself comes from a nickname for the melodica.)
  #62  
Old 03-08-2017, 01:02 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Piccolo trumpet is used in several songs, including "Penny Lane" and in Barry Manilow's "I Write the Songs".
  #63  
Old 03-08-2017, 01:04 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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The Association's recorder solo in Windy. Rock on, bro!

The bassoon riff in the Harper's Bazaar cover of the 59th Street Bridge Song.

And when you're good, all you need is a cowbell.
  #64  
Old 03-08-2017, 02:16 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by JKellyMap View Post
The kazoo in the Rolling Stones' "Something Happened to me Yesterday."
(Some claim it's some other instrument, but if so, it's certainly meant to sound like a kazoo.)
Bzzzt. It sounds exactly like a trumpet, because it is.
  #65  
Old 03-08-2017, 02:57 PM
zimaane zimaane is offline
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Led Zeppelin's Whole Lotta Love has a theremin bit in the free form middle section.
  #66  
Old 03-08-2017, 05:13 PM
jerseymule jerseymule is offline
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Minor Waltz, by the Asylum Street Spankers has a saw solo.
  #67  
Old 03-08-2017, 05:51 PM
Dante G Dante G is offline
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Great choices everyone. Thanks! I'll take a listen to these as I get the time.
  #68  
Old 03-08-2017, 11:25 PM
4d3fect 4d3fect is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
It seemed to me like the 80s were FULL of sax solos on pop/rock songs.

Or we can go to punk saxophone! (X-Ray Spex--sax starts at 1:20.)

Live version of "Bondage Up Yours!"
Also, hard to forget "New York's All Right If You Like Saxophones"

(start at 2:19 unless you REALLY like Fear)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Frud5RFtTi0
  #69  
Old 03-08-2017, 11:27 PM
4d3fect 4d3fect is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Incidentally, the instrument in "Good Vibrations" isn't a standard theremin, which is played with no physical contact at all with the instrument. It's something called an electro-theremin, or Tannerin, and is played by moving a slide across across a rod with the right hand, and using the left hand on a knob to control volume.

Here's a video of a tannerin.

Compare with theremin.

Similar sounding instruments, significantly different manner of playing.
Played by Paul Tanner, I assume?

Last edited by 4d3fect; 03-08-2017 at 11:30 PM.
  #70  
Old 03-09-2017, 03:48 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is online now
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Wagakki band feature samisen, koto, wadaiko and shakuhachi solos live. Here's a great bit of Beni Ninagawa on samisen.

While there are no solos per se, the shakuhachi, taiko and koto bits in songs like this do gives an idea of the quality of the solo performances in live songs.
  #71  
Old 03-09-2017, 04:23 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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Early jazz went in some odd directions sometimes.

In 1924 Clarence Williams' Blue Five recorded Mandy, Make Up Your Mind with a solo by Sidney Bechet on an instrument most people have never heard of: a sarrusophone.

Runnin' Ragged (Bamboozling the Bassoon) by Joe Venuti's Blue Four, recorded in 1929, features a solo by Frank Trumbauer on (what else?) bassoon.

A Mug of Ale by Joe Venuti's Blue Four, recorded in 1927, features Adrian Rollini on both bass saxophone and a sort of tiny clarinet he called the "hot fountain pen."

Getting away from early jazz, Going Up the Country by Canned Heat features a series of flute solos.
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Last edited by Jeff Lichtman; 03-09-2017 at 04:23 AM.
  #72  
Old 03-09-2017, 04:58 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is online now
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Can't mention mandolin without referencing Rod Stewart's "Maggie May".

The harpsichord occasionally makes an appearance in various songs; my personal fave is the uneven-metered (and oddly-tuned) solo in "Golden Brown" by The Stranglers. The whole song is pretty much unconventional.
  #73  
Old 03-09-2017, 08:31 AM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is offline
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Originally Posted by Jeff Lichtman View Post
Getting away from early jazz, Going Up the Country by Canned Heat features a series of flute solos.
The music for "Going Up the Country" was borrowed from "Bull Doze Blues" by Henry Thomas, who originally played those solo breaks on a type of panpipe called the quills.
  #74  
Old 03-09-2017, 09:07 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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A song played on a solo saxophone

Last edited by Annie-Xmas; 03-09-2017 at 09:08 AM.
  #75  
Old 03-09-2017, 09:53 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Gyrate View Post
Can't mention mandolin without referencing Rod Stewart's "Maggie May".

The harpsichord occasionally makes an appearance in various songs; my personal fave is the uneven-metered (and oddly-tuned) solo in "Golden Brown" by The Stranglers. The whole song is pretty much unconventional.
Interesting song. Never heard it before, but it's basically all in 3s, except for the harpsichord interlude, where it's threes with a four every fourth measure (so 3+3+3+4).
  #76  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:02 AM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
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I don't think I've seen mention of the violin solo in CSN's "Wasted on the Way." Come for the vocal harmonies, stay for the fiddle!

Saxophone solos were all over Motown songs. The Four Tops' "It's the Same Old Song" has a pretty good one. The sax solo that ends Marvin Gaye's "Mercy Mercy Me", played by Wild Bill Moore, is particularly beautiful.

Last edited by MrAtoz; 03-09-2017 at 10:03 AM.
  #77  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:08 AM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
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Traffic's "Low Spark of High Heeled Boys" - I'm not even sure what the instrument is that is being played in the solo. To me it sounds like a sax being run through an effects box of some sort, but it could be keyboards, or I don't know what.
Bingo. See here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8M8R835Ck4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Lichtman View Post
A Mug of Ale by Joe Venuti's Blue Four, recorded in 1927, features Adrian Rollini on both bass saxophone and a sort of tiny clarinet he called the "hot fountain pen."
After listening to the recording, I'm inclined to believe that short "tiny clarinet" solo is soprano sax. My teacher used to refer to soprano sax as "weasel horn." which describes it quite well. (No disrespect to all those soprano sax players out there, you know who you are.)

Lotsa of great mentions in this thread, I love that they're all over the place musically. Dopers have big ears!

Oh, and the mellow instrument in Jackie DeShannon's hit "What the world needs now" is euphonium, which is a valved tenor horn. Like a tuba but smaller.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUaxVQPohlU

Here's Maynard Ferguson taking a chorus on euphonium: (WARNING: Maynard was the "King of the High Cs" and he starts on trumpet up in the screaming range, so you might want to adjust your speakers/headphones so your head won't asplode. Just saying.) Yes, children. that's how we dressed in the Fabulous '70s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agB9iuev7h4

your humble TubaDiva
  #78  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:30 AM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is offline
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Originally Posted by TubaDiva View Post
People have argued about the "Low Spark" solo for years. Yes, it's sax on that live version, but on the studio version it's Steve Winwood on organ played through a fuzzbox. (Note how it begins playing over Chris Wood's brief saxophone break.)
  #79  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:40 AM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
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Oh! French horn, Leon Russell, "A Song For You." Sublime.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvazuyF6eXw
  #80  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:42 AM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
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Originally Posted by Biffy the Elephant Shrew View Post
People have argued about the "Low Spark" solo for years. Yes, it's sax on that live version, but on the studio version it's Steve Winwood on organ played through a fuzzbox. (Note how it begins playing over Chris Wood's brief saxophone break.)
Looks like it's both, doesn't it?
  #81  
Old 03-09-2017, 12:43 PM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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Here's another one from early jazz: the Mound City Blue Blowers was led by Red McKenzie, whose instrument was comb and tissue paper. Here he is on Hello, Lola, recorded in 1929.

The line-up for this record is really impressive: Red McKenzie on comb, Glenn Miller on trombone, Pee Wee Russell on clarinet, Coleman Hawkins on tenor sax, Eddie Condon on banjo, Jack Bland on guitar, Pops Foster on string bass and Gene Krupa on drums.
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  #82  
Old 03-09-2017, 12:56 PM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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Originally Posted by TubaDiva View Post
After listening to the recording, I'm inclined to believe that short "tiny clarinet" solo is soprano sax.
It isn't a soprano sax.This is what a soprano sax sounds like. The hot fountain pen has the breathy tone of a clarinet, not the raspy, nasal tone of a sax.

Here is a period ad for the hot fountain pen.
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  #83  
Old 03-09-2017, 01:09 PM
Scarecrow's Brain Scarecrow's Brain is offline
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"I Think I'm Going To Kill Myself" by Elton John, 1972. The song was originally planned to feature Elt's stepfather playing the spoons. When that didn't pan out, they got Legs Larry Smith (from Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band) to tap dance. Elton's band wondered if Legs would bring anything else to the studio besides tap shoes, and one member joked he might bring a floor with him. They had a good laugh at the thought. Surprise, surprise, Legs brought a floor to the studio.

Live performance with Legs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkbhYmPH-58

Also from that same album, Honky Chateau:

"Mellow" and "Amy" feature electric violin solos by Jean-Luc Ponty (it sounds almost like an organ in "Mellow").

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMCcdc97kb8 -- "Amy"

and "Hercules", while this is not a solo, features a "rhino whistle" during the instrumental. What's a rhino whistle? It was just a noise producer Gus Dudgeon could make cupping his hands over his mouth. Someone suggested it sounded like a rhino whistle, and that's how it was listed as in the credits.

sb
  #84  
Old 03-09-2017, 01:21 PM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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Here's Adrian Rollini again from the days of early jazz (he really liked oddball instruments). He played something he called a "goofus" (it's official name was a "couesnophone") - a keyed multi-reed instrument shaped like a saxophone. Here is an article about it.

Here is Adrian Rollini with a goofus solo on "Bessie Couldn't Help It" by Rube Bloom and His Bayou Boys. The solo starts at 2:26.
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  #85  
Old 03-09-2017, 01:34 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Not a solo, but Wrecking Crew drummer Hal Blaine used ashtrays as percussion instruments on the Beach Boys' "Barbara Ann" (called out in the recording as "Hal and his famous ashtray!"), as well as on Dean Martin's "Houston," and also played snow tire chains on Simon and Garfunkel's "Bridge Over Troubled Water."

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141...-wrecking-crew
  #86  
Old 03-09-2017, 02:07 PM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
Bzzzt. It sounds exactly like a trumpet, because it is.
Silly me! I meant "Cool, Calm, and Collected," from the same album (Between the Buttons).

That's a kazoo, right?
  #87  
Old 03-09-2017, 02:18 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by TubaDiva View Post
Oh! French horn, Leon Russell, "A Song For You." Sublime.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvazuyF6eXw
One of my favorite songs.

Quote:
But I love you in a place where there's no space and time
I love you for my life, you are a friend of mine
And when my life is over
Remember when we were together
We were alone and I was singing this song for you
  #88  
Old 03-09-2017, 02:49 PM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
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Originally Posted by Jeff Lichtman View Post
It isn't a soprano sax.This is what a soprano sax sounds like. The hot fountain pen has the breathy tone of a clarinet, not the raspy, nasal tone of a sax.

Here is a period ad for the hot fountain pen.
Ha! Learn something new every day if you're not careful.

Since it takes soprano sax reeds, we're still in the same ballpark. Weasel horn by any other name ...

Never seen or heard about this before today ... I know a lot of trad jazz people and have never seen this anywhere.

Thanks for enlightening me!
  #89  
Old 03-09-2017, 02:53 PM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
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Originally Posted by Scarecrow's Brain View Post
"I Think I'm Going To Kill Myself" by Elton John, 1972. The song was originally planned to feature Elt's stepfather playing the spoons. When that didn't pan out, they got Legs Larry Smith (from Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band) to tap dance. Elton's band wondered if Legs would bring anything else to the studio besides tap shoes, and one member joked he might bring a floor with him. They had a good laugh at the thought. Surprise, surprise, Legs brought a floor to the studio.

Live performance with Legs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkbhYmPH-58

Also from that same album, Honky Chateau:

"Mellow" and "Amy" feature electric violin solos by Jean-Luc Ponty (it sounds almost like an organ in "Mellow").

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMCcdc97kb8 -- "Amy"

and "Hercules", while this is not a solo, features a "rhino whistle" during the instrumental. What's a rhino whistle? It was just a noise producer Gus Dudgeon could make cupping his hands over his mouth. Someone suggested it sounded like a rhino whistle, and that's how it was listed as in the credits.

sb
Bonzo Dog! The ultimate "different instrument" track! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8DUEAG5eO6c
  #90  
Old 03-09-2017, 05:38 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by JKellyMap View Post
Silly me! I meant "Cool, Calm, and Collected," from the same album (Between the Buttons).

That's a kazoo, right?
Yep. Brian (Jones) played kazoo, harmonica, and electric dulcimer on that one. I might have suspected your switcheroo had I not forgotten about that song.

Last edited by TreacherousCretin; 03-09-2017 at 05:40 PM.
  #91  
Old 03-09-2017, 09:09 PM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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Great, thanks!
  #92  
Old 03-09-2017, 09:53 PM
bunyupp bunyupp is offline
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I see I messed up earlier and included a bass solo. So, how about a Chainsaw solo.
  #93  
Old 03-10-2017, 12:58 PM
Sam Spayed PI Sam Spayed PI is offline
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
If the OP's really interested, I'm sure we could come up with many more examples of sax solos.
Has anyone yet mentioned Jerry Rafferty's "Baker Street"? It is unique amongst pop songs (as far as I know) by using a saxophone solo to serve as the chorus.
  #94  
Old 03-10-2017, 01:54 PM
CharmaChameleon CharmaChameleon is offline
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I hesitate to mention one of my favorites, the twin violin solo in "Within Attraction" from the 1993 "Yanni Live at the Acropolis", just about takes the cake for me. Orchestra conductor Shardad Rouhani and band solo violinist Karen Briggs played a "statement-recapitulation-answer" dual solo that's longer about 7 minutes long. It's worth your time to look it up, I think. (I think Briggs mopped the floor with the concertmaster! He did a fine job, even so.)

I'm very fond of the saxophone solo/refrain in Gerry Rafferty's 1978 "Baker Street", and to Johnny Colla's absolutely ripping saxophone bridge solo in the 1984 "The Heart of Rock & Roll" by Huey Lewis and the News.

(Doggone it, Sam Spade PI, you got in ahead of me. Good work.)

Last edited by CharmaChameleon; 03-10-2017 at 01:55 PM. Reason: ninja'ed
  #95  
Old 03-10-2017, 05:19 PM
psychonaut psychonaut is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Novelty Bobble
MANDOLIN!
For a moment there I thought I heard Viv Stanshall! Silly me.
  #96  
Old 03-10-2017, 07:01 PM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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I just thought of another. Bennie Moten's Kansas City Orchestra sometimes featured Buster Moten on accordion (Buster was Bennie's brother, uncle, cousin or nephew - no one knows for sure). Here, Buster starts off Moten's Blues with an accordion solo.
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  #97  
Old 03-11-2017, 12:31 PM
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Buckethead (guitar) and That 1 Guy (Magic Pipe)
  #98  
Old 03-11-2017, 01:42 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by 4d3fect View Post
Played by Paul Tanner, I assume?
Apparently, yes. I did not know that or even think to look that up until now. Nice bit of trivia to know. ETA: And he also plays on "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times."

Last edited by pulykamell; 03-11-2017 at 01:44 PM.
  #99  
Old 03-11-2017, 02:49 PM
bunyupp bunyupp is offline
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It's possible this is NSFW!

The band is Sukekiyo (a band featuring Dir En Grey's singer Kyu). The song is Aftermath and the bowed instrument is a/the Taishōgoto.
  #100  
Old 03-14-2017, 03:31 PM
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I hope this counts - Acker Bilk playing a beautiful clarinet solo in 'Stranger on the Shore'.
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