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Old 07-08-2017, 01:22 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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Gregory Crewdson - how does he make photographs look like paintings?

I like his new series, Cathedral of the Pines.

They remind me of watercolor paintings.
Like this
https://goo.gl/images/gT6Y1m

But they are photographs. Is he heavily manipulating them in Photoshop? He only says he uses diffused lighting. He's doing more than that to get this look. They could easily be mistaken for paintings.

They are quite well done. I'd love to have full size framed prints for the wall. I really like the white house winter scene. The street photo is very good too.
http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/07/arts/g...ery/index.html
Quote:
Crewdson carefully constructs his tableaux and then bathes them in soft, suffusing twilight, real and artificial. Then he takes the photograph. Something has happened or is about to happen; we don't know quite what.

Last edited by aceplace57; 07-08-2017 at 01:26 PM.
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Old 07-08-2017, 02:30 PM
don't ask don't ask is offline
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There was an Australian radio program some years ago about Crewdson.

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/...regory/3658338 There are a couple of images of his sets among the photos here.

And you can listen to the interview with him here. Interestingly he mentions that he never takes the photo himself.
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Old 07-08-2017, 06:12 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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Awesome. I'll play the interview later this evening.

Thank you for the link
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Old 07-08-2017, 06:58 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Dunno how he, specifically, does it, but there are some very nice image-processing filters that take pictures and make them look like oil-paintings. Take a look at dreamscopeapp.com -- they have a gallery of samples on their home page. For further exploration you need to sign in, but they appear to work for free.

There are painting and drawing apps for lease -- not free, but not horribly expensive -- and some of them have "oil painting" filters. The results can be pretty impressive.
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Old 07-08-2017, 07:26 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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The Filters sound interesting. I have a few photos of landscapes that might be improved that way.

I'll try dreamscopeapp.com first.
Several of their examples are very nice.

Last edited by aceplace57; 07-08-2017 at 07:28 PM.
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Old 07-08-2017, 07:50 PM
beowulff beowulff is offline
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The quintessential photo-to-painting program is Studio Artist, which has been around for ages.
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Old 07-08-2017, 09:03 PM
pabstist pabstist is offline
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I've seen his photos in real life, and they are not at all watercolor like, rather they are super sharp focused. Very realistic. They do not look like paintings in any way.

Have you only seen images of the photos on the site you linked? Here's a better image of the first photo shown there-
http://thephotographicjournal.com/wp....The-Shed2.jpg

The prints in this series are also about 4 by 5 feet. Maybe you could hang it on your dining room wall. But, a lot of his earlier works are almost billboard sized!

Yeah, he's probably my favorite artist working these days in any medium.

Last edited by pabstist; 07-08-2017 at 09:05 PM. Reason: oops
  #8  
Old 07-08-2017, 09:15 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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That is a lot sharper than the image on CNN. I hadn't noticed the paintings leaning on the wall.

It's the vibrant colors that reminds me of water color paintings.

The rich, earthy brown in that photo. The contrasting bright green. Very nice composition.

I probably can't afford his work unless prints become widely available.

Last edited by aceplace57; 07-08-2017 at 09:18 PM.
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Old 07-08-2017, 09:44 PM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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All photographs do go through Photoshop or similar post-processing these days, for adjusting the lighting via High Dynamic Range, or sharpening, and many are blends of multiple photos taken at different times or exposures to have them all in focus or to be the work of art they're after.

I think what you're perceiving is a low contrast, overcast light with a very long lens makes everything unusually, but carefully, composed and composited.
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Old 07-08-2017, 10:05 PM
Banquet Bear Banquet Bear is offline
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...Crewdson lights his images like a movie set. He uses big huge soft light to light his images, and is meticulous in planning his images, which includes the balance of colours that he choose to use in his final shot.

https://nz.pinterest.com/pin/199988039675817789/

Crewdson shoot his work to be seen big. This gallery picture shows how big his prints are.

https://artblart.files.wordpress.com...tion-e-web.jpg

There is an extraordinary amount of detail in these shots. This is one of my favourite Crewdson images:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iaUuJP1tMu...ses_-2006.jpeg

If you look real closely, through the mist in the background you can see a group of people there. Its hard to see online, but you can see them clear as day when looking at the print. I'm sure he is as meticulous with his post processing as he is with planning and producing the shoot. But it isn't just the post processing that makes these shots so unique: its the attention to detail, its the pre-planning, its the deep-depth of field.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-c...ects-48744461/

My favourite quote from the interview was "we had to cancel the rain shoot because it rained." These are carefully crafted images, not spontaneously captured. He typically has limited print runs of 10 prints only, and they sell for up to $150,00 per print. But that isn't surprising when each shot might cost over a hundred thousand dollars to produce. So I don't think he is planning on making his prints more widely available.
  #11  
Old 07-08-2017, 10:15 PM
running coach running coach is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
That is a lot sharper than the image on CNN. I hadn't noticed the paintings leaning on the wall.

It's the vibrant colors that reminds me of water color paintings.

The rich, earthy brown in that photo. The contrasting bright green. Very nice composition.

I probably can't afford his work unless prints become widely available.
You could go to one of the exhibits and take pictures.
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