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Old 09-11-2017, 02:09 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Is a Yorkshire pudding like a Roll? And why do they call it a pudding?

I used to imagine a Yorkshire pudding like this.
https://goo.gl/images/JTEQGm

Then the internet came along.
I began to understand it's a bread. I still have no idea why you'd call bread a pudding.

Wiki says it served with roast dinners. The photo provided looks exactly like my roast dinner with yeast Rolls. We buy the brown & serve rolls and use it to sop up the delicious juice from the roast beef.

So is a Yorkshire pudding a dinner roll?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yorkshire_pudding

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-11-2017 at 02:11 PM.
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Old 09-11-2017, 02:15 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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All I know is, you can't have your pudding if you don't eat your meat.


OP, pudding also means dessert sometimes too. Mind-blowing.
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Old 09-11-2017, 02:23 PM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
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Yorkshire puddings are very similar to what we americans would call a popover, though I think it's also very common to make them in tins or pans as opposed to more of a single-serving item.

Last edited by Inner Stickler; 09-11-2017 at 02:25 PM.
  #4  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:32 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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It is a savory popover, not yeasted, made from what is more like pancake batter. Traditionally made with the rendered fat and drippings from the Sunday roast to eke out the last little bits.

I mean, you linked to wikipedia, which explains it pretty thoroughly.

In modern British usage, "pudding" nowadays is pretty much a synonym for "dessert", but in olden times it could also refer to savory items. This is an example of such a fossilized usage to refer to a savory pudding.

Last edited by Lemur866; 09-11-2017 at 02:34 PM.
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Old 09-11-2017, 02:38 PM
scruffycat scruffycat is offline
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Pudding is one of those words which seems to have changed over time. Originally it denoted a savoury dish I think, Yorkshire pudding and Black pudding are examples that have kept the original meaning. I'm not sure why or when it came to denote sweet dishes though. It can still be taken to mean both in the UK, perhaps not so much in the US?
  #6  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:44 PM
casdave casdave is offline
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You missed out steak and kidney pudding.

Puddings can be sweet or savoury
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Old 09-11-2017, 02:47 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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It seems like they vary a lot.

This looks like rolls on the plate.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...y.Roast-01.jpg

But here, I can see why it's a savory pudding. That looks so good.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...irePudding.jpg

I love stew with crackers or bread. I bake cornbread and crumble it into my beef veg soup a couple times a month. It's a great and low cost meal.

I think I'd like Yorkshire pudding.

Last edited by aceplace57; 09-11-2017 at 02:50 PM.
  #8  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:54 PM
Baron Greenback Baron Greenback is offline
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Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post

I think I'd like Yorkshire pudding.
I reckon you would - they are great at soaking up gravy etc.
  #9  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:01 PM
Sage Rat Sage Rat is offline
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Based on watching a number of 18th century cooking videos on YouTube, I get the impression that back in that time a "pudding" was basically anything you put in a bag and boil the hell out of for a while.

E.g.: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pudding_cloth

In essence, I think this was sort of like an early version of canning. You put stuff in a container and boil it so that the insides stay fresh. In the case of puddings, usually there was a bread layer surrounding the guts, and the cloth held it together until the shell hardened. The only differences are that you can't eat the can, but the can does a better job of making the food last.

Once refrigeration and preservatives came along, there was no more need to use this method, so a lot of the recipes ended up losing the outside skin and the sweet branch took on the name "pudding" as a class of food, while some of the recipes that were still made with a pudding cloth kept the word in their names.

Last edited by Sage Rat; 09-11-2017 at 03:06 PM.
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:10 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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I reckon you would - they are great at soaking up gravy etc.
Yes, Yorkshire pudding and brown gravy is a meal in itself, even without the roast beef. To make the pudding, you have to pour the batter into a muffin tin liberally greased with beef fat, and stick it in the oven until the batter puffs and turns golden brown. What you end up with is basically thick pancakes in the form of hollow rolls. You then cut or tear them into bitesized chunks that you skewer along with the meat and then dredge through the gravy.

OMG, this is soooooooo good! Throw in some spuds roasted in beef fat and a plate of raw oysters for starters, and you're livin' high on the hog (so to speak)!
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:29 PM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
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Based on watching a number of 18th century cooking videos on YouTube
Wow. YouTube's been around longer than I thought!
  #12  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:30 PM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is online now
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And now I want Yorkshire pudding.
  #13  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:34 PM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is online now
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To the OP, no it is nothing like a bread, nothing like a dinner roll.

The best comparison is to a big pancake but oven cooked in a very hot oven so that you get a nice big rise and some crispy bits to go with a chewy pancake-type bottom.
Done in beef dripping and served with roast potatoes and gravy it forms the basis of the classic british sunday roast dinner.
You can do it in shallow muffin tins or as a big slab in a rectangular roasting tin or anything in between, the shape is irrelevant as the main function is as a gravy delivery device.

The other great yorkshire pudding recipe is to chuck some good quality pork sausage in the bottom of the tin, pour the batter on top and cook in the same way. Toad-in-the-hole.
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:59 PM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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My MIL (a native of Canada) still makes Yorkshire pudding from the pan drippings. She doesn't make it in muffin tins, though. I'm pretty sure she just makes the batter and then pours it into the roast drip pan and puts it back in the oven to bake.
  #15  
Old 09-11-2017, 04:12 PM
MrDibble MrDibble is online now
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
You then cut or tear them into bitesized chunks that you skewer along with the meat and then dredge through the gravy.
No, you fill the hollow centres with gravy first.
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:12 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I love 'em. I like to make the little ones in muffin tins, as they have a higher proportion of crispy bits to chewy, tender bits. If you're making a juicy prime rib for dinner, you pour the au jus into the little dips in the tops of each pud.

The pictures linked to upthread give me an idea. The next time I make a steak and mushroom pie (like in winter, when it's not so freaking hot), I'll contrive to somehow top it with little individual Yorkshire puds instead of topping it with a pastry crust. Hmm, I wonder how I'll swing this.
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:15 PM
Cyros Cyros is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skammer View Post
My MIL (a native of Canada) still makes Yorkshire pudding from the pan drippings. She doesn't make it in muffin tins, though. I'm pretty sure she just makes the batter and then pours it into the roast drip pan and puts it back in the oven to bake.
The trouble with doing it that way is that, like potato chips, it ends up being a single serving regardless of how it is cooked. My family is much happier when I take one or two (ok, 6) of the 12 individual servings from the muffin tin vs the one individual serving from the roast tray.
  #18  
Old 09-21-2017, 11:47 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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All I know is, you can't have your pudding if you don't eat your meat.
D'oh! So that's what I've been doing wrong. All this time I've been beating my meat. No wonder I have no pudding.
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Old 09-22-2017, 06:36 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is offline
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Originally Posted by Maus Magill View Post
And now I want Yorkshire pudding.
Easily made. You just have to remember to get the oven and the cooking dish (and the cooking fat) as hot as can be before you put the batter in.

If you part-fry (brown) some sausages first, you can put those in before pouring the batter over it, and then you'll have toad in the hole.
  #20  
Old 09-22-2017, 07:21 AM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
This looks like rolls on the plate.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...y.Roast-01.jpg
Not really, not even in the tiny little picture you've got. Yorkshire puddings are hollow, with a texture almost wholly unlike bread.
  #21  
Old 09-22-2017, 08:17 AM
ivylass ivylass is online now
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I know you can buy mixes, but I've made them from scratch in muffin tins and they are so good.

The secret is since roast beef was served only at Sunday dinner, you had to eat the pudding before the meat...the trick being to fill up on the pudding so there would be more roast beef left over.
  #22  
Old 09-22-2017, 09:00 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Yorkshire pudding is very much like a pudding if made right. It shouldn't be dry, it should be moist, more firm than pudding, but not bread like. Popovers are smaller and made in muffin tins and usually end up much drier than Yorkshire. It's a tricky dish to make without overcooking, a hot oven and pan are needed to get it to rise properly, but then wait too long and it turns into a bread.
  #23  
Old 09-22-2017, 09:21 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Girls and boys, come out to play,
The moon doth shine as bright as day;
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And come with your playfellows into the street.
Come with a whoop, come with a call,
Come with a good will or not at all.
Up the ladder and down the wall,
A halfpenny roll will serve us all.
You find milk, and I'll find flour,
And we'll have a pudding in half an hour.
  #24  
Old 09-22-2017, 09:37 AM
silenus silenus is online now
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Easily made. You just have to remember to get the oven and the cooking dish (and the cooking fat) as hot as can be before you put the batter in.
This is the essential part. Hot cooking vessel. And don't peek at them while they cook.
  #25  
Old 09-22-2017, 09:45 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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This is the essential part. Hot cooking vessel. And don't peek at them while they cook.
I like Jamie Oliver's recipe for them. (The first time I came across that video, I did not at all recognize Jamie Oliver. I guess I just hadn't seen him for a number of years since his Naked Chef days.)
  #26  
Old 09-22-2017, 10:16 AM
Springtime for Spacers Springtime for Spacers is offline
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Officially they should be evenly puffed up and crispy but i prefer mine to have a puffed up edge and a squishy bottom. It's the same batter as in Toad in The Hole. There sausages are heated in oil before the batter is poured in and cooked.

I lost my British Cook credentials recently. I got the proportions of flour to liquid in the batter wrong and ended up with sausages in egg custard. I was so ashamed
  #27  
Old 09-22-2017, 10:45 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is online now
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Since this has been revived, I'm going to pick a nit that's nagging me
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Originally Posted by teela brown View Post
you pour the au jus
Aaargh. No, you pour the jus. Just jus.
  #28  
Old 09-22-2017, 10:52 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
Since this has been revived, I'm going to pick a nit that's nagging me
Aaargh. No, you pour the jus. Just jus.
In American English, "au jus" is pretty much idiomatic. You might not like it; it may not be linguistically "pure," but language is language, and that's the direction it turned here. You'll even see and hear constructions like "with au jus gravy" which I'm sure will set your ears on fire.

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-22-2017 at 10:54 AM.
  #29  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:30 AM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
Since this has been revived, I'm going to pick a nit that's nagging me
Aaargh. No, you pour the jus. Just jus.
Might as well complain about entering your PIN number at the ATM machine. It's a fossilized usage.
  #30  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:35 AM
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I'm English and have eaten many, many Yorkshire puddings. Let me summarise my experience.

Yes, it's an odd name (they are served with the main course, not as a dessert.)
They are shaped like a flat bottomed circular bowl, designed to hold e.g. gravy.
They are made of batter.

A traditional Sunday roast dinner always includes them; together with:

- roast meat
- roast potatoes
- vegetable (often carrots, cabbage and parsnips)
- gravy (safely stored in the Yorkshire pudding)

I have also eaten a main course of just huge (almost plate-sized) Yorkshire puddings filled with mince, vegetables and gravy. Yum!
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  #31  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:36 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
In American English, "au jus" is pretty much idiomatic. You might not like it; it may not be linguistically "pure," but language is language, and that's the direction it turned here. You'll even see and hear constructions like "with au jus gravy" which I'm sure will set your ears on fire.
Just for fun, here's a picture of "au jus gravy" that is sold in supermarkets.
  #32  
Old 09-22-2017, 12:53 PM
MrDibble MrDibble is online now
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
In American English, "au jus" is pretty much idiomatic. You might not like it; it may not be linguistically "pure," but language is language, and that's the direction it turned here. You'll even see and hear constructions like "with au jus gravy" which I'm sure will set your ears on fire.
Just because it's common, doesn't mean it should be acceptable. Individuals can be taught better even if hoi polloi are idiots.

You'll note, I didn't say "the hoi polloi", either.
  #33  
Old 09-22-2017, 01:02 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Yes, I noticed your wit before you had to explain it. Hoi polloi without the definite article in English grates on me and sounds completely unnatural.

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-22-2017 at 01:04 PM.
  #34  
Old 09-22-2017, 01:15 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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JYou'll note, I didn't say "the hoi polloi", either.
I'll contemplate this as I commute on the 5.
  #35  
Old 09-22-2017, 02:23 PM
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YORKSHIRE PUDDING

Let's call Yorkshire pudding
A fortunate blunder;
It's sort of popover
That tripped and popped under.

-Ogden Nash
  #36  
Old 09-22-2017, 03:21 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
In American English, "au jus" is pretty much idiomatic. You might not like it; it may not be linguistically "pure," but language is language, and that's the direction it turned here. You'll even see and hear constructions like "with au jus gravy" which I'm sure will set your ears on fire.
I told my kids it was pronounced "ow juice". I got one of those looks when the older one started taking French in Middle School.
  #37  
Old 09-22-2017, 04:35 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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I lost my British Cook credentials recently. I got the proportions of flour to liquid in the batter wrong and ended up with sausages in egg custard. I was so ashamed
Yum - sausages in egg custard.
  #38  
Old 09-22-2017, 06:25 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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I just called my local English restaurant and pub (in the US midwest) to ask if they ever had Yorkshire pudding on the menu. I was told they did not, but staff person did read off the list of all their dessert offerings. She seemed to think I wanted something sweet. When I told her Yorkshire pudding was savory, she just seemed confused.

They do offer a decent Scotch egg there, along with fair Fish & Chips and Shepherd's pie. Also some curries, that are almost, yet not completely unlike actual Indian food. But they also offer poutine and steak Tartare, which I never considered traditional English food. <<sigh>>

I wants me some Yorkshire Pudding sooooo bad right now.
  #39  
Old 09-22-2017, 06:26 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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No, not a roll. The only thing I can think to compare it to is egg custard, but that's not really accurate either.
  #40  
Old 09-22-2017, 07:28 PM
Springtime for Spacers Springtime for Spacers is offline
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Yum - sausages in egg custard.
I extracted the poor sausages and ate them with the veg. Definitely not my best meal.
  #41  
Old 09-22-2017, 07:36 PM
Springtime for Spacers Springtime for Spacers is offline
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
I just called my local English restaurant and pub (in the US midwest) to ask if they ever had Yorkshire pudding on the menu. I was told they did not, but staff person did read off the list of all their dessert offerings. She seemed to think I wanted something sweet. When I told her Yorkshire pudding was savory, she just seemed confused.

They do offer a decent Scotch egg there, along with fair Fish & Chips and Shepherd's pie. Also some curries, that are almost, yet not completely unlike actual Indian food. But they also offer poutine and steak Tartare, which I never considered traditional English food. <<sigh>>

I wants me some Yorkshire Pudding sooooo bad right now.
Yorkshire pudding is pretty nice with jam, which sort of makes it a dessert.
  #42  
Old 09-22-2017, 07:44 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Originally Posted by scruffycat View Post
Pudding is one of those words which seems to have changed over time. Originally it denoted a savoury dish I think, Yorkshire pudding and Black pudding are examples that have kept the original meaning. I'm not sure why or when it came to denote sweet dishes though. It can still be taken to mean both in the UK, perhaps not so much in the US?
In the US, pudding is a specific dessert, a soft, creamy, custard-y, sweet thing eaten with a spoon. You get the idea if you know that Jello makes a "pudding and pie filling." IOW, pudding is like a non-fruit pie filling, e.g., vanilla, chocolate, coconut, lemon etc.

Yorkshire pudding is similar to the pancake known as a Dutch baby. You mix eggs, milk, a small amount of flour and put into a VERY hot pan swimming in butter. The Yorkshire pudding would have used the hot fat in the pan left from roasting beef.

You can make a Dutch baby of any size depending on the amount of ingredients and size of pan, and it can be sweet or savory. I heat up my 6-inch cast iron skillet in the oven and make one just for me. Yum!
  #43  
Old 09-22-2017, 10:35 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
In the US, pudding is a specific dessert, a soft, creamy, custard-y, sweet thing eaten with a spoon. You get the idea if you know that Jello makes a "pudding and pie filling." IOW, pudding is like a non-fruit pie filling, e.g., vanilla, chocolate, coconut, lemon etc.
Tapioca pudding is the best.

http://vegalicious.recipes/wp-conten...dding-0011.jpg

Gotta use whole milk, fresh eggs, and real vanilla, though.
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