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Old 10-04-2017, 12:51 PM
2Bits 2Bits is offline
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Why do we humans like carbonation?

Is there anyway to describe the appeal? Do other animals (your dog, say) respond favorably to it? It seems pretty "unnatural."

Last edited by 2Bits; 10-04-2017 at 12:53 PM.
  #2  
Old 10-04-2017, 01:03 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Our African Grey will drink apple juice, orange juice, water, hot chocolate, grape juice, cranberry juice, and a few other juices from my cup. He does not like any carbonated liquids. They actually piss him off; he'll try to forcefully spill them.

I have a sodastream. Carbonated water is my favorite non-alcoholic drink.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:22 PM
D18 D18 is offline
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It stimulates our taste buds in a delightful manner!
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:24 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is online now
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Pain. The CO2 in the bubbles hurts just slightly, which affects the taste.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:37 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Theme song for the thread.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:54 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Bits View Post
... It seems pretty "unnatural."
Just to comment on this, have had natural carbonated water right out of the well spring in the earth, so yes it is natural, but overall rare. Most of what you get is artificial and contains more carbonation then what i tasted out of the ground, but natural stuff can be carbonated and form bubbles.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:10 PM
gnoitall gnoitall is offline
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Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
Just to comment on this, have had natural carbonated water right out of the well spring in the earth, so yes it is natural, but overall rare. Most of what you get is artificial and contains more carbonation then what i tasted out of the ground, but natural stuff can be carbonated and form bubbles.
And Mentos-and-Coke-like geysers. (Except not brown.)
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:16 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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And Mentos-and-Coke-like geysers. (Except not brown.)
Bring your own Scotch.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:23 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Pain. The CO2 in the bubbles hurts just slightly, which affects the taste.
Humans are so weird.

Capsaicin causes a painful burning sensation in mammals and certain plants (especially fruit-bearing ones like peppers) evolved to contain the chemical so that non-mammalian creatures like birds will spread the seeds further than some wolf or rat that might just poop out the seeds 5 yards away.

Then along comes a human who takes a bite, turns red, screams in pain, rinses his mouth out then says, “Delicious, give me more!”

We are such masochists.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:44 PM
cochrane cochrane is online now
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If you drink enough of it, you begin to like it.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:48 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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Then along comes a human who takes a bite, turns red, screams in pain, rinses his mouth out then says, “Delicious, give me more!”
Wasn't pepper originally used to make spoiled food palatable?
I guess some people began to like the taste.
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Old 10-04-2017, 04:20 PM
gregorio gregorio is offline
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Gets us drunker faster. Maybe not the reason, but a reason.

http://thehealthydrinker.com/2011/03...-drunk-faster/
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Old 10-04-2017, 05:50 PM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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Bring your own Scotch.
I tried to make a bourbon and soda out of some naturally carbonated water that I collected seeping out of the ground in a bay at low tide. The moment the alcohol hit the water it turned a dark purple almost black color. I still drank it and it still got me drunk but does anyone know what minerals/chemical would turn a liquid black when mixed with alcohol.
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Old 10-04-2017, 07:03 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
Wasn't pepper originally used to make spoiled food palatable?.
No, because:

A) originally spices were very expensive. Those who could afford spices could afford fresh meat.

B) It doesn't work Spiced rotten meat still tastes rotten.
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Old 10-04-2017, 07:07 PM
Pork Rind Pork Rind is offline
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I have a sodastream. Carbonated water is my favorite non-alcoholic drink.
My wife and I are so addicted that we gave up the Sodastream and bought a CO2 tank and the adapter to pressurize used 2 liter bottles.

When I cut myself, I half expect my blood to be fizzy.
  #16  
Old 10-04-2017, 07:57 PM
gazpacho gazpacho is offline
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My wife and I are so addicted that we gave up the Sodastream and bought a CO2 tank and the adapter to pressurize used 2 liter bottles.

When I cut myself, I half expect my blood to be fizzy.
Do you still remember what parts you got to do this? I have one of those isi 1 liter soda siphons. They cost about $.60 a liter which is pretty expensive for few grams of CO2.
  #17  
Old 10-04-2017, 08:25 PM
Pork Rind Pork Rind is offline
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Here's a pre-configured set up like mine.

You might be able to buy the parts cheaper. Almost certainly your local home brew supply store will have all this if you don’t want to mail order. The cost upfront is not significant, but the refills on that 5 pound bottle will only run in the neighborhood of 10 bucks. And that should get you 175 to 200 fizzed 2L bottles.

I recommend the metal caps over the plastic. The plastic ones can be hard to attach and detach from the filler in my experience.
  #18  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:49 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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Originally Posted by sitchensis View Post
I tried to make a bourbon and soda out of some naturally carbonated water that I collected seeping out of the ground in a bay at low tide. The moment the alcohol hit the water it turned a dark purple almost black color. I still drank it and it still got me drunk but does anyone know what minerals/chemical would turn a liquid black when mixed with alcohol.
Stick with branch water.
  #19  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:50 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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No, because:

A) originally spices were very expensive. Those who could afford spices could afford fresh meat.

B) It doesn't work Spiced rotten meat still tastes rotten.
Well, fuck junior high history class.
  #20  
Old 10-04-2017, 10:47 PM
sunstone sunstone is offline
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Humans and some other animals eat strange things with either pain potential or psychological effects....I think it is because we enjoy the novelty of different mental states.

Carbonation may mildly stimulate our pain receptors. Try chewing a new stick of wintergreen or mint gum and sipping a coke! Wow! You will understand the boundary of pain and pleasure!

However...

Black pepper is a completely different spice than chili peppers, which are the ones that burn the mouth.
Not to highjack the thread, but some additional info to clear any confusion regarding pepper. Neither of these are physco active

Black pepper is a form of fruit called a drupe, which can be seen in whole peppercorns. I cannot find references for the biological purpose of the chemical peperine. Black pepper is in the botanical family Piperaceae, and is native to India - but is now grown elsewhere, with Vietnam being the greatest producer

As noted by Atamasama, Chili peppers have capsaicin is an adaption to favor birds eating the fruit and scattering the seeds widely after they go through the digestive tract. Chili peppers are native to the Americas, where they were domesticated by the original natives. They range from bell peppers to Scotch Bonnets (mild to wildly hot), and now form part of the worldwide cuisine.
  #21  
Old 10-05-2017, 07:00 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pork Rind View Post
Here's a pre-configured set up like mine.

You might be able to buy the parts cheaper. Almost certainly your local home brew supply store will have all this if you don’t want to mail order. The cost upfront is not significant, but the refills on that 5 pound bottle will only run in the neighborhood of 10 bucks. And that should get you 175 to 200 fizzed 2L bottles.

I recommend the metal caps over the plastic. The plastic ones can be hard to attach and detach from the filler in my experience.
I got tired of buying sodastream's proprietary threaded CO2 bottles, so I bought an adapter and use paintball CO2 bottles. If I ever buy/make a kegerator for beer, I'll probably step up to a system like yours.
  #22  
Old 10-05-2017, 07:45 AM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
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I always hated fizz as a child. I was infamous at school actually as 'that kid who asks for milk at parties'. I got over it later.

So I wonder if fizz is, like beer (but less so) one of those acquired tastes that society guides you into - and animals, lacking peer group pressure, miss out on.
  #23  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:04 AM
anomalous1 anomalous1 is offline
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Maybe because it adds a little more character to the beverage, a 'mouth feel' that is desirable in comparison to drinking something flat.
  #24  
Old 10-05-2017, 10:17 AM
Pork Rind Pork Rind is offline
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The cost upfront is not significant, but the refills on that 5 pound bottle will only run in the neighborhood of 10 bucks.
the cost is not insignificant...
  #25  
Old 10-05-2017, 10:24 AM
yabob yabob is offline
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This thread made me curious about something. We have "nitro beers" like canned Guinness that are infused with nitrogen instead of CO2 (originally intended to simulate a hand pulled pint). Smaller bubbles, "creamier" mouthfeel, etc. Can you have "nitro" sodas? Apparently so. There's a company out there that sells a gadget to nitrogenate beers:

https://nitrobrew.com/

You'll note that they also say that you can use it on other beverages as well. I suppose the appeal of a fizzy nitrogenated drink is similar to carbonated, although they have less "bite" (no carbonic acid, which I suppose may allow you to enjoy fizzy beverages if you can't tolerate the acidic content in sodas). Now I wonder how your dog would like nitrogenated stuff. Or your parrot.

Last edited by yabob; 10-05-2017 at 10:26 AM.
  #26  
Old 10-05-2017, 11:33 AM
John Bredin John Bredin is offline
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You'll note that they also say that you can use it on other beverages as well.
Starbucks has been selling nitro coffee for some time now. Haven't tried it yet, but the taps look like beer taps and are almost always right next to the drink-pickup counter.
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Old 10-05-2017, 12:41 PM
ZipperJJ ZipperJJ is offline
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I've had fruit that has gone bad many times, and something like a cantaloupe tastes/feels like it is carbonated or "fizzy" when it's gone off.

I wonder if this is why animals (especially fruit eaters like kayaker's bird) are put off by carbonation. They take the crazy mouth feel as a clue that something is not right.
  #28  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:24 PM
gazpacho gazpacho is offline
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Starbucks has been selling nitro coffee for some time now. Haven't tried it yet, but the taps look like beer taps and are almost always right next to the drink-pickup counter.
I am pretty sure the Starbucks nitro coffee is not carbonated. I know the nitro coffee sold by the cafe near me is not.

Last edited by gazpacho; 10-05-2017 at 01:25 PM.
  #29  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:13 PM
John Bredin John Bredin is offline
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I am pretty sure the Starbucks nitro coffee is not carbonated. I know the nitro coffee sold by the cafe near me is not.
It's not carbonated with big soda-style bubbles but finer foam. "Cascading, velvety crema" as Starbucks puts it. It looks like Guinness, in fact. Pics.
  #30  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:15 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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I am pretty sure the Starbucks nitro coffee is not carbonated.
Of course, by definition.
  #31  
Old 10-05-2017, 05:04 PM
yabob yabob is offline
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What might be fairly interesting is nitroing root beer, cream soda or orange cream soda. One of those nitrobrew kits costs $355 with compressor. I'm not that curious.
  #32  
Old 10-05-2017, 05:32 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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A buddy tried some nitro beer once. He’d bought a can on a whim. He said it didn’t fizz as much and seemed to go flat much faster than carbonated beer.
  #33  
Old 10-06-2017, 08:08 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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DesertRoomie has a habit of opening cans of soda (mostly Coca Cola) and them not drinking them. When we had horses, one in particular loved it when I'd feed him one of the warm cans. He preferred the flat ones. When he got one that still had some carbonation he'd shake his head and do funny things with his tongue but still drank it down. I never tried a freshly-opened warm can.
  #34  
Old 10-06-2017, 03:51 PM
Chicken Fingers Chicken Fingers is offline
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I agree with the pain theory. I like anything so carbonated it hurts.
  #35  
Old 10-06-2017, 09:18 PM
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Burping after drinking a lot of plain seltzer is one of life's greatest pleasures.
  #36  
Old 10-07-2017, 08:21 PM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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Carbonation not only changes the mouth feel. It also changes the flavor. Carbon dioxide dissolved in water forms carbonic acid, which gives a somewhat tart taste. A soda that's gone flat tastes "blah" because it's not as acidic.

As for it being unnatural, so what? People do many things that aren't natural. Is it natural to cook our food? Is it natural to roast the seeds of an African plant, then grind them up and soak them in hot water to make a drink? Is it natural to use heat to extract the alcohol from fermented grain?
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  #37  
Old 10-08-2017, 02:40 AM
TheTuss TheTuss is offline
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Humans like carbonation because dissolving CO2 in water produces carbonic acid, and there are taste receptors on the human tongue that respond specifically to carbonic acid. The solubility of a gas in a liquid increases as the temperature of the liquid decreases. Significant mixing of gas and liquid must also occur for the gas to dissolve.

In primitive humans, the safest source of water was cold running water because it is less favorable for growth of microorganisms. Out in nature, cold running water contains the most CO2 and thus carbonic acid. So the human taste receptors that make carbonated water taste good helped survival, so we still have them today.
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