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  #51  
Old 05-13-2017, 04:57 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Originally Posted by RobDog View Post
Across the pond, one should know what a tine is, and that a fish fork has three of them, otherwise one would be identified as an irredeemable oik who would probably drink from the finger bowl and use ghastly words such as "toilet" and "serviette".
Yes, whereas us Yew individuals use the correct terms, "crappah" and "nappy" and "figger", fnar fnar fnar.

Heah, pull mai figger, deah boi!
  #52  
Old 05-13-2017, 08:17 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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tine, n.1

(taɪn)

Forms: α. 1, 3–6 tind, 4–6 tynde, 5 tyynde, 6 (9 dial.) tynd. β. (5 tene), 5–9 tyne, 6– tine.

[OE. tind = MHG. zint sharp point, ON. tindr tine (Sw. tinne, Da. dial. tind tooth of a rake):—OTeut. *tind-iz. (To the same root prob. belongs OHG. zinna merlon of a wall:—OTeut. *tindjôn-.) OE. tind became in ME. tīnd, as in bind, etc.; whence, by loss of d, tine, as in tind v. Cf. WFris. tine, tooth of fork, etc.]

1.1 Each of a series of projecting sharp points on some weapon or implement, as a harrow, fork, eel-spear, etc.; a prong, spike, tooth.

α a 700 Epinal Gloss. (O.E.T.) 873 Rostris, foraeuuallum, uel tindum. c 725 Corpus Gloss. (ibid.) 1753 Rostri, tindas. ? a 1400 Erasmus (Bedf. MS. lf. 280) in Horstm. Altengl. Leg. (1878) 202 Castyng hym oftyn on şe tyndes of an harow. c 1400 Laud Troy Bk. 15724 Thei‥Sclow hem thikkere with her arwes Than tyndes of tre stondis In harwes. c 1440 Promp. Parv. 494/1 Tyynde, prekyl (K. tynde, pryke), carnica. 1668 R. B. Adagia Scot. 37 Many maisters, quoth the Poddock to the Harrow, when every tind took her a knock.

β 1554 Lydgate's Bochas ix. vi. 200 b/2 The fiery tines of his brennyng arow. 1591 Greene Art Conny Catch. ii. (1592) 25 A long hooke‥that hath at the end a crooke, with three tynes turned contrary. 1642 Fuller Holy & Prof. St. iii. xxi. 211 That fork needing strong tines wherewith one must thrust away nature. 1644 [Walsingham] Effigies True Fortitude 12 An old man‥with his Pitchforke ran at Captaine Smith, and twice stroke the tynes thereof against his breast. 1649 W. Blithe Eng. Improv. Impr. xvi. (1653) 104 Two or three sorts of Harrows, each Harrow having his Teeth or tines thicker than other. 1721 [see tig n.1 1]. a 1734 North Lives (1826) II. 201 A fork with five tines. 1789 Trans. Soc. Arts I. 100 A harrow composed of coulters instead of tines. 1828 Craven Gloss., Tine, the prong of a fork‥; also the tooth of a harrow. 1968 J. Arnold Shell Bk. Country Crafts 92 The larger, called a drag rake, carrying about thirty tines compared with fifteen for the garden rake. 1978 Cornish Guardian 27 Apr. 10/4 (Advt.), 60in rotavator with new tines. 1979 P. Theroux Old Patagonian Express (1980) xiv. 289 The man jerked the tines of his fork into a slab of ham.

2. a.2.a Each of the pointed branches of a deer's horn.

α [a 1000 Sal. & Sat. (Kemble) 150 Anra ᴁehwylc deor hæbbe synderlice xii hornas irene, and anra ᴁehwylc horn hæbbe xii tindas irene, and anra ᴁehwylc tind hæbbe synderlice xii ordas.] c 1375 Sc. Leg. Saints xxix. (Placidas) 105 A gret hart‥he saw betwen his tyndis brycht A verray croice schenand lycht. c 1430 Syr Tryam. 1085 The herte stroke hym wyth hys tyndys. 1513 Douglas Æneis vii. ix. 18 This hart‥With large heid and tyndis fwrnest fayr. 1593 Rites of Durham (1903) 24 Dyd cast backe his handes betwixt ye Tyndes of ye said harte to stay him selfe.

β 1495 Trevisa's Barth. De P.R. xviii. xxx. 792 The aege of hartys is knowe by auntlers and tynes of his hornes, for euery yere it encreacith bi a tyne vnto vii yere. 1616 Surfl. & Markh. Country Farme 684 You may likewise iudge of their age by the tynes of their hornes. 1825 Scott Talism. xxiv, A stag of ten tynes. 1877 Encycl. Brit. VII. 23 The antlers of the Stag are rounded, and bear three ‘tines’ or branches, and a crown consisting of three or more points.‥ The antlers during the second year consist of a simple unbranched stem, to which a tine or branch is added in each successive year, until the normal development is attained.

†b.2.b A small branch or twig of a tree; the stalk of a fruit. Obs. rare.

13‥ E.E. Allit. P. A. 78 As bornyst syluer şe lef onslydez, Şat şike con trylle on vcha tynde [rime schynde]. 13‥ Minor Poems fr. Vernon MS. lii. 82 His hed nou leoneş on şornes tynde. c 1440 Pallad. on Husb. iv. 395 Pomes take, The tenes with, to stonde in cannes saue.

c.2.c transf. Each of two branches of a stream.

1875 R. F. Burton Gorilla L. (1876) II. 73 We reached a shallow fork, one tine of which‥comes from the Congo Grande.

†3.3 A rung or step of a ladder. Obs. rare.

a 1225 Ancr. R. 354 Scheome and pine, ase Seint Bernard seiğ, beoğ şe two leddre stalen‥and bitweonen şeos stalen beoğ şe tindes ivestned of alle gode şeawes, bi hwuche me climbeğ to şe blisse of heouene.

4.4 [f. tine v.3] An act of harrowing.

1778 W. H. Marshall Minutes Agric. 12 Dec. an. 1776, Our first tine was with fine harrows, which broke the crum, without tearing-up the sod. 1825 Jamieson s.v., A double tynd, or teind, is harrowing the same piece of ground twice at the same yoking. 1854 Jrnl. R. Agric. Soc. XV. ii. 403 Some sow it after the barley, and give it a tine with the harrows.

†5.5 attrib. and Comb.: tine-knife, see quot.; tine nail (tynd nale), a large sharp-pointed nail, a spike. Obs.

1555–6 Burgh Rec. Edinb. (1871) II. 322 For xixxx of grait tynd nalis to the greit yat of the tolbuith. 1888 Sheffield Gloss., Tine-knife, a knife whose haft is made from a tine of a stag's antler.



prong, n.2

(prɒŋ)

Forms: α. 5–6 prange, 6 prannge, prang. β. 5–7 pronge, 6 prongue, 7 prung, 6– prong. See also sprong.

[Known only from c 1500; origin and etymology obscure; perh. related to prec.; cf. MLG. prange a pinching, also a pinching instrument, a horse's barnacle (Franck). But in sense more akin to prag n.1, prog n.1, as if a nasalized variant of these.]

1. a.1.a An instrument or implement with two, three, or more piercing points or tines; a forked instrument, a fork. In many specific uses, now chiefly dial.; e.g. a fork to eat with, a table-fork; a long-handled fork for kitchen use; a kind of fire-iron; a rural implement, a pitchfork, hay-fork, dung-fork, digging-fork.

1492 Ryman Poems lv. 4 in Archiv. Stud. neu. Spr. LXXXIX. 221 Dethe hathe felde me with his pronge. [Cf. lxxxv. 5 When dredefull deth to the shal come And smyte the with his spronge.] 1501 Will of Treffry (Somerset Ho.), A Prange of siluer for grene gynger.


ETA: OED

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 05-13-2017 at 08:17 PM.
  #53  
Old 05-13-2017, 09:57 PM
raventhief raventhief is offline
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Leo does that answer, in your opinion, how many individuals are familiar with the word?

Op, yes i know what a tine is.
  #54  
Old 05-13-2017, 10:27 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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No, raventhief, I see now that it doesn't, and it's good you pointed it out. If I get around to it I'll ask a mod to delete it; I'm not going to ask him to give me a warning because that would be junior modding and then I'd get two.

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 05-13-2017 at 10:27 PM.
  #55  
Old 05-13-2017, 10:52 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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I've probably said "tine" or "tines" only a couple of times in my life. I know what they are; I just don't need to use the words much.
  #56  
Old 05-14-2017, 02:43 AM
China Guy China Guy is offline
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IME it is more commonly a "fork tine" or "pitchfork tine". As in catch it on your fork tine (versus catch it on your tine).

Not a word I hear or use much though.
  #57  
Old 05-14-2017, 02:53 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
Didn't anyone watch Cagney & Lacey or Judging Amy? Those shows used "tine" daily.
And per the OP, how wide can she spr ... no, no, never mind.
  #58  
Old 05-14-2017, 08:31 PM
UDS UDS is offline
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In Texas - common enough that pretty much everyone knows what it means, would be my guess. Way more common that "aglet."
HibE: Pitchforks and fork-life trucks have tines. Table forks have prongs, unless you're being pedantic or showing off, in which case they can have tines. Aglets are the protective metal or plastic tubes on the end of shoelaces that stop them from fraying.
  #59  
Old 05-14-2017, 08:38 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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HibE: Pitchforks and fork-life trucks have tines. Table forks have prongs, unless you're being pedantic or showing off, in which case they can have tines. Aglets are the protective metal or plastic tubes on the end of shoelaces that stop them from fraying.
Weird. I think of table forks as having tines and pitchforks as having prongs.
  #60  
Old 05-14-2017, 10:11 PM
watchwolf49 watchwolf49 is offline
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Some farm equipment have tines so I'd say it's a fairly common term
It's a common term in California farm country ... I've never heard rototiller "blades" called anything else ...
  #61  
Old 05-14-2017, 11:22 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is online now
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I've lived in the upper Midwestern U.S. for nearly all of my life. I know what "tines" are, in the context of a fork, and that's the term I'd use to describe them on a fork, on those rare occasions when I'd have to refer to them.

I don't think that I ever use the term otherwise, but then, I have little experience with pitchforks (and other farming implements) or forklifts. I think I'd be more likely to use the term "prong" for anything other than the tines on a fork.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 05-14-2017 at 11:22 PM.
  #62  
Old 05-15-2017, 09:18 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
....

I don't think that I ever use the term otherwise, but then, I have little experience with pitchforks (and other farming implements) or forklifts. I think I'd be more likely to use the term "prong" for anything other than the tines on a fork.
But you'd be WRONG!
... a 42 inch wide model 5000 rider reach truck manufactured by Crown Equipment Corporation ... includes a power unit including a battery compartment, an operator's compartment, a mast assembly, an overhead guard 35, and a pair of forks carried by a fork carriage mechanism [illustration citations removed]
cite: Patent: Straddle arm for fork lift truck US 6199665 B1

* Researched and posted before finishing morning coffee so now I and kenobi and the TM know something for certain that was hardly even with checking *

ETA: And UDS is WRONG too.
ETA 2: What's that? Yeah? Well prove it. Yeah.

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 05-15-2017 at 09:23 AM.
  #63  
Old 05-15-2017, 09:26 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Hardly even worth checking unless you're filing a patent or buying a forklift or parts and then they'd know they have a sucker on their hands.
  #64  
Old 05-15-2017, 12:03 PM
CurtC CurtC is offline
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In the silver set we had when I was growing up, the salad forks had three tines and dinner forks had four and one must understand this.
Around my house, if it has four tines, it's a "fork," and if it has three, it's a "threek."
  #65  
Old 05-15-2017, 02:00 PM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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One for the Tolkien-nuts: a principal peak of the Misty Mountains is that called in the Common Speech [English], Silvertine (Elvish, Celebdil; Dwarvish, Zirakzigil); from the summit of which IIRC, Gandalf finally casts the Balrog down. One would infer that said mountain's topmost peak is rather pointy in shape. (If anyone ever had a big vocabulary, JRRT did for sure...)
  #66  
Old 05-15-2017, 02:49 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Around my house, if it has four tines, it's a "fork," and if it has three, it's a "threek."
I have a friend who talks about his fivehead (a forehead plus a receding hairline).
  #67  
Old 05-15-2017, 06:20 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Around my house, if it has four tines, it's a "fork," and if it has three, it's a "threek."

Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I have a friend who talks about his fivehead (a forehead plus a receding hairline).
and
  #68  
Old 05-15-2017, 06:39 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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A wild night out with St. Michael wielding his sword at Old Nic the devil and screaming at him, while deaf (Fr. "sourd") to his pleas:
“Mickmichael’s soords shrieking shrecks through the wilkinses and neckanicholas’ toastingforks pricking prongs up the tunnybladders. ”
Sword/(toasting fork) gives us Wilkins razors, naturally, and is swung through the welkin (a word used in Shakespeare for "the space outdoors").

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 05-15-2017 at 06:42 PM.
  #69  
Old 05-15-2017, 06:48 PM
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To the best of my knowledge, "welkin" means "sky" or "the heavens". None of my dictionaries define it as anything like "the space outdoors".
  #70  
Old 05-15-2017, 07:08 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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To the best of my knowledge, "welkin" means "sky" or "the heavens". None of my dictionaries define it as anything like "the space outdoors".
Going on memory of Twelfth Night. Where, in fact, the dialogue essentially is on what the hell does "welkin" mean, anyway?
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Old 05-15-2017, 07:11 PM
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You've got it all covered, but for one more joke. I heard a comedian say that unsalted saltines should just be called 'tines (or was that 'ines?
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  #72  
Old 05-15-2017, 10:31 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Frankenstein, not Fronkensteen.
  #73  
Old 05-16-2017, 12:01 AM
markn+ markn+ is offline
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Going on memory of Twelfth Night. Where, in fact, the dialogue essentially is on what the hell does "welkin" mean, anyway?
Hm, David and Ben Crystal's Shakespeare's Words defines "welkin" as "sky, firmament, heavens", but has a separate entry for "out of one's welkin" (used only in Twelfth Night) meaning "out of one's element, none of one's business". The great C.T. Onions' A Shakespeare Glossary defines "welkin" as "sky" but adds a note "used ludicrously in T[welfth] N[ight] out of my welkin". The line comes at the end of a long sequence of word plays by Feste, and the Riverside Shakespeare suggests that he's here playing on the fact that "element" and "welkin" can both mean "sky", but "out of my element" is a common phrase while "out of my welkin" is not. The Riverside's footnote on this line says "Feste gives a final example of how words can be made 'wanton'."
  #74  
Old 05-16-2017, 07:53 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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I might add that of the two Canadians who had never heard the term, I used in the connection with the the things that stick up in my dishwasher, two of which had broken off. I still think it appropriate to call them tines and somehow prongs seems wrong.
  #75  
Old 05-17-2017, 07:04 PM
Kiwi Fruit Kiwi Fruit is offline
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74 posts and only one mention of the tines on a rake? I thought that would be more commonly used than tines on a fork
I used mine this morning to clear the leaves from the street gutter and catchpit.
  #76  
Old 05-24-2017, 04:54 PM
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I am familiar with tine, but use it rarely. I, too, love the song "Tine after Tine". I also love the one that goes:
Are you ringin' in the ears
Stowin' away the tines
Are you gatherin' up the tears
Have you had enough of mine
Because dropping lots of forks makes that ringing sound that's hard on the hearing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
However, the patent document has neither prong or* tine in it, so I must be missing something.

Now as to what is a tine and what is a pring - a spear is collection of "tines" when 1) each spear is adjacent to other spears, and 2) spear separation does not exceed two spear widths, and 3) each spear length does not exceed 10 spear widths.

Any other spear arrangement is composed of "prongs".^

I think those two Canadians that didn't know "tine" were just pretending to be Canadians. They were probably Belgians sneaking in to Canada from the US.

* I so want to use 'nor' here
^ and I am unanimous in that!

Last edited by Corner Case; 05-24-2017 at 04:56 PM.
  #77  
Old 05-25-2017, 10:16 AM
August West August West is offline
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Didn't anyone watch Cagney & Lacey or Judging Amy? Those shows used "tine" daily.
This was terrible. Bravo!
  #78  
Old 05-25-2017, 10:49 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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This was terrible. Bravo!
Ok. Help me out with the obvious joke or pun I'm missing. It's been driving me nuuts.
  #79  
Old 05-25-2017, 11:27 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Ok. Help me out with the obvious joke or pun I'm missing. It's been driving me nuuts.
Tyne Daly, actress.
  #80  
Old 05-25-2017, 11:46 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Tyne Daly, actress.
Ah. I'm terrible at actor names.
  #81  
Old 05-25-2017, 04:46 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
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Seems like parents hardly teach manners these days, let alone the finer points of table settings.
Snerk!

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Sez you. (It's Victorian, of course.)
Scroll down to the bottom "beef fork".
  #82  
Old 05-25-2017, 05:18 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Funny, I eat at Katz's fairly often, and must have missed it.


FTR, a cousin had a deli for decades at Grand and Essex, right next to Kussar's Biyalis
  #83  
Old 05-26-2017, 10:05 AM
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Back at Cornell I was part of a team doing a multi-week scavenger hunt with one clue given each day. I can't remember the full clue but part of it was "Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Tine."

Knowing the original was "... Thyme" we assumed this was a clever way of directing us to the dining hall at Sage Hall. We spent most of lunch and part of dinner scouring the rooms there including removing a painting of Rosemary to search behind it, much to the chagrin of the staff.

Eventually we approached the clue a different way and found that day's object in a location that had nothing to do with Sage or Tines. With proof of our success in hand so he would know he wasn't giving anything away we approached the clue writer to ask what the heck Tines had to do with the clue as we could make no connection between Tines and the solution.

He admitted the entire line was simply for color, he simply misheard the line from the song when he used it, and he was unaware of the meaning of either Tine or Thyme. We resisted the urge to strangle him.

So, if you're keeping score, for us it was 80%. Four team members well aware of what a tine was, and one clue writer who was blissfully ignorant.

Last edited by Pixel_Dent; 05-26-2017 at 10:06 AM.
  #84  
Old 05-26-2017, 03:00 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Undressing my dog, this thread came to mind with these end-attachment thingies that squeeze together and expand within a receptacle to lock.

It occurred to me that an important feature of the etymology and current usage of prong and tine is incorrect with those things, and I stumbled momentarily on the name of those little bits, one of which (prong, I'll go with) broke a bit off and doesn't catch.

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 05-26-2017 at 03:01 PM.
  #85  
Old 05-26-2017, 04:35 PM
CelticKnot CelticKnot is offline
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I know "stiles" as the steps that allow people to climb over a fence across a footpath while preventing animals from getting out.
And there was a mysterious affair at one of those places...
  #86  
Old 05-26-2017, 06:10 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Which styles of cabinets do not have stiles?
Coffee ones, for one.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_cabinet
  #87  
Old 05-26-2017, 06:40 PM
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Undressing my dog, this thread came to mind with these end-attachment thingies that squeeze together and expand within a receptacle to lock.
Those are known as side release buckles, in case you want to google them. Not sure what they call the three projections.
  #88  
Old 05-29-2017, 12:13 AM
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Also, watching an Australian TV show (Bondi Vet) a lot of the same colloquialisms are completely shared with North American English. How did that happen?
1) We watch a lot of TV from NYC

2)Aus was a significant trade destination (wool), and had significant contact with the American West Coast. A lot of Australians went to California for the gold rush. A lot of Californians came to Aus for the gold rush.
  #89  
Old 05-29-2017, 12:22 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Is that the link to the fact (a stunning one to me when I learned it) that the consummate sheep herding dog, the Aussie (Australian Shepherd), is an American breed but named by (for?) its main owners?

Now this is a hijack...
  #90  
Old 05-29-2017, 12:28 AM
davidm davidm is offline
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Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
Today, two English speaking Canadians (one from Montreal, one from Toronto) astonished me by never having heard the word "tine". I won't say it is the commonest word in my ideolect, but both my wife (from NYC) and I (from Philly) are certainly familiar with it. So I am curious now. Is it used, say, in Idaho? Across the pond. And it you don't use it, what do you call the tines of a fork? Prongs, maybe?
As another data point: I'm from the same area as the OP (actually the Philly 'burbs) and I've always known those parts of a fork as tines. It's not a word that comes up in conversation much, but it's hardly obscure.
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