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  #1  
Old 08-20-2001, 09:16 PM
Oldmaid85 Oldmaid85 is offline
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The problem with (black) graphite powder, as commonly used to lubricate door hinges, is that it sometimes works its way out of the hinge and stains the surrounding area over time. Though I've been able to remove this graphite from the surrounding woodwork, it has permanently stained small portions of nearby wallpaper. (The bottom hinge is always the worst offender.)

I've tried WD-40 and other sprays as a substitute, but this just liquifies the mess and then it drips onto the carpet below.

What might I use as a substitute to the graphite? Would white silicon grease work? I have no problem cleaning the graphite off the door hinges and starting anew; I just don't know what to use instead.
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  #2  
Old 08-20-2001, 09:45 PM
fenrir fenrir is offline
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Yes grease would do the job just fine.It's what i use on the squeaky doors myself.
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  #3  
Old 08-20-2001, 10:26 PM
DPWhite DPWhite is offline
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my locksmith said...

When I got my fancy new lock, it had trouble turning, and my locksmith recommended that I not use graphite, but get a teflon based spray. I got some at the hardware store. I works on everything. Locks, squeaky belts in my car engine.
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  #4  
Old 08-20-2001, 10:59 PM
handandahalf handandahalf is offline
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Seconding DPWhite...

Teflon-based sprays are great! I started using them on rifles and shotguns that I was going to fire in sub-zero temperatures, where most gun oils start to gum up and do more harm than good. Then I used it on concealed-carry guns that I didn't want shedding oil on my good pants and shirts. Now, two years later, I use it on almost all of my firearms exclusively! If it works for a gun, I'm sure that door hinges would pose no problems.
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  #5  
Old 08-21-2001, 01:17 AM
Zenster Zenster is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Oldmaid85
...I've tried WD-40 and other sprays as a substitute, but this just liquifies the mess and then it drips onto the carpet below...
This is half of your problem. Notice how the WD-40 rinses out any other lubricants? I never use the stuff myself. I believe it to be most functional at removing any oils or tribological enhancers, as opposed to whatever the manufacturer may claim. This stuff, with its misleading advertising, has probably ruined more equipment than most bad advice.

Whatever you employ, apply it in moderation. Spraying enough to the point where it drips is overapplication. Silicone grease or teflon based lubricants (as mentioned above) are a great place to start. However, you may find that judiciously applied sewing machine oil will do the job for one tenth to one hundredth of the price. Use a cotton swab and go easy on the verschluginer lube job! M'kay?
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  #6  
Old 08-21-2001, 09:44 AM
handy handy is offline
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Let's do it like a real guy. take out the door hinge pin, clean it, put grease on it & put it back. Do the top one then the bottom one so the door don't fall down.
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  #7  
Old 08-21-2001, 06:43 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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You can use talc powder, this also aplies to squeeky pieces of wood.
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  #8  
Old 08-21-2001, 10:05 PM
Jois Jois is offline
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Beeswax is good for odd jobs like this because it is not supposed to attract or retain lint and little dust bits.

I save WD-40 for removing things like sticky stuff that won't wash off my hands or if I'm using a staining sealer, I wipe my hands off with wd-40 first then dish soap then hand soap. Works wonders. Spray cooking oil like Pam works almost as well as wd-40 for cleaning hands and a lot of sticky stuff, too.

Some rat used graphite on all the door hinges here before I bought this house and all it still shows.
Jois
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  #9  
Old 08-21-2001, 11:20 PM
Chas.E Chas.E is offline
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Hey, I was just thinking that I saw a white lubricant powder, works like graphite except it's white. Lithium maybe? I can't recall, just something I think I saw in a hardware store. Maybe.
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  #10  
Old 08-22-2001, 01:50 AM
golgotha golgotha is offline
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spray some cooking oil in there. what the hell.
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  #11  
Old 08-22-2001, 10:40 AM
handy handy is offline
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For years our library would put wd40 on their door whenever it squeaked. They had to do this often & it worked. I told them to put some oil on it instead.
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  #12  
Old 08-22-2001, 11:09 AM
micco micco is offline
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Re: my locksmith said...

Quote:
Originally posted by DPWhite
When I got my fancy new lock, it had trouble turning, and my locksmith recommended that I not use graphite, but get a teflon based spray.
The problem with graphite in locks is that it will pack into the spring chambers behind the pins and prevent the pins from rising. I've cleaned several locks that were jammed up by graphite.

This isn't a problem in open devices like hinges, but doesn't help the OP. I agree with you about teflon sprays.
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  #13  
Old 08-22-2001, 11:18 AM
micco micco is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by golgotha
spray some cooking oil in there. what the hell.
Be careful what you stick in there.

In my youth, I knew a girl who wanted to oil her squeaky bed springs. She used the only lubricant she had handy, which was butter. A couple of days later, she was driven from the house by the rancid smell.

Imagine someone with a squeaky bed who can't find a better lube than butta...
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  #14  
Old 08-22-2001, 11:27 AM
Syzygy Syzygy is offline
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I always use a white lithium spray grease. It's thick enough that it stays where it's put. I use it on door hinges in my house and car.
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  #15  
Old 08-24-2001, 10:25 AM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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There's a spray powder called Slide that's Zinc Stearate. It works very nicely for some applications.

--Nott
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  #16  
Old 08-24-2001, 11:47 AM
inertia inertia is offline
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Re: my locksmith said...

Quote:
Originally posted by DPWhite
When I got my fancy new lock, it had trouble turning, and my locksmith recommended that I not use graphite, but get a teflon based spray. I got some at the hardware store. I works on everything. Locks, squeaky belts in my car engine.
Dude, you seriously don't want to use a lubricant on the belts in your car's engine. Your belts squeal because they are slipping. Sure it stops squeaking, but that's because the belts are now slipping even more which is exactly what you don't want it to do. Your A/C won't run as cold, your Alternator won't supply the proper voltage. It's a bad scene. They've got Stop Squeal to use for that. It makes things sticky. More stick = less slip = no squeal.
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  #17  
Old 08-24-2001, 04:19 PM
Wonko The Sane Wonko The Sane is offline
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I've used candlewax. Stays put, and all you have to do is push the hinge out of alingnment, and scrape some wax onto the bearing surfaces- then realign the hinge, and put the pin back. Give it a few swings and there you go.
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  #18  
Old 08-24-2001, 04:29 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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Want a cheap household remedy? Vaseline (or generic petroleum jelly)

Take the pins out, wipe them clean and apply a little plain white petroleum jelly with a tissue. Smoosh it around. Works like a charm, doesn't melt at room temperature, and if it does it leaves only an innocuous oil slick.
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  #19  
Old 08-29-2010, 12:08 PM
jsammartino jsammartino is offline
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graphite

What is best possible way to remove graphite from door hinges
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  #20  
Old 08-29-2010, 12:22 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsammartino View Post
What is best possible way to remove graphite from door hinges
After nine years this really does nothing for Oldmaid85.
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  #21  
Old 08-29-2010, 12:24 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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moist zombie wipes or paper towels
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  #22  
Old 08-29-2010, 12:45 PM
Squink Squink is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunilou View Post
Want a cheap household remedy? Vaseline (or generic petroleum jelly)
Bacon grease, or if you've got it, bear fat, will work as well.

Once you take the pins out, soapy pipe-cleaners can be used to swab graphite and other gunk out of the hinge.
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  #23  
Old 08-29-2010, 12:50 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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Skunk Grease

It does double duty if you suffer from pleurisy.
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  #24  
Old 08-29-2010, 01:19 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsammartino View Post
What is best possible way to remove graphite from door hinges
Put the door hinge under extremely heat and pressure until the graphite forms diamonds. Then remove them. The simplest way is to remove the hinge pin and use compressed air and a cloth or small brush to clean the hinge, followed by the application of a light coat of paraffin or candle wax.
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  #25  
Old 08-29-2010, 05:13 PM
Jois Jois is offline
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Thanks, Tripolar, too bad about the diamonds but the simplest way if probably going to do the trick.

Jois
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  #26  
Old 08-29-2010, 06:20 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Quote:
Bacon grease, or if you've got it, bear fat, will work as well.
If I have bacon grease or bear fat in the house, I'm not going to waste it on a stupid door. The only hinge I'm lubricating with those is the one in my jaw.
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  #27  
Old 08-29-2010, 09:06 PM
Dano83860 Dano83860 is offline
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My mother always used Crisco. I guess that's what she had on hand. I always use lithium grease.

Last edited by Dano83860; 08-29-2010 at 09:07 PM..
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  #28  
Old 08-29-2010, 09:23 PM
longPath longPath is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dano83860 View Post
My mother always used Crisco. I guess that's what she had on hand. I always use lithium grease.
How does your pie crust taste?
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