Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-30-2017, 02:51 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,404
I'm sorry I don't speak French, only English, could you help me?

I have encountered plenty of what I like to call French snobs, both in France and the French-English Canada provenience of Quebec. Also have been in Haiti though Creole has been declared it's own language before I went there and never had the snob attitude that I have experienced with others.

My current tactic is to get into my inner child, and when confronted with such bastards simply ask that above in a humble voice. Normally they respond well though not always.

What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
  #2  
Old 11-30-2017, 02:55 PM
manson1972 manson1972 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 5,153
I simply yell in English louder and louder until they understand me.
  #3  
Old 11-30-2017, 02:57 PM
Morgenstern Morgenstern is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 9,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
...

What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
I pit them.
__________________
Remember, pillage before burning.
  #4  
Old 11-30-2017, 02:58 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgenstern View Post
I pit them.
Does that work for getting what you want?
  #5  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:01 PM
running coach running coach is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 32,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
I order some sauteed asphalt in a wastepaper basket with a side of suit jackets.
  #6  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:07 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 10,416
Quote:
Originally Posted by manson1972 View Post
I simply yell in English louder and louder until they understand me.
As BJ Hunnicutt once said on "M*A*S*H": "Everyone understands English if you speak it LOUDLY and slooooooowly enough."
  #7  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:12 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Again, Titletown
Posts: 20,076
I've never had that problem in France, only occasionally in rural Quebec. My response has been to learn better French.
  #8  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:17 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 10,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by manson1972 View Post
I simply yell in English louder and louder until they understand me.
This. I will gladly play the "Vulgar American Oaf Who Thinks Yelling Magically Makes People Understand English" to people who deserve it.

Then again, I've encountered very few Frenchmen in and around Washington, DC; in fact I'm fairly certain I've never met one.
  #9  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:27 PM
Leaffan Leaffan is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 22,599
Learn to speak French. My God.

Would you expect someone from, say, rural Brazil to march into an English-speaking country and demand that you speak Portuguese?

Holy shit. I learned enough French in high school to get by in rural Quebec. I'm by no means fluent, and I can read way better than understand the spoken language, but that's MY problem, not theirs.
  #10  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:31 PM
DooWahDiddy DooWahDiddy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 2,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
I fart in their general direction.
  #11  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:38 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Learn to speak French. My God.

Would you expect someone from, say, rural Brazil to march into an English-speaking country and demand that you speak Portuguese?

Holy shit. I learned enough French in high school to get by in rural Quebec. I'm by no means fluent, and I can read way better than understand the spoken language, but that's MY problem, not theirs.
Wow you seem to be one of them (I intended this as more comic and not meaning it as a insult.)

But really attempting French is a cultural no-no. Fluent french or be apologetic about it is what I have learned. Opposite in Spain, try a Spanish word and get it wrong and it will be so appreciated that will be invited to a fiesta later that evening (which to them means party starting at 11 PM)

Last edited by kanicbird; 11-30-2017 at 03:39 PM.
  #12  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:47 PM
manson1972 manson1972 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 5,153
A more serious yet equally unhelpful answer: Once I was driving around France with some friends and we had to stop at a gas station. As usually, we asked the guy working at the station if he spoke English. His answer (in French, but we all got the gist of it): "Why would I speak English? We are in France"
  #13  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:48 PM
jasg jasg is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 4,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by DooWahDiddy View Post
I fart in their general direction.
Le Pétomane, is that you?
__________________
It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.
~ Jonathan Swift (1667 - 1745)
  #14  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:48 PM
Leaffan Leaffan is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 22,599
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
Wow you seem to be one of them ...
Is it even possible to be more insulting?
  #15  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:51 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Is it even possible to be more insulting?
You owe me a new keyboard
  #16  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:52 PM
manson1972 manson1972 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 5,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Is it even possible to be more insulting?
He could have said it in French.
  #17  
Old 11-30-2017, 03:56 PM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 36,773
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
But really attempting French is a cultural no-no. Fluent french or be apologetic about it is what I have learned. Opposite in Spain, try a Spanish word and get it wrong and it will be so appreciated that will be invited to a fiesta later that evening (which to them means party starting at 11 PM)
Out of curiosity, where in Spain have you been? Because I know a few areas where people can be absolute jerks about language, and I've encountered imbeciles laughing at someone else's choice of vocabulary or pronunciation in other places where that got them taken out back for a low-voiced and intense reading of The Book.

I've only encountered one Frenchman who was a jerk about my Rs, but he could have been the separated-at-birth twin of a Chilean I used to work with; both of them were complete JAQasses. There's a Belgian dude at work who's also a JAQass but so far he hasn't gotten on my French. Going to Quebec next year, hopefully the ratio of jerks to decent people will just be the usual.
__________________
Life ain't peaches and cream, but sometimes it's laughing your ass off when you have no ass. - WhyNot

Last edited by Nava; 11-30-2017 at 03:56 PM.
  #18  
Old 11-30-2017, 04:02 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Again, Titletown
Posts: 20,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
But really attempting French is a cultural no-no. Fluent french or be apologetic about it is what I have learned.
Sorry, but this is complete contrary to my experience. I've had many halting conversations in my pretty bad French both in Quebec and France. No one has ever expressed any problems with it, and they seemed happy to help me. A few switched to English without any issues when I was having too much trouble.

Perhaps your attitude is the problem, not your English?
  #19  
Old 11-30-2017, 04:03 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
Out of curiosity, where in Spain have you been? Because I know a few areas where people can be absolute jerks about language, and I've encountered imbeciles laughing at someone else's choice of vocabulary or pronunciation in other places where that got them taken out back for a low-voiced and intense reading of The Book.

I've only encountered one Frenchman who was a jerk about my Rs, but he could have been the separated-at-birth twin of a Chilean I used to work with; both of them were complete JAQasses. There's a Belgian dude at work who's also a JAQass but so far he hasn't gotten on my French. Going to Quebec next year, hopefully the ratio of jerks to decent people will just be the usual.
The French Way of El Camino De Santiago. Starting at St Jean Port a Prince in France 'just over the boarder', ending at the Atlantic Ocean at Muxia Spain. Some of that trip through the Bask 'area' which I was informed was not Spain. Also Madrid.

During that trip I encountered exactly one jerk about it who owned a bar, which received many negative reviews on Google for 1: that very reason 2: being a jerk,
  #20  
Old 11-30-2017, 04:08 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Sorry, but this is complete contrary to my experience. I've had many halting conversations in my pretty bad French both in Quebec and France. No one has ever expressed any problems with it, and they seemed happy to help me. A few switched to English without any issues when I was having too much trouble.

Perhaps your attitude is the problem, not your English?
Possibly I have been taught better to apologize for not speaking French then attempting it.
  #21  
Old 11-30-2017, 04:17 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 37,376
My encounters with French speakers in Canada and England were easily handled by saying "I'm an American". Their ability to understand and speak English was magically enhanced. In one case I was told it was OK because English is what Americans speak, in other cases I get the feeling they stooped to using English because they thought Americans were too stupid to understand anything else. Doesn't matter to me, it worked.
  #22  
Old 11-30-2017, 04:19 PM
cochrane cochrane is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 19,239
Let's face it, when ordering dinner in French, you really do need to learn how to say "un Royal avec du fromage."
  #23  
Old 11-30-2017, 05:15 PM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: South East England
Posts: 6,627
If you are bilingual then I assume you are bilingual for a purpose. The only reason you wouldn't use that additional capability is to be an arsehole. I've come across it in Belgium quite a few times. Speaking french in a flemish area can get you a total blank look even thought they understand you perfectly and speak french fluently.

Of course, if you only speak one language and you meet someone who only speaks one different language then you are both on a level playing field and are reduced to talking loudly and hand-gestures.

This seems relevant here.
__________________
I'm saving this space for the first good insult hurled my way
  #24  
Old 11-30-2017, 05:24 PM
EmilyG EmilyG is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Montreal
Posts: 7,899
I don't find the people in my area (Montreal, Quebec) rude. Though I do speak French.
__________________
"When life gives you music, you must dance, no matter how many left feet you have!" - a friend of mine
  #25  
Old 11-30-2017, 05:32 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Je suis Ikea.
Posts: 25,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
I'm sorry, I must be humour-impaired. Could you please explain why this is a funny thing to say?
  #26  
Old 11-30-2017, 06:14 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 38,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Sorry, but this is complete contrary to my experience. I've had many halting conversations in my pretty bad French both in Quebec and France. No one has ever expressed any problems with it, and they seemed happy to help me. A few switched to English without any issues when I was having too much trouble.

Perhaps your attitude is the problem, not your English?
Same here. I've traveled to France for business and pleasure more times than I can remember and never had a problem whether I spoke mostly English or after I learned passable French. In many cases, when I would start in with French, the local person would interrupt me to say "I speak English". I guess that could be considered snobbery, as Parisians are pretty partial to their brand of the language, whereas my training was Francophone (West Africa), and perhaps it was painful to their ears.
  #27  
Old 11-30-2017, 06:22 PM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,758
Quote:
Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
Let's face it, when ordering dinner in French, you really do need to learn how to say "un Royal avec du fromage."
I took French in high school and retained bits of it. Somewhere near the border coming back from Montréal I was trying to order McDonald's in French for my veggie friend. "Un numéro un avec...pas de viand..."

duh gigi, "sans viand" I thought to myself miles later. Of course the counterperson was bilingue so I don't know what I was thinking anyway!
  #28  
Old 11-30-2017, 06:34 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 81,074
I spent a lot of time in France and never had a problem. I tired to speak my rudimentary French, and when it didn't work, the other person would usually switch to English or we would muddle along. I don't know-- maybe I was being looked down upon and didn't notice. I would often lead off with "Pardon me, but I don't speak French" (in French), and go from there.

I've been to Canada quite a few times, but only for a few days in Quebec. In Montreal, everyone switched effortlessly back and forth between English and French. In Quebec City, it was a bit more difficult. I thought the people were pretty nice, but mostly I was just so amazed to that I could drive somewhere relatively close (we were living in Boston at the time) and feel like I was in Europe. We had a fantastic time!
  #29  
Old 11-30-2017, 06:38 PM
penultima thule penultima thule is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2,217
Quote them back a Latin phrase.

Si tacuisses, philosophus mansisses might be appropriate.

Sir Humphrey Appleby translated this as: "If you'd kept your mouth shut we might have thought you were clever."
__________________
When action grows unprofitable, gather information; when information grows unprofitable, sleep”. U.K. Le Guin
  #30  
Old 11-30-2017, 06:52 PM
Bill Door Bill Door is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 4,740
I took two years and two weeks of French in high school around 45 years ago and have traveled to both Quebec and France on both business and pleasure and never had any trouble with any language snobbery. Really, most of my attempts to speak French end up sounding like English with a bad French accent. Think Inspector Clouseau. In French speaking countries I usually look for a hotel near the library, because after "où est la bibliothèque" I've pretty much shot my wad.

I've been told that the Quebecois can be rude if they think you're a native Anglo-Québécois who refuses to speak French, but once they realize you're an American they think, "Bénisse votre cœur" and switch to English.
  #31  
Old 11-30-2017, 07:15 PM
Declan Declan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Barrie , Ontario
Posts: 5,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
I have encountered plenty of what I like to call French snobs, both in France and the French-English Canada provenience of Quebec. Also have been in Haiti though Creole has been declared it's own language before I went there and never had the snob attitude that I have experienced with others.

My current tactic is to get into my inner child, and when confronted with such bastards simply ask that above in a humble voice. Normally they respond well though not always.

What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
Use American money, regardless of your nationality for guaranteed results. English will vary depending on location. When I visited the Dominican Republic, I bumped into a fellow Canadian, who hailed from Montreal, and I regaled him with the surprise that Taxi Drivers spoke English. His repose was that everyone in Montreal spoke English, where as I challenged him to find a cab driver in Toronto that speaks English.

So yeah in Canada, know your location. Above a certain latitude you can expect French to be the dominant local language. Just hope the exchange rate is decent.
__________________
What would Bugs Bunny say
  #32  
Old 11-30-2017, 07:45 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 13,267
In the past four years, I've traveled in countries were at least 20 languages were spoken by the locals, from Japanese to Somali to Kyrgyz. In my life, probably well over 100. This whole conversation is basically irrelevant to the facts on the ground. If you are a passing visitor in a country where there is no realistic expectation that you know the local language, you look for one you have in common. If necessary, I can get by in Spanish, German or French, but it is rarely necessary.

Travelers who are native speakers of Dutch or Swedish or Polish or Arabic or Russian know that wherever they go, their passable English will be good enough, because it is a language known to so many of the locals they will encounter, as well as virtually all other travelers. The fact that we already know English fluently is a gift, not something that imposes an additional burden on us.

Last edited by jtur88; 11-30-2017 at 07:46 PM.
  #33  
Old 11-30-2017, 08:08 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 18,795
Learning the language certainly helps, but in a pinch you can just purse your lips and make faux-French gibberish sounds while taking drags from invisible cigarettes. They love that.
  #34  
Old 11-30-2017, 08:09 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Again, Titletown
Posts: 20,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
Possibly I have been taught better to apologize for not speaking French then attempting it.
This is wrong, and therefore your problem should go away.
  #35  
Old 11-30-2017, 09:41 PM
Penfeather Penfeather is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 3,304
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
Wow you seem to be one of them (I intended this as more comic and not meaning it as a insult.)

But really attempting French is a cultural no-no. Fluent french or be apologetic about it is what I have learned. Opposite in Spain, try a Spanish word and get it wrong and it will be so appreciated that will be invited to a fiesta later that evening (which to them means party starting at 11 PM)
Rubbish. I got by fine in France with the French I learnt when I was 14.
  #36  
Old 11-30-2017, 10:02 PM
wolfpup wolfpup is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 7,587
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyG View Post
I don't find the people in my area (Montreal, Quebec) rude. Though I do speak French.
As you well know, Montreal is unusual in that it's extremely cosmopolitan and its residents almost universally bilingual, at least to some extent. Of course there jerks everywhere and nice people everywhere, but as a generalization you're more likely to run into anti-English sentiment in Quebec outside Montreal. It exists to a degree in France, too, in both cases a combination of Gallic culture and linguistic pride with the somewhat substantiated fear that it's all being impinged upon by the increasing dominance of English. This is especially true in Quebec where they view themselves as a besieged fortress in an English-dominated continent. Note that both Quebec and France have various governmental agencies set up for the protection of the French language, sort of the way that other places have child welfare agencies.
  #37  
Old 11-30-2017, 10:16 PM
Declan Declan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Barrie , Ontario
Posts: 5,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
I have encountered plenty of what I like to call French snobs, both in France and the French-English Canada provenience of Quebec. Also have been in Haiti though Creole has been declared it's own language before I went there and never had the snob attitude that I have experienced with others.

My current tactic is to get into my inner child, and when confronted with such bastards simply ask that above in a humble voice. Normally they respond well though not always.

What is your tactic with dealing with French snobbery?
Oh yeah, almost forgot. Throw in the word Tabernac every three or four words and yall be fine.
__________________
What would Bugs Bunny say
  #38  
Old 12-01-2017, 01:21 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Je suis Ikea.
Posts: 25,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
As you well know, Montreal is unusual in that it's extremely cosmopolitan and its residents almost universally bilingual, at least to some extent. Of course there jerks everywhere and nice people everywhere, but as a generalization you're more likely to run into anti-English sentiment in Quebec outside Montreal.
That doesn't match my experience at all. In Montreal, certainly in stores, they're "switchers" - the moment they hear an anglo accent, they switch to English. But in Quebec City, they smiled encouragingly when they heard French with an anglo accent.

Similar in France.

I've never run into Québécois or French who would rather you speak English than English-accented French, as described by the OP.

Last edited by Northern Piper; 12-01-2017 at 01:21 AM.
  #39  
Old 12-01-2017, 01:53 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 7,587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
That doesn't match my experience at all. In Montreal, certainly in stores, they're "switchers" - the moment they hear an anglo accent, they switch to English. But in Quebec City, they smiled encouragingly when they heard French with an anglo accent.

Similar in France.

I've never run into Québécois or French who would rather you speak English than English-accented French, as described by the OP.
Actually, I'm not sure what the OP was saying, other than "French are snobs". I was really just agreeing with EmilyG that Montreal, being cosmopolitan and highly bilingual, tends to be relatively more accommodating of English speakers than elsewhere in Quebec. I don't know about Quebec City personally but I imagine that being a major tourist destination, they are, too. I don't know what you're disagreeing with as I don't see than anything you said is at odds with anything I said.
  #40  
Old 12-01-2017, 02:21 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Je suis Ikea.
Posts: 25,295
you said that you're more likely to run into anti-English sentiment outside Montreal. That's not been my experience. I've never run into anti-English experience in Montreal, Quebec City or Baie Comeau.
  #41  
Old 12-01-2017, 03:12 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: London
Posts: 2,219
How do French-speakers cope with Anglophone "snobbery" when visiting an Anglophone country?
  #42  
Old 12-01-2017, 03:55 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 7,587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
you said that you're more likely to run into anti-English sentiment outside Montreal. That's not been my experience. I've never run into anti-English experience in Montreal, Quebec City or Baie Comeau.
Offhand I can't think of personal experience with anti-English discrimination either in Montreal or outside of it, but I haven't been there in more than a decade, and haven't lived there since dinosaurs roamed the earth. And when I did live there, I spoke French passably well. However, there's no denying that such discrimination exists, even in Montreal:
Montreal’s transit authority maintains that under the present language law, its ticket takers must operate in French, which lately has spurred complaints from passengers. Last year, the city of Montreal erected 60 English safety signs nearby Anglophone schools in an effort to slow passing vehicles. The Quebec Board of the French Language and its squad of inspectors ordered that they be taken down; a snowy drive through town revealed that all had been replaced by French notices.
http://world.time.com/2013/04/08/que...dian-province/

A friend told me that, one day, the cafe in his work, whose employees had always cheerfully spoken to him in English before, had suddenly changed all signs to French-only, and not a word of English was heard. “If I give them my order in English, they still respond in French,” he said.

... Until you have lived there, the depth of Québec’s language issues isn’t apparent ... There was a news story recently about a pregnant woman who was in a mild car accident and called 911 for assistance; instead of having individual dispatchers based on location (she was in Montreal), she was routed through a central point to a rural dispatcher who spoke only French. Despite the simplicity of her speech (“Help me. I am pregnant. I have been hit by a car.”), the operator refused to help her, and his supervisor backed him up, stating that “911 operators are not obligated to know English.”

... There’s the rub: it doesn’t actually matter how well you speak French. As long as you’re an anglophone, what matters is that you were born English-speaking. You could be perfectly fluent, perfectly bilingual, and it wouldn’t matter because at heart, you would still be an Anglo. Another friend said, “It’s really as close as able-bodied white people can get to knowing systemic discrimination. We’re lucky enough that we can just leave and go to another province to get away from it.”
https://matadornetwork.com/life/engl...heres-happens/
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickLondon View Post
How do French-speakers cope with Anglophone "snobbery" when visiting an Anglophone country?
I suppose when they encounter it, they cope with it the same way that English speakers cope with anti-English sentiment. The salient question is which form of discrimination is more prevalent. English speakers are not under the misapprehension that their language is under attack, and indeed English has cheerfully embraced the adoption of no end of foreign words, idioms, and expressions, which is part of what makes it such a richly expressive language. Whereas French seems to be not just under the influence of an intensely defensive paranoia, but also a rigid sense of purity, as if the introduction of a foreign term (especially English!), or too much English being spoken or exhibited in signage, will lead to some unspecified moral corruption or degradation of culture.
  #43  
Old 12-01-2017, 07:06 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 27,035
I've gotten along famously in the French speaking Caribbean by making an attempt. I've learned a few words and am self deprecating about my monolingual situation. I've found that once I show I'm willing to try, people do the same.
  #44  
Old 12-01-2017, 07:32 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: South East England
Posts: 6,627
I confess I'm a little timid when it comes trying new languages, I don't pick them up easily and stumble far more over the spoken than the written.

Still, having said that, I will always give it a go on the basis that it shows good manners to try, and it I rely on the good manners of the recipient to either help me out with patience, advice, gentle correction or even switching to a language that suits us both. I'm struggling to think of an occasion when this hasn't panned out in a polite and genial way.

Certainly when I'm on the receiving end and someone tries to speak english, however bad it is I cannot conceive of me being snobby about it.
I assume my faltering German sounds like a German speaker saying to me" Can you be for telling me to the supermarket?" However clunky and grammatically incorrect it is clear what is meant and I'd tailor my response to try and make sure that we are on the same page, Like a bad artist playing "pictionary" I'm sure we'll get there.
I certainly don't think "what a dick, if he can't be arsed to learn the language then I can't be arsed to help him"
__________________
I'm saving this space for the first good insult hurled my way
  #45  
Old 12-01-2017, 08:48 AM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 36,773
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
The French Way of El Camino De Santiago. Starting at St Jean Port a Prince in France 'just over the boarder', ending at the Atlantic Ocean at Muxia Spain. Some of that trip through the Bask 'area' which I was informed was not Spain. Also Madrid.
If your French pronunciation is like your spelling and jography... if it's the one on the bay it's St Jean de Luz and if it's the one at the foot of the vertical slope it's St Jean Pied-de-Port. Port-au-Prince is across the Atlantic, not in the French Basque country.
__________________
Life ain't peaches and cream, but sometimes it's laughing your ass off when you have no ass. - WhyNot

Last edited by Nava; 12-01-2017 at 08:48 AM.
  #46  
Old 12-01-2017, 09:55 AM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 18,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I've gotten along famously in the French speaking Caribbean by making an attempt. I've learned a few words and am self deprecating about my monolingual situation.
The mascara and bad Keith Richards accent probably don't hurt, either.
  #47  
Old 12-01-2017, 10:14 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 27,035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinyl Turnip View Post
The mascara and bad Keith Richards accent probably don't hurt, either.
Is there a good Keith Richards accent?
  #48  
Old 12-01-2017, 10:16 AM
John Mace John Mace is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 81,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Novelty Bobble View Post
I assume my faltering German sounds like a German speaker saying to me" Can you be for telling me to the supermarket?" However clunky and grammatically incorrect it is clear what is meant and I'd tailor my response to try and make sure that we are on the same page, Like a bad artist playing "pictionary" I'm sure we'll get there.
I certainly don't think "what a dick, if he can't be arsed to learn the language then I can't be arsed to help him"
Supermarket? It be for going directly this street down and then left tuning upon encountering places where crows fly. Good luck!
  #49  
Old 12-01-2017, 05:50 PM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Declan View Post
Oh yeah, almost forgot. Throw in the word Tabernac every three or four words and yall be fine.
Yeah, I'm Catholic and having my friends sitting around in Montreal discussing the various profanities based on things I hold sacred was...not fun.
  #50  
Old 12-01-2017, 06:40 PM
orcenio orcenio is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,034
I go all "angryphone" on 'em. Learn to bastardize the Queen's speech like the rest of us!

Last edited by orcenio; 12-01-2017 at 06:40 PM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:43 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017