Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #101  
Old 04-15-2017, 12:58 AM
Asuka Asuka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 364
There's a local "Irish Pub and Restaurant" except I'm positive they only added the "And Restaurant" part to trick people to come in because it looks like a normal bar except in the corner there's two tables with two chairs each while everything else is normal barstool seating (and ironically enough you can't eat at the actual bar) I once got some food from there to-go because I was curious and it tasted like generic over-sauced barfood except way more expensive, like five chicken wings for $9.
Advertisements  
  #102  
Old 04-15-2017, 02:26 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 26,916
They might not be trying to make money on the restaurant part. It might be easier in some places to get an alcohol license if you also sell food.
  #103  
Old 04-15-2017, 05:13 AM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 5,925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gyrate View Post
They are indeed. Mostly I blame hipster-types for trying to be all clever and edgy in their eschewing of plates. Where I have encountered it, it is generally impractical, messy and annoying.
Some of those are pretty ridiculous, but I don't think we can blame it all on hipsters. Decades ago, I ate at a truck stop restaurant called Iron Skillet. Everything was served on an iron skillet. This included, for instance, the salad bar, where you had to carry an ice-cold skillet by the handle as you piled stuff on it, trying not to tip it laterally. I'm pretty sure I lost a few cherry tomatoes.
  #104  
Old 04-15-2017, 08:57 AM
DummyGladHands DummyGladHands is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,605
Ugh, Melting Pot. Got sick as dog there from cross contamination.
  #105  
Old 04-15-2017, 09:07 AM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: F.O.S.O.N.E.
Posts: 19,905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann Hedonia View Post
Oh, I love The Melting Pot as an occasional thing... And it's really expensive. It takes me by surprise every time.
Insanely so, given that the kitchen does little besides prep.
  #106  
Old 04-15-2017, 09:17 AM
Pantastic Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asuka View Post
There's a local "Irish Pub and Restaurant" except I'm positive they only added the "And Restaurant" part to trick people to come in because it looks like a normal bar except in the corner there's two tables with two chairs each while everything else is normal barstool seating (and ironically enough you can't eat at the actual bar) I once got some food from there to-go because I was curious and it tasted like generic over-sauced barfood except way more expensive, like five chicken wings for $9.
How do the local alcohol laws work where the restaurant is? In a lot of areas, it can be hard to get a 'bar' license but easy to get a 'restaurant' license to serve alcohol, and they may just be doing the bare minimum to be technically a restaurant.
  #107  
Old 04-15-2017, 10:14 AM
Odesio Odesio is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 11,363
This might not qualify but I disliked most of the theme restaurants that starting popping up in the 1990s. Theme restaurants weren't exactly new, Showbiz Pizza was started in the 70s for example, but in the 1990s they seemed to be everywhere with restaurants like The Rainforest Cafe, Planet Hollywood, The Jekyll & Hyde Club, etc., etc. And they were all pretty bad.
  #108  
Old 04-15-2017, 10:24 AM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: F.O.S.O.N.E.
Posts: 19,905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odesio View Post
This might not qualify but I disliked most of the theme restaurants that starting popping up in the 1990s. Theme restaurants weren't exactly new, Showbiz Pizza was started in the 70s for example, but in the 1990s they seemed to be everywhere with restaurants like The Rainforest Cafe, Planet Hollywood, The Jekyll & Hyde Club, etc., etc. And they were all pretty bad.
Manhattan had the kid-themed Mars 2112, which was a hoot to visit but like most of these, had pretty indifferent food. I found it amusing that they had some KILLER cocktails and mixed drinks for Mummy and Daddums.

I do have an idea for a really badass theme restaurant, but I'm wise enough to know I can't do more than write a check for someone who knows what they're doing. I've been the cook for a very large family for a long time, and I understand how I could fool myself into believing that's enough to run a restaurant... but learned better without making the big, expensive mistake.
  #109  
Old 04-15-2017, 10:36 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 12,828
Did anybody else notice that, right after 9-11, McDonalds stopped offering serrated plastic knives with carry-out meals, so terrorists could not pull up at the drive=through window on their way to the airport? After that, the plastic knives just had straight edges, unsuitable for cutting throats of flight attendants.
  #110  
Old 04-15-2017, 10:40 AM
Ann Hedonia Ann Hedonia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odesio View Post
This might not qualify but I disliked most of the theme restaurants that starting popping up in the 1990s. Theme restaurants weren't exactly new, Showbiz Pizza was started in the 70s for example, but in the 1990s they seemed to be everywhere with restaurants like The Rainforest Cafe, Planet Hollywood, The Jekyll & Hyde Club, etc., etc. And they were all pretty bad.
The original Jekyll and Hyde Club was awesome, upon entering it at first felt like one of those ubiquitous places that hung antique crap everywhere, the spookiness and the nature of the decor snuck up on you.

But then they had to keep making it "bigger and better" until it was so obvious and overblown that it was just another tourist trap.

Last edited by Ann Hedonia; 04-15-2017 at 10:40 AM.
  #111  
Old 04-15-2017, 10:45 AM
Ann Hedonia Ann Hedonia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Did anybody else notice that, right after 9-11, McDonalds stopped offering serrated plastic knives with carry-out meals, so terrorists could not pull up at the drive=through window on their way to the airport? After that, the plastic knives just had straight edges, unsuitable for cutting throats of flight attendants.
I'm old enough to remember them changing their coffee stirrers from a long handled mini-spoon design to a long handled flat blade stirrer. This was allegedly done because the spoons were being widely used as cocaine paraphernalia.

http://www.snopes.com/business/origins/mcdspoon.asp
  #112  
Old 04-15-2017, 03:25 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 12,178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reno Nevada View Post
The hell? What kind of crawfish dish were you eating, and what kind of utensil were you using? Crawfish Alfredo at Red Lobster or something?

Crawfish New Orleans style is pretty much guaranteed to be boiled whole in spices along with potatoes and corn. The corn will be left with a coating of spices, which includes a lot of red pepper. You crack the crawfish with your bare hands. It is a huge mess and takes a long time to eat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
One of my favorites is the crawfish platter at Pappadeaux (typically comes with fried crawfish and crawfish etoufee, pictured here. Given the amount of meat in a crawfish, I don't want to waste time dissecting them en masse. I'll happily pay someone else to do it for me.
There are two kinds of Cajun fare. One is prepared dishes like etouffee, or fried crawfish. The other kind is the crawfish boil, which is as described - whole crawfish boiled, typically in a bunch of spices with corn and potatoes. You peel and eat by hand. That's the way it's done.

Crawfish boils are real popular along the Gulf coast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeGee View Post
I'm guessing you wouldn't care for Joe's on Tybee Island that has both feral cats and alligators.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
Alligator, OK. I'm not into the idea of eating feral cats.
Grrr, ninja'd. "Are either of those easier to peel and eat than crawfish?"


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Every restaurant is built on "that one corner". The location isn't special; the business is. Running a restaurant successfully is a lot harder than most people think, and requires a very different skill set, with the result that most restaurants fail very quickly. So you get one place open up somewhere, and unsurprisingly, it fails. It's followed by another, and another, and unsurprisingly, they fail too. Eventually, if the place isn't torn down, you get management in who has the knack for business, and you get a restaurant that sticks around for decades. Until the owner retires, and then the cycle starts again.
While it is true that many restaurant ventures fail for a variety of reasons that often boil down to poor management, there are some locations that are not as supportive as others. For instance, in suburbs where different polities are mushed together such that the borders are indistinguishable, you can have differing tax rates on streets a mile apart. Or parking can be nonexistent in an area where foot traffic is not high.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hogarth View Post
*shudder* WTF?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Musicat View Post
I don't know if they still exist, but in LA there was a chain called "Mongolian BBQ" where you selected the oriental-style ingredients yourself, put them in a bowl, then gave the bowl to the chef, who stir-fried them on a large, circular grill.
Not only is that a thing, there are now chain versions, like Genghis Grill and Gobi Mongolian.

Back in Clear Lake, long before the chain fad there was a mom and pop that had good Mongolian BBQ, my first introduction to the concept. It was open for two decades (or longer), but then the old man retired and handed it over to his son, and between that and the spring up of the new chains, they went out of business. Too bad - I liked them for the variety difference from Genghis Grill, which I also like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep's Phoenix View Post
I ate at a Genghis Grill at Charlotte-Douglas once. It was the same concept described here for a Mongolian Grill, except you just ordered and they put pre-portioned food on the rotating grill. It was pretty decent...Yelp tells me it's closed now though.
That doesn't sound like the Genghis Grill I have patronized.
  #113  
Old 04-15-2017, 05:59 PM
E-DUB E-DUB is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,023
No one's mentioned the "Frog and Peach"? Just for grins.
  #114  
Old 04-15-2017, 06:18 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,715
Got a call from my daughter in Manhattan this afternoon. She was waiting in line to get into this place.

Fuckin' hipsters.
  #115  
Old 04-15-2017, 06:36 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
Got a call from my daughter in Manhattan this afternoon. She was waiting in line to get into this place.

Fuckin' hipsters.
Waiting in line for 4 + hours?!?
  #116  
Old 04-15-2017, 07:10 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,715
Actually, her wait was closer to 30 minutes. She called because she wanted someone to talk with and pass the time.

In fact, I was her second choice.
  #117  
Old 04-16-2017, 09:26 PM
bmoak bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
Christina Tosi, one of the supposed judges on Master Chef USA, runs a "restaurant" called Milk Bar. She serves such delicacies as "cereal milk".
Why so snarky? Christina Tosi is a pastry chef. Milk Bar is a bakery. It sells cookies, cakes, pies and a few savory stuffed breads. Is it really odd for (an admittedly quirky) bakery to sell drinks that go with those things? The cereal milk is also used as a base for ice cream and shakes.

My NYC contribution to this thread is Rice to Riches, a place that only sells rice pudding in many different varieties. It's been open for several years.
  #118  
Old 04-16-2017, 10:16 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Citrus Heights, CA, USA
Posts: 13,392
Quote:
Why so snarky? Christina Tosi is a pastry chef. Milk Bar is a bakery. It sells cookies, cakes, pies and a few savory stuffed breads. Is it really odd for (an admittedly quirky) bakery to sell drinks that go with those things? The cereal milk is also used as a base for ice cream and shakes.
Because she pretends to be a gourmet chef who bloviates as a judge.
  #119  
Old 04-17-2017, 12:19 AM
Quint Quint is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gyrate View Post
There's a particular item that made me somewhat queasy just looking at it.
That is insane.
  #120  
Old 04-17-2017, 12:38 AM
Quint Quint is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoeless View Post
A guy I used to work with had the same problem. He never could get the local Chinese place to make his food spicy enough, even when he said to make it as hot as they could. It's like they were afraid they were going to hurt him.

So one day when he asked them to make it as hot as possible, he added "Nuclear." It was like the light bulb finally came on.

So they brought his lunch, and as he was eating it his nose was running and sweat was pouring down his forehead. The waitress timidly walked up and asked "Is it OK?" And he grinned and gave her a big thumbs-up.
My buddy tells a similar story. Every time he would eat in the Chinese place by his work he would ask for super spicy. No matter how often he asked for as spicy as they could, it was always a letdown. So one day he asks for it "spicy like you would make it spicy for yourself". He takes one bite and his head started sweating- finally spicy heaven! The waiter came up to him and said "Today the food is free- you pay for the water!!" to big laughs all around.
  #121  
Old 04-17-2017, 05:20 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 13,608
Tyler Cowen, in his book An Economist Gets Lunch, says that he has ways to get good Chinese food even in small town Chinese restaurants that normally serve very poor, very Americanized food. He asks to speak to the cook, he asks for food the way the cook likes it himself, and he throws in phrases like "Ma Po Tofu, like you eat it," "real Chinese food," "family style," "Sichuan," and "spicy." He says that he can get fairly good food that way.
  #122  
Old 04-17-2017, 07:06 AM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 7,115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
Tyler Cowen, in his book An Economist Gets Lunch, says that he has ways to get good Chinese food even in small town Chinese restaurants that normally serve very poor, very Americanized food. He asks to speak to the cook, he asks for food the way the cook likes it himself, and he throws in phrases like "Ma Po Tofu, like you eat it," "real Chinese food," "family style," "Sichuan," and "spicy." He says that he can get fairly good food that way.
Tyler Cowen is a lot of things but I've always found his food advice to be overly simplistic and idealistic. The tactic he espouses is pretty hit or miss. There are some Chinese restaurant chefs who were excellent cooks back in China and are just champing at the bit to let their culinary talents fly in Hicksville USA. But far more likely, especially these days, is someone who came to America with zero culinary training or aptitude and learned everything they know about cooking via a rigid apprenticeship program inside of Chinese American restaurants in the US. They're likely to be far more knowledgeable about Chinese American cooking than authentic Chinese food.
  #123  
Old 04-17-2017, 07:36 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Mesa, Ariz.
Posts: 3,226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quint View Post
My buddy tells a similar story. Every time he would eat in the Chinese place by his work he would ask for super spicy. No matter how often he asked for as spicy as they could, it was always a letdown. So one day he asks for it "spicy like you would make it spicy for yourself". He takes one bite and his head started sweating- finally spicy heaven! The waiter came up to him and said "Today the food is free- you pay for the water!!" to big laughs all around.
Years ago the local repertoire movie theatre ran a samurai film festival where they showed a pair of them each week for like six weeks. A bunch of us at work liked them so we attended each one, eating first in a nearby Indian restaurant (there being no Japanese ones close). It was a tiny place with a half-dozen tables where Wife did the cooking and Hubby worked the front. We kept asking for the hot curry until the fourth week, he asked, "Do you want the really hot curry?" "We-l-l-l..." "I'll put it on the side."

Capsaicin heaven. We took it the remaining two weeks.
  #124  
Old 04-17-2017, 09:35 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Did anybody else notice that, right after 9-11, McDonalds stopped offering serrated plastic knives with carry-out meals, so terrorists could not pull up at the drive=through window on their way to the airport? After that, the plastic knives just had straight edges, unsuitable for cutting throats of flight attendants.
Remember the McDonalds coke spoons?

For a short time, the coffee stirrers had a small spoon bowl instead of the flat blade they have now. I never did drugs and I still recognized what they had accidentally done at first sight.

I mentioned it to the counterperson and they responded that they were for the coffee, not the Coke®. I gave them the personal equivalent of and then the penny dropped. Hilarious.
  #125  
Old 04-17-2017, 09:36 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 519
OOPS!

should have read on…
  #126  
Old 04-17-2017, 10:30 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 41,271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
Years ago the local repertoire movie theatre ran a samurai film festival where they showed a pair of them each week for like six weeks. A bunch of us at work liked them so we attended each one, eating first in a nearby Indian restaurant (there being no Japanese ones close). It was a tiny place with a half-dozen tables where Wife did the cooking and Hubby worked the front. We kept asking for the hot curry until the fourth week, he asked, "Do you want the really hot curry?" "We-l-l-l..." "I'll put it on the side."

Capsaicin heaven. We took it the remaining two weeks.
What sometimes works, if you really want it hot, is asking for the dish as "Indian spicy" or "Thai spicy" or "Thai extra spicy." But that does depend on the server really trusting you and your heat tolerance. Or how sadistic they are. Plus there are places where the heat levels are all over the map. There's one Laotian-Thai place in my neck of the woods where just the regular "spicy" is hotter than the "Thai spicy"s are at other places, and their "Thai spicy" is wonderfully blazing (for certain dishes--I don't like them all at that heat level, but there's a couple dishes I enjoy where the flavors can stand up to pretty much as spicy as a restaurant will make it.) I think it also depends on the people running the place and their tolerance for heat. While these cuisines are, on average, quite spicy to the average American palate, they're not necessarily blow-your-head-off spicy if you're used to spicy food. Adding a shitload of hot peppers does not make it necessarily any more "authentic."

Last edited by pulykamell; 04-17-2017 at 10:31 AM.
  #127  
Old 04-17-2017, 11:29 AM
K364 K364 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 2,195
There's a strong trend that started in the high-end restaurants and is spreading down to the mid-prices ones:

You have to order your entree and sides separately. You don't get a plate of food anymore - you have to build it.

So, if you want a steak with starch and veggies you are forced to order a giant plate of broccoli for $14 and a baked potato for $12. The "logic" is that these can be sharing plates for the rest of the table.

I don't share. I don't go to these restaurants.
  #128  
Old 04-17-2017, 12:04 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 72,187
I've always had a really tough time telling Indian restaurants how to make my food. My usual instruction is "Tell the chef to make it the way that he likes it, and don't tell him that I'm white". Even that doesn't usually work, though.
  #129  
Old 04-17-2017, 12:04 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by K364 View Post
There's a strong trend that started in the high-end restaurants and is spreading down to the mid-prices ones:

You have to order your entree and sides separately. You don't get a plate of food anymore - you have to build it.

So, if you want a steak with starch and veggies you are forced to order a giant plate of broccoli for $14 and a baked potato for $12. The "logic" is that these can be sharing plates for the rest of the table.

I don't share. I don't go to these restaurants.
Yes, that is common in high end steakhouses. But that's the way i like it. I wanna eat a real nice steak and not get filled up with a salad, baked potato and the like. They bring you a small loaf of fresh baked bread, and a large juicy steak. I need nothing else.
  #130  
Old 04-17-2017, 06:25 PM
Xybyx Xybyx is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
Because she pretends to be a gourmet chef who bloviates as a judge.
She's not pretending. She came up working with David Chang and her stuff is very high quality. Her products are all original and she is one of the only people out there using advanced techniques from Molecular Gastronomy and Science to make her products. She's the real deal.
  #131  
Old 04-17-2017, 06:46 PM
The Man In Black The Man In Black is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
Some of those are pretty ridiculous, but I don't think we can blame it all on hipsters. Decades ago, I ate at a truck stop restaurant called Iron Skillet. Everything was served on an iron skillet. This included, for instance, the salad bar, where you had to carry an ice-cold skillet by the handle as you piled stuff on it, trying not to tip it laterally. I'm pretty sure I lost a few cherry tomatoes.
I got a kick out of this. I currently work at an Iron Skillet restaurant. We still serve everything (except pasta) on iron skillets, including the salad bar.
  #132  
Old 04-17-2017, 07:06 PM
Jeep's Phoenix Jeep's Phoenix is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 5,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amateur Barbarian View Post
I think that was it. This would have been in Sacramento, around... 2005?
This one showed up -- or became popular -- in the Raleigh, NC area around 2003 or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
That doesn't sound like the Genghis Grill I have patronized.
They probably stripped down the concept so it could be crammed into an airport. I would definitely try a proper Genghis Grill if I encountered one.
  #133  
Old 04-17-2017, 07:20 PM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 5,925
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Man In Black View Post
I got a kick out of this. I currently work at an Iron Skillet restaurant. We still serve everything (except pasta) on iron skillets, including the salad bar.
Ha! I'm glad to see I remembered correctly; I had to have been around 12 at the time (on a road trip with my grandparents in Ohio... not a place I visit all that much these days). Those cold, heavy skillets were especially difficult for a scrawny kid to handle, but I learned something about angular momentum that day.
  #134  
Old 04-19-2017, 01:03 AM
zweisamkeit zweisamkeit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: detroit, east-side
Posts: 4,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
I've always had a really tough time telling Indian restaurants how to make my food. My usual instruction is "Tell the chef to make it the way that he likes it, and don't tell him that I'm white". Even that doesn't usually work, though.


"Don't whitespiceTM me, bro!"
  #135  
Old 04-19-2017, 07:30 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 28,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
What sometimes works, if you really want it hot, is asking for the dish as "Indian spicy" or "Thai spicy" or "Thai extra spicy."
I semi-fondly remember a Chinese food truck near my workplace in Philadelphia, where the guy dishing out the meal would look at you and say "You like spicy, right?".

It's good when the default is scalp-sweating hot food.
  #136  
Old 04-19-2017, 08:28 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-DUB View Post
No one's mentioned the "Frog and Peach"? Just for grins.
I've heard the routine from Beyond the Fringe, and saw Peter Cooke and Dudley Moore perform it on Broadway in Good Evening, so I was surprised to learn that there really ARE restaurants called "The Frog and the Peach". I assumed that they got their inspiration from the comedy routine. But you never know.

One is in New Brunswick, NJ:

http://frogandpeach.com/



Here's another, in Georgia:

https://locu.com/places/the-frog-and...t-savannah-us/

https://www.yelp.com/biz/the-frog-an...uffet-savannah
  #137  
Old 04-19-2017, 08:51 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 41,271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
I semi-fondly remember a Chinese food truck near my workplace in Philadelphia, where the guy dishing out the meal would look at you and say "You like spicy, right?".

It's good when the default is scalp-sweating hot food.
A Thai restaurant made me a customer for life (which, unfortunately, wasn't that long as it closed down a few years later) when, on my first visit, I asked for it "Thai spicy" and the owner paused, looked at me with a raised eyebrow and said "Are you sure?" In all the times I've used this phrase, I have never been asked about the seriousness of my request; the question having more a tone of a warning, rather than confirmation.

Caught slightly off-guard, I hesitated a sec before answering "yes." He let out a long, drawn-out "O...K..." which trailed off into an implied "you asked for it." The meal did not disappoint. It was the spiciest I've ever gotten on my first trip from a Thai restaurant (And I actually was a little bit nervous before taking that first bite.)
  #138  
Old 04-19-2017, 11:29 AM
DrCube DrCube is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Caseyville, IL
Posts: 6,529
I love Papa Murphy's, but I'm always struck by their business model. A pizza restaurant with no oven. So, not a restaurant at all, more like a mini-grocery store that sells nothing but pre-made (but not frozen) pizzas and raw cookie dough.

My cousin, back when he was younger, stopped by Papa Murphy's when it first opened in his town. He ordered the pizza and they gave it to him, and he said, "Aren't you going to cook it?" The cashier replied, "We don't have an oven", and my cousin said, "I don't have an oven either!" He ended up having to drive to his mom's house to cook his dinner.
  #139  
Old 04-20-2017, 09:38 AM
DummyGladHands DummyGladHands is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,605
Medieval Times. Awful, awful, awful. Eating bad food in the dark with the smell of horse manure.
  #140  
Old 04-20-2017, 10:49 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 10,162
Quote:
Originally Posted by DummyGladHands View Post
Medieval Times. Awful, awful, awful. Eating bad food in the dark with the smell of horse manure.
...and with no utensils.
  #141  
Old 04-20-2017, 11:07 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 28,402
...and such small portions.
  #142  
Old 04-20-2017, 03:43 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Sturgeon Bay, WI USA
Posts: 19,901
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
I love Papa Murphy's, but I'm always struck by their business model. A pizza restaurant with no oven. So, not a restaurant at all, more like a mini-grocery store that sells nothing but pre-made (but not frozen) pizzas and raw cookie dough.

My cousin, back when he was younger, stopped by Papa Murphy's when it first opened in his town. He ordered the pizza and they gave it to him, and he said, "Aren't you going to cook it?" The cashier replied, "We don't have an oven", and my cousin said, "I don't have an oven either!" He ended up having to drive to his mom's house to cook his dinner.
You're supposed to cook it?! My, my!
  #143  
Old 04-20-2017, 11:39 PM
Bad News Baboon Bad News Baboon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: A house.
Posts: 3,702
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
Ha! I'm glad to see I remembered correctly; I had to have been around 12 at the time (on a road trip with my grandparents in Ohio... not a place I visit all that much these days). Those cold, heavy skillets were especially difficult for a scrawny kid to handle, but I learned something about angular momentum that day.
Hey, at least they had a handle. There is a restaurant called Whiskey Cake that served me an appetizer on a plank atop a brick.

A brick.
  #144  
Old 04-21-2017, 12:08 AM
Asuka Asuka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musicat View Post
You're supposed to cook it?! My, my!
My family had the same thing happened to them, on a road trip we stayed at a hotel in a pretty small town and the only place that was open at 9pm after we checked in was a Papa Murphy's, so we all went in happy and hungry that we were going to get some great pizza only to be told that we'd have to make it ourselves and since we had no oven at the hotel we were extremely disappointed.

Looking at their website now apparently they now have ready-made appetizers like bread sticks and salads but at the time we went it was just simply pizza.

Also does anyone else think "Tilted Kilt" is an interesting idea but executed horribly? It's basically Hooters with waitresses in skimpy tops and kilts and is supposed to resemble a vaguely Scottish pub but when I went they just had hip-hop music playing at an entirely too loud volume, most of the menu was generic American pub food (burgers and wings) and my table was right next to a claw machine that would randomly play "fun" noises every 30 seconds. So basically they just stole everything from Hooters without even attempting to make it unique or interesting.
  #145  
Old 04-21-2017, 11:51 AM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asuka View Post

Also does anyone else think "Tilted Kilt" is an interesting idea but executed horribly? It's basically Hooters with waitresses in skimpy tops and kilts and is supposed to resemble a vaguely Scottish pub but when I went they just had hip-hop music playing at an entirely too loud volume, most of the menu was generic American pub food (burgers and wings) and my table was right next to a claw machine that would randomly play "fun" noises every 30 seconds. So basically they just stole everything from Hooters without even attempting to make it unique or interesting.
Yes, the one out here closed down. The girls had more of a college girl having fun vibe as opposed to the stripper vibe.

But the food was meh. Not horrible, just meh, and yes, the music was too loud.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:38 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017