Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-04-2017, 08:11 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
I would like for my remains to be used as a...

...medical school cadaver. So a few questions for any current or former med students/professors: (don't worry, there's no reason to suppose I need answers fast)

Is this still a thing? Do med students still get a cadaver to carve up and study?

Is there any way to condition my donation with the stipulation that it will be used as a medical school cadaver? Instead of a target for testing the effectiveness of a new design for flamethrowers, or something?

Is the fact that I currently have an artificial right hip a bar to having my cadaver issued to a student (as an aside, how would you like to be the student whose cadaver has TWO artificial hips? I'm not anticipating a high score on the "Anatomical Structures of the Hip" practicum. I guess I might as well start Spring Break early. See y'all in Cabo!)?

More questions may spring forth from these. TIA!
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 09-04-2017, 11:51 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 28,392
Yes, using donated bodies directed towards medical student training is still very much a thing. According to this recent article, donations are actually rising and helping to alleviate body shortages* (it seems that one way to get around high funeral costs is to donate your body - some med schools will return the remains to the family later, after cremation).

Having one artificial hip shouldn't be a bar to donation. It would probably add interest and educational value.

While med students have probably forgotten 90% of what they learned in gross anatomy class by the time they graduate, it's still a foundation for what they may need to know later on.

*nowhere near as critical a problem as in the 19th century, when med school profs dealt with illicit body snatchers like Burke and Hare.
  #3  
Old 09-04-2017, 12:23 PM
Do Not Taunt Do Not Taunt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
Having one artificial hip shouldn't be a bar to donation. It would probably add interest and educational value.
Interesting. What kind of things would prevent a university/hospital from being able to use your body as a med school cadaver?
  #4  
Old 09-04-2017, 12:41 PM
brossa brossa is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 903
Yes, this remains a thing. For example, here's the link for the body donation program at the University of Wisconsin medical school; here's the one for Oregon Health Sciences University; here for U of Iowa. Different programs have different requirements. Look up 'body donation' and the medical school of your choice on the Googler.

Videos of gross anatomy dissections as performed at UW-Madison are available here: you have been warned.

Having a hip replacement should not be a disqualifier, unless you die before the wounds heal, or you contracted a communicable disease like hepatitis or HIV or CJD as a result. Body size may be a disqualifier, or major trauma, or prior organ donation. I dissected a cadaver who had had her gallbladder and appendix removed, and another with artificial knees. Another cadaver in the lab had a plate in his skull. Students can move from cadaver to cadaver if their subject is, say, missing a colon, or has a grossly cirrhotic liver.

If you donate your body to a medical school, you still may or may not end up being dissected by med students. Probably you will, but they may end up using you piecemeal for other training purposes, like teaching surgical techniques, or preparing prosections. Ask whoever is running the program.
  #5  
Old 09-04-2017, 01:42 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 72,157
Personally, while I'd be happy with my remains being used to train med students, what I'd really like would be to be turned into one of those sliced-cadaever museum exhibits. But I'm guessing that that's a little harder to arrange.
  #6  
Old 09-04-2017, 03:52 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,474
My carcass would make a great Halloween decoration.
Especially if I dropped dead in April!
__________________
There he goes. One of God's own prototypes.
Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production.
Too weird to live, and too rare to die.
~~Hunter S. Thompson
  #7  
Old 09-04-2017, 04:26 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Obama Country
Posts: 6,364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Personally, while I'd be happy with my remains being used to train med students, what I'd really like would be to be turned into one of those sliced-cadaever museum exhibits. But I'm guessing that that's a little harder to arrange.
Go for it!
  #8  
Old 09-04-2017, 07:49 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
Good, so I should be successful with Phase 1.

Can I get funny tattoos on various places on my body, for the purpose of entertaining the student? Example: My family says I'm in "a better place" now. I'd say that's up to you.
  #9  
Old 09-04-2017, 10:42 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
Or on the back of my head: In case of resurrection technology, do NOT throw away.
  #10  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:35 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
Elephant Whisperer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,133
... conversation piece.
  #11  
Old 09-05-2017, 08:42 AM
JcWoman JcWoman is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,686
Don't have much to add to this, but very much recommend Mary Roach's book Stiff.
  #12  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:23 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
You could add a link...
  #13  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:57 PM
BeeGee BeeGee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 901
I'm partial to forensics body farm donations myself.
http://www.txstate.edu/anthropology/...donations.html
  #14  
Old 09-05-2017, 01:07 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 17,865
I've posted it here before ... but I made mutual wills with a friend of mine that the survivor of the two of is will make the other's skull into a drinking cup.
  #15  
Old 09-19-2017, 09:39 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeGee View Post
I'm partial to forensics body farm donations myself.
http://www.txstate.edu/anthropology/...donations.html
Wouldn't be much point to having smartass comments tattooed onto my body if the whole thing is going to get shot into a brick wall from a rail gun.
  #16  
Old 09-19-2017, 09:57 AM
Pantastic Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Not Taunt View Post
Interesting. What kind of things would prevent a university/hospital from being able to use your body as a med school cadaver?
A significant one now is size; really obese bodies are harder to use for learning because of the layers of fat, and can be too big for the equipment used to move bodies and tables to hold them. I think anyone over 300 pounds is too big for a med school to want as a donation.
  #17  
Old 09-19-2017, 11:30 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,068
All of me,
Why not take all of me
...♪

(I actually have that on my license organ donor card.)

Last edited by md2000; 09-19-2017 at 11:31 AM.
  #18  
Old 09-19-2017, 11:43 AM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by brossa View Post
Having a hip replacement should not be a disqualifier, unless you die before the wounds heal, or you contracted a communicable disease like hepatitis or HIV or CJD as a result. Body size may be a disqualifier, or major trauma, or prior organ donation. I dissected a cadaver who had had her gallbladder and appendix removed, and another with artificial knees. Another cadaver in the lab had a plate in his skull. Students can move from cadaver to cadaver if their subject is, say, missing a colon, or has a grossly cirrhotic liver.
AIUI, there is value in presenting the students with a wide variety of cadavers to work on so they develop an appreciation of the variability in human anatomy. If you have 30 gross anatomy students dissecting 30 cadavers, all of which were perfectly healthy adult males of median weight and height, they won't learn as much as if the cadavers are all different. Soooo, this cadaver had arthritis, that one had a hip implant, that other one had cirrhosis; everybody gather around this particular cadaver, and see what this condition looks like, and compare it mentally against what that healthy cadaver over there looks like.
  #19  
Old 09-19-2017, 12:03 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 72,157
Well, for some value of a "healthy cadaver".
  #20  
Old 09-19-2017, 12:09 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
Horrified Onlooker
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Moscow, Idaho
Posts: 5,024
I've always imagined myself, someday in the extremely distant future, being a fossil at the heart of a scientific controversy.
  #21  
Old 09-19-2017, 01:35 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 7,164
I kind of want to be made into a diamond.
  #22  
Old 09-19-2017, 02:10 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 38,067
Fertilizer.
  #23  
Old 09-19-2017, 02:36 PM
Bayard Bayard is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 5,237
Both of my parents arranged to donate their bodies to a medical school. My father passed away in 2015. The university collected his body from the hospital, although I think my mom had to pay for transport. I'm not sure. Anyway, this university has a service every year where some of the med students give talks about how important it was for them to have the opportunity to work on cadavers and how thankful they were to the families for allowing them to. One of the students said something to the effect of, the cadaver was her first patient. I thought that was nice. This university has a columbarium at a cemetery, with all the donors' names engraved on a monument.

AIUI, you can't do both organ donation and donate your body to a med school. I've always planned to have any usable organs donated, then have my body cremated. But I'm probably getting to the age where there won't be a helluva lot of demand for my organs after I'm done abusing them, so maybe I should revisit my thinking on the topic.
  #24  
Old 09-19-2017, 02:45 PM
Si Amigo Si Amigo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: North of 8 Mile
Posts: 3,923
body farm participate to help students study for crime scene investigation.
  #25  
Old 09-19-2017, 02:49 PM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilarity N. Suze View Post
I kind of want to be made into a diamond.
If you want to be worshipped, you can arrange for your ashes to become part of a Buddha statue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asahi Shimbun
OSAKA--A Buddha statue containing the ashes of a record-high 223,202 people was unveiled at Isshinji temple here, the first such Kotsubutsu (bone Buddha) created in 10 years.

The temple has a tradition dating back to 1887 of using human remains deposited in its care to make images of Amitabha Buddha.

The latest one is the 14th Kotsubutsu, and it contains the ashes of people laid to rest at the temple during the decade through 2016.
  #26  
Old 09-19-2017, 03:33 PM
DrCube DrCube is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Caseyville, IL
Posts: 6,529
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
A significant one now is size; really obese bodies are harder to use for learning because of the layers of fat, and can be too big for the equipment used to move bodies and tables to hold them. I think anyone over 300 pounds is too big for a med school to want as a donation.
That can't be comforting to hear if you're an obese person who nevertheless may need medical care one day. I would have assumed that from a medical scholar standpoint, the more variation the better.
  #27  
Old 09-19-2017, 03:45 PM
TimeWinder TimeWinder is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Albany/Corvallis, OR
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
A significant one now is size; really obese bodies are harder to use for learning because of the layers of fat, and can be too big for the equipment used to move bodies and tables to hold them. I think anyone over 300 pounds is too big for a med school to want as a donation.
Big or small. The Oregon Health Sciences link above indicates they won't take anybody under 100 pounds or over 200 because of something with their prep procedure.
  #28  
Old 09-19-2017, 04:02 PM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
That can't be comforting to hear if you're an obese person who nevertheless may need medical care one day. I would have assumed that from a medical scholar standpoint, the more variation the better.
I imagine working with a 275-pound cadaver doesn't teach a whole lot less than working on a 600-pound cadaver; either way, students will get the idea that there may be large amounts of adipose tissue in their way. Students intending to specialize in bariatric surgery can learn about working on extremely obese patients later on from experts in that field.
  #29  
Old 09-21-2017, 08:42 AM
Isilder Isilder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
While med students have probably forgotten 90% of what they learned in gross anatomy class by the time they graduate, .
Well , no ??? its a bit like They might only get perfect scores on 10% of anatomy diagrams, they'd still get 80% on each diagram ??

The important lessons from anatomy is what each part is meant to look like and what it does.. and the interconnections eg why would the kidney stones cause heart problems ?
  #30  
Old 09-21-2017, 08:50 AM
rbroome rbroome is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,815
timely thread.
I just toured our local Coroner's office yesterday. That question came up. The Coroner has passed on several bodies to medical schools here and in neighboring states. If they know about the situation in advance they are quite cooperative.
Likewise with the organ donation folks. Those folks watch the same network the Coroner and Police use to keep each other informed about the status of cases. They swoop in whenever a likely candidate shows up on the net.

Interesting tour.
  #31  
Old 10-01-2017, 07:22 PM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: In the land of OO-bla-dee
Posts: 10,518
If you're in the Atlanta area, consider gifting your carcass to the Emory University School of Medicine.

There's a bit of paperwork and your next of kin need to sign off on it, but if you don't believe in being planted and can meet their requirements it's a good option. I had a friend who did this and when he died at home Emory picked up the body from the Medical Examiner's office, easy peasy.

http://cellbio.emory.edu/research/bo...r-program.html
  #32  
Old 10-01-2017, 08:41 PM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Dammam, Saudi Arabia
Posts: 12,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by JcWoman View Post
Don't have much to add to this, but very much recommend Mary Roach's book Stiff.
This.

And you ought to be willing to test new flamethrowers. How else will we learn how to keep people safe? I used to work with landmines. (Nasty things.) I would very much like my legs to be used to test new protective equipment.
__________________
800-237-5055
Shrine Hospitals for Children (North America)
Never any fee
Do you know a child in need?
  #33  
Old 10-02-2017, 12:45 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isilder View Post
Well , no ??? its a bit like They might only get perfect scores on 10% of anatomy diagrams, they'd still get 80% on each diagram ??

The important lessons from anatomy is what each part is meant to look like and what it does.. and the interconnections eg why would the kidney stones cause heart problems ?
I would imagine by the time a doctor is actually operating on me (as opposed to listening to my hear and breathing) they are a bit more up to date with the studies of what they are digging for than "Lemme see, 10 years ago in med school I think the thingy was just behind these ribs...". I certainly hope when they are digging their finger in to check my prostate, they've at least done this often enough that anatomy class wasn't the last time they did this. (Unless I'm in a teaching hospital, then it serves me right if there's a lineup beside by bed...)
  #34  
Old 10-02-2017, 06:20 AM
Banksiaman Banksiaman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 518
I would like for my remains to be used as a...

Bicycle rack.

Failing that...

Some form of archaeological experiment
  #35  
Old 10-02-2017, 09:37 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: beautiful Idaho
Posts: 2,019
I thought this thread was going to be about how to get my ashes into Brooke Shields' shampoo bottle.
  #36  
Old 10-02-2017, 12:44 PM
Pantastic Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,739
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
That can't be comforting to hear if you're an obese person who nevertheless may need medical care one day. I would have assumed that from a medical scholar standpoint, the more variation the better.
I would not assume that medical schools spend the large amounts of extra money needed to have equipment that can hold, move, and store people over 300 pounds in their training areas. You need larger sturdier tables to work on the body, larger and more reinforced drawers to store them when not in use, larger and more reinforced cranes/stretchers/etc to move them from storage to the table, larger and more reinforced facilities for preserving the body in the first place, and so on. You also may run into safety issues having students attempt to move a larger body, which would require hiring extra staff or risking significant liability.
  #37  
Old 10-02-2017, 05:50 PM
janeslogin janeslogin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Nevada
Posts: 2,160
Wife and I have everything legally arranged by an attorney and a mortician but the last time we checked, several months go, both the med schools and the 'forensic body farms' were overbooked. They had too many potential cadavers queued up. So I don't know what happens if I were fortunate enough to croak today and no slot opens up.
__________________
Name is Janes, this is Janes' login
  #38  
Old 10-02-2017, 05:57 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 11,422
I would like to have my corpse dropped into a tar pit so that archaeologists a few dozen million years in the future can study my perplexing bones.
  #39  
Old 10-03-2017, 03:29 PM
janeslogin janeslogin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Nevada
Posts: 2,160
This was a fairly lively, howbeit mature, thread until someone made some adolescent joke about...nm...
__________________
Name is Janes, this is Janes' login
  #40  
Old 10-03-2017, 03:32 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 10,033
Maybe you'll develop an interesting condition that needs study.

My FIL passed away earlier this year and his remains were donated to Huntington's disease research. At some point whenever they finish doing whatever they're doing with him they will cremate him and return the ashes to us.
  #41  
Old 10-03-2017, 04:30 PM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: boise idaho
Posts: 1,405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
I've posted it here before ... but I made mutual wills with a friend of mine that the survivor of the two of is will make the other's skull into a drinking cup.
I find this idea utterly cool and fascinating.
Any idea how you or your friend will have this done? My search for someone who can/would do this kind of thing was fruitless.

Other than the skull cup thing, meh, donate me to whoever for whatever purpose, I'm probably not going to be in position to complain, much less care.
__________________
"I find your lack of candy disturbing" Darth Desserticola

Last edited by guestchaz; 10-03-2017 at 04:32 PM.
  #42  
Old 10-03-2017, 05:25 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 72,157
You might look into the Toronto actor who donated his skull to his theatre company, for inspiration.
  #43  
Old 10-03-2017, 05:36 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 11,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
You might look into the Toronto actor who donated his skull to his theatre company, for inspiration.
Oh yeah, I knew him, Horatio
  #44  
Old 10-03-2017, 06:50 PM
purplehearingaid purplehearingaid is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 1,673
I could be used to understand more about hearing lost from nerve damage and the effect of having objects throw at your head and being repeatedly hit on the same side of your head as a child everyday !
  #45  
Old 10-09-2017, 03:59 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
I've posted it here before ... but I made mutual wills with a friend of mine that the survivor of the two of is will make the other's skull into a drinking cup.
Well, if you've posted it before, the odds are that you've gotten this response before, but what the hell...
  #46  
Old 10-09-2017, 04:07 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 27,713
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbroome View Post
timely thread.
I just toured our local Coroner's office yesterday. That question came up. The Coroner has passed on several bodies to medical schools here and in neighboring states. If they know about the situation in advance they are quite cooperative.
Likewise with the organ donation folks. Those folks watch the same network the Coroner and Police use to keep each other informed about the status of cases. They swoop in whenever a likely candidate shows up on the net.

Interesting tour.
Ooh, didn't see this one first time around! I'd like my organs to be harvested for donation, THEN have what's left be used as a med school cadaver. When the student opens me up, he'd find a bunch of papers marked "IOU," like in this scene.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:42 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017