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  #1  
Old 06-21-2000, 08:12 PM
insider insider is offline
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Is it true that there are some people who have a brain disorder in which they can hear colors, taste sounds etc? What portion of the brain is affected by this abnormality?
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  #2  
Old 06-21-2000, 09:19 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is online now
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It's called "synesthesia." It's rare, but does occur from time to time. Those with it might sense a certain taste in their mouth when they say particular words, or see colors when they hear certain sounds.

I remember some newsmagazine show about 15 years ago interviewing a synesthee (i.e., someone with synesthesia). She thought such things were normal until she was talking with her girlfriends and commented about how nice a particular boy's name tasted.

I don't know much about the cause, however. Probably something to do with crossed wires.
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  #3  
Old 06-21-2000, 11:37 PM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Well, I wouldn't call it a DISORDER...

More like a "condition." Yes, it exists. Yes, it's pretty rare (how rare can be a matter of debate). I'm a synesthete. The first time I learned that it was an actual condition, I felt simultaneously amazed and vindicated. It had never occurred to me that it was anything more than a minor quirk which plenty of people had to have. On the other hand, while stunned that it was so unusual, I was euphoric that other people recognized the sensations.

Rather than detail too much here, I'll offer a pretty thorough and interesting article that's a good starting place on synesthesia. The roots of synesthesia are somewhat controversial.

Discover Magazine, December 1999 - Do You See What They See?

And I'll shamelessly plug the page I have about my form(s) of synesthesia. I've described a few things and also put a few links there, including a link to a friend's page that has links I don't.
synesthesia - the tiny cow
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Old 06-22-2000, 12:01 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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I always heard that the kind of brain damage hallucinogens caused could be at the root of synesthesia. Tiny cow, you are a truly good person for posting information online so 'normals' like me can wonder at how much we've been missing out on, and how different a person can be and still be a decent person. Stranger tricks have been played by abnormal brains, and I hope you can enjoy your special talent. I'd enjoy having a color experience whenever I heard J.S. Bach's "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring". BTW, if you want a good book on some of the strangest tricks played by deformed brains, read "The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales" by Oliver Sacks. It is a compassionate look (sometimes altogether too compassionate for a physician who is supposed to maintain 'distance' from his cases) at some people who have some very serious, yet not always really sad, disorders (some may make you cry, but most will just make you wonder). Interesting reading if you ever wonder how much damage a human brain can take and still be able to function as a human mind.
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  #5  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:12 AM
eggo eggo is offline
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tiny cow, i have to know, how does my name taste? (a play on the fact that it also happens to be a waffle)

eggo
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  #6  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:35 AM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Quote:
Derleth:
I always heard that the kind of brain damage hallucinogens caused could be at the root of synesthesia.
It's been reported that people taking LSD and the like can experience temporary synesthesia. Of course, the synesthesia wears off when the drug does. This fact, though, has led some of the researchers to believe that everyone, not just a select few, has the neural connections necessary for the condition to occur. The article I posted explains a bit of it. I've never heard of brain damage caused by hallucinogens bringing on synesthesia, though—or did you mean the temporary drug-induced kind?

Quote:
BTW, if you want a good book on some of the strangest tricks played by deformed brains, read "The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales" by Oliver Sacks.
I have the book, heh, and really like it. Thanks. One other book by Oliver Sacks that I own is The Island of the Colorblind.

Quote:
eggo:
tiny cow, i have to know, how does my name taste? (a play on the fact that it also happens to be a waffle)
Sorry, eggo, not very waffle-like. What I CAN tell you, though, is that I get your name as mostly white, solidly gelatinous, and round with some very pale blue and pale red tones. The type of synesthesia I have appears to also induce something like an image along with the colors (and sometimes, "feeling"). As you might guess, your name is a bit similar to "egg."

I have to admit that when I describe something like this, I'm waiting for someone to insist, "You're making this all up."
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  #7  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:45 AM
eggo eggo is offline
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Quote:
Quote:
eggo:
tiny cow, i have to know, how does my name taste? (a play on the fact that it also happens to be a waffle)
Sorry, eggo, not very waffle-like.
good, i've been trying to disassociate myself from that damn company for the longest time.
Quote:
What I CAN tell you, though, is that I get your name as mostly white, solidly gelatinous, and round with some very pale blue and pale red tones. The type of synesthesia I have appears to also induce something like an image along with the colors (and sometimes, "feeling"). As you might guess, your name is a bit similar to "egg."
ok, that is--by far the coolest thing i've ever heard.

your truly,
mostly white, solidly gelatinous, and round with some very pale blue and pale red tones
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  #8  
Old 06-22-2000, 01:52 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Quote:
What I CAN tell you, though, is that I get your name as mostly white, solidly gelatinous, and round with some very pale blue and pale red tones.
Amazing. It is rare for me to be amazed at a talent, as I have seen so many people with odd ones, but yours is surpassingly interesting. How do you like my name, if I may be so bold as to ask? It has no obvious connection to food (at least no food I've ever heard of) or other sensations (again, AFAIK). Would you enlighten me as to what sensations my nom de plume conjures up?
Quote:
I've never heard of brain damage caused by hallucinogens bringing on synesthesia, though—or did you mean the temporary drug-induced kind?
I heard, from sources that might not be reliable, that brain damage caused by repeated usage of LSD and other drugs of that type would cause synesthesia permanently. Maybe I have been misinformed, perhaps I just garbled what I did read into what I typed. My memory is far from perfect.
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  #9  
Old 06-22-2000, 02:15 AM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Thanks, Derleth. I would hesitate to call it a talent, though—I just call it a quirk that has been with me as long as I can remember.

Your username's most prominent color is green. That's because I see your capital D as green. You also have some dark purple-maroons, a brown and some dark orange, though (which, incidentally, made me think after looking at the colors that if you had more green, you could use your name to draw a picture of a tree). The e's that were a very pale blue in eggo's name are pale enough in your name that I would say they're white. The image that I have, though, is pretty abstract and the best I can do at the moment is to say that it's like a flat, long (like a column)rectangular prism.

I do have to say that synesthetes, generally speaking, don't have all forms of synesthesia, nor do they perceive the same things (someone else may see your name as silver or yellow). In Richard Cytowic's book The Man Who Tasted Shapes, his subject and friend, a man named Michael, felt smooth columns when tasting mint, if I recall correctly. For me, though, tasting mint doesn't bring about any similar reactions.
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  #10  
Old 06-22-2000, 02:22 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Thank you. I like the colors brown and green, and I also happen to enjoy wooded places. Neat coincidence, eh? In any case, I'm not surprised that people with synesthesia have highly individual cases that fit a certain general description. The brain works in odd ways, and no two are exactly alike. Thank you for the book reference. I think I'll buy it if I see it.
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If you don't stop to analyze the snot spray, you are missing that which is best in life. - Miller
I'm not sure why this is, but I actually find this idea grosser than cannibalism. - Excalibre, after reading one of my surefire million-seller business plans.
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  #11  
Old 06-22-2000, 04:04 AM
Sofis Sofis is offline
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I'm sensing possibilities for a good .sig here. I would very much appriciate it if you told me what my name is like, tiny cow.
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  #12  
Old 06-22-2000, 05:59 AM
Vasmosn Vasmosn is offline
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It is interesting to learn about this condition but I believe, because of personal experience that it may be brought about in certain situations. I remember when I was in basic training, I slept on the top bunk. One morning, after having been up probably 44 of the previous 48 hours, when our drill sergeant came in to wake us, I HEARD the lights come on! It was a sound like a pillow exploding. The sound was so real that I had to look around to see what had happened and it took me a few minutes to realize that it was nothing more than the lights and that no one else had "heard" it! So maybe stress or sleep deprivation can activate the part of the brain that allows such miracles?
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Old 06-22-2000, 11:51 AM
hedra hedra is offline
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yes, exhaustion, severe depression, and other similar states can bring out synesthesic experiences. It can also intensify synesthesia for people who have clinically strong synesthesia. I think in the book "the man who tasted shapes" they explain that there is a temptation for some people to abuse depressants like alcohol because the joy/intensity of the cross-connected sensations is so strong, and can be intensified further that way.

If you know anything about visual processing, the basic shapes that appear for synesthsia are the same as your very basic visual building blocks. So if you have a visual cortex, you have the basics for synesthesia. Same for taste, sensation, sound. If you have the associated brain parts working, all you need is a method of crossfiring the receptors. Sleep deprivation, depressants, drugs, and so forth are sufficient to give you a taste of it. Don't know what role it plays in hallucination or to what degree some forms of mental illness cause similar cross-firing of the sensory areas.

I've got a tiny tiny bit of it, not enough for me to run around announcing I have synesthesia, but when I am really really exhausted, I feel voices on the centers of the palms of my hands. I recall one guy having a voice like papery cones pointed at my palms, but with a kind of cotton-ball 'underfeel' - sorry, that is as close as I can explain. Also sometimes during sex when I have a really mindblowing ... um... ::blush:: ... anyway, I get different sensations on my palms (buttery, or velvety, or granular, or smooth, etc., often with combinations of textures), sometimes associated with a wash of color as well. So, definitely state-dependant for us less-creatively wired folk.

(Phew, I managed to get out of that post without saying orgas- YIKES!)
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  #14  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:01 PM
Spiritus Mundi Spiritus Mundi is offline
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I recall reading, years ago, a case study on a person who experienced an unusual form of synesthetic recall. He posessed somethingvery similar to photographic memory, but it was coupled with synesthesia. I wish I could recall, synesthetically or otherwise, where I read it. I think I encountered it about 6 years ago when I was doing a fair amount of reading on the mechanisms of consciousness and memory.

Apparently I should have read with more of an eye towards personal application.

Anyway, this is all just a thinly-veiled cover for the burning question: what does a Spiritus Mundi sense like?
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  #15  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:04 PM
Mr. Cynical Mr. Cynical is offline
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Goodness, tiny cow, could you give me a description of my username? All the kids in MPSIMS would be ever so jealous of the new sig line it would inspire!

Thanks!
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  #16  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:35 PM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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This is going to be long; I apologize for the length but I hate skimping on describing this, especially because words sometime seem inadequate.

Sofis:

Because of the s's in your name, the most prominent color you have is a really rich pink and scarlet. The i is yellow and so it adds a sort of gold highlight to your username. The f is a very dark maroon-purple, something like the r I mentioned in Derleth's name earlier. The o's effect on a word when it comes to color is usually negligible. As for the shape, Sofis, you're very rounded and flowing and kinda soft. Sort of like steam, except—harder or more palpable steam. Maybe even a bit like fabric.

Hi Spiritus, heh.

What you mentioned seems to make me think of a term mentioned on a mailing list I'm on; eidetic imagery. I honestly don't know the meaning of the term and have never seen it used anywhere but on this mailing list, but I haven't read a lot about synesthesia. I have wondered, though, if it applies to the image recall along with the color recall I get when I see words. The image recall often seems to match the actual meaning of the word, though when I'm met with a name like Derleth it's usually something abstract.

Okay. As for your name, "Spiritus" is obviously similar to what I see in "spirit." The s's are deep crimson and tend to be the word's most prominent color, but the green p is brighter, if not more dominant. You also have some yellow highlights in the i's. The purple-maroon r and the brown-maroon-purple t are pretty quiet and sit in the background. The word shape makes me see yellow light along with some intermixed...pieces?...of color, all going upward like if you blast water into the sky and the particles hang there for a bit. It also has two outstretched...limbs, maybe? The "us" makes the word a little heavier and more grounded than the word "spirit."

The colors in "Mundi." The m is sort of a pale red-pink; imagine the color of pale red opaque cake frosting, almost. The u is a very pale and sort of unimportant yellow which really fades next to the orange n and the very green d. The i is not just yellow here but sort of a gold-yellow, possibly because of the effects of the n (letters can change colors somewhat in the context of a word). Unfortunately, the "mund" part of the word makes it sort of look like a heavy, largish lump.

Put together, the effects of the colors in your username are really nice. There are some words, though, where the color mix or the shape isn't so nice. The name of one of our long-gone trolls comes to mind (I won't say it).
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  #17  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:46 PM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Mr. Cynical

The "Mr." part always sort of makes me see a round face with a mustache (best way to describe it, in people terms). But it's not a very big or noticeable part of your name and I rarely pay attention to it. The word "cynical" is full of yellows, golds, and oranges; c's are a gold color, n is orange, and i is true yellow here. The y is a pale pink, almost like salmon, the a is pale enough to be almost white (has some very, VERY pale red in it) and the l is a dark black-maroon. The word image I get for "cynical" is something like someone leaning back, examining something skeptically with narrowed eyes; I can't actually see detailed faces and people with these things, they tend to be more abstract, but the general effect is that of a person. You could almost say the face looks... cynical, heh.
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  #18  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:56 PM
Perderabo Perderabo is offline
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I expect you're probably tired of this, but would you do me too? Thanks in advance.
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  #19  
Old 06-22-2000, 12:58 PM
Sofis Sofis is offline
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Thank very much. I hope you don't mind if paraphhrased a bit.
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Old 06-22-2000, 12:59 PM
Sofis Sofis is offline
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Proofreading, Sofis, proofreading. When will you ever learn?
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Old 06-22-2000, 01:23 PM
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This is fascinating.

You called this a "quirk." This might be a stupid question since evidently you've always been this way, but do you think your condition is good, bad or indifferent? Or does it vary? Do you usually not even think about it? Do you think it has shaped or influenced your personality?

What you've posted so far sounds so creative and artistic. It must have been hard trying to find Internet colors to describe the alphabet on your web site.

If you're not totally sick of this, could you tell me how you see my name? (See what you've started!) Thanks for sharing this with us -

-sulla
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  #22  
Old 06-22-2000, 01:34 PM
fierra fierra is offline
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would you do me too, please, tiny cow? I'm sure you're goingto get fed up of this, but please?

I feel like someone is hitting my chest when I go to concerts (classical piano/loud or modern rock). Um, not bruising hit, but if the music is loud or a certain rhythm, it makes it feel hard to breathe. I thought it just might be sound impacts (like that deal with the kid that got hit in the chest quite lightly but it triggered his heart ot shutdown... can't remember any details about it though). It's never occurred to me to mention it to anyone before though!

Fi.
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Old 06-22-2000, 02:04 PM
Sofis Sofis is offline
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Thank very much. I hope you don't mind if paraphhrased a bit.
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  #24  
Old 06-22-2000, 02:33 PM
insider insider is offline
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Compare colors and create color dictionary?

Have you ever compared your colors with others with the same syndrome? A dictionary of words written in their appropriate colors would be interesting.
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Old 06-22-2000, 03:42 PM
sdimbert sdimbert is offline
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Ooohh! Do me! DO ME!!

:jumping up and down... waving arms:

Please?
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  #26  
Old 06-22-2000, 04:10 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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tiny cow, I hate to jump on the bandwagon, but better now than on page three.

How does "ZenBeam" appear to you?
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  #27  
Old 06-22-2000, 05:12 PM
lee lee is offline
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What color is Tuesday?

I have been taking a poll regarding that question since 1985.

and of course, what is my name, lee, like?
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  #28  
Old 06-22-2000, 05:14 PM
douglips douglips is offline
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Perhaps I'll inject a change of pace by not asking what douglips looks like.

Instead, I am wondering a bit more about the 'separateness' of the sensations that cross over - on your page you mention that looking at, e.g., Derleth you'll see it as black but on a different screen in your mind you see a rectangular prism with the colors.

First, how do you get anything done? It sounds like tripping all the time - I guess it's very hard to understand. From my experience I think I'd just go crazy if it happened all the time.

I've had a sort of similar experience in a very very mild way - I used to have recurring dreams of seeing the 'face of evil' - I'd see the face and know it was evil, but I wasn't scared. The best I can describe it is the most evil thing ever, but also I'm just looking at a face. It sounds like your two different 'mental screens' thing. This was all in dreams, but one day I saw a man with a very similar face. I'd say it was the same face, but I can't be positive. Anyway, I felt the same internal "this is the most evil thing ever" feeling, but I knew he was just a guy. It was still a bit disconcerting as somewhere in the back of my mind I had an urge to flee or protect myself from the evil. It's not quite a sensory input, but it sort of was and it was really freaky. If I felt like this all the time I don't know if I could get used to it.

I've also had on about 3 occasions in my life a sensation of cacophony, of a million voices all trying to talk to me at once, coupled with my body feeling like it is shaking rapidly back and forth over about 6 feet or so - it feels like I'm moving back and forth like a crazed metronome, a touch of vertigo, but I also feel like I'm standing still (because I am) and the cacophony of voices is the same experience. I don't remember what trigged it but I think it was similar to the 'face of evil' thing. It lasts about 1 second or so.

I have no idea if this is synesthesia or not, since it is more abstract than seeing a shape when tasting mint or something - it's more of an emotion not a sensation.

Do people have any similar, more abstract feelings? For example, instead of "eggo looks white and round" do you ever get stuff like "eggo feels like I am about to fall over and have forgotten to study for my History final"?
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Old 06-22-2000, 06:02 PM
aseymayo aseymayo is offline
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Can I get in line?

Oooh! Oooh! Me, too! (If you don't mind.)
Do you get different impressions if you speak a word aloud rather than just look at it?

Kandinsky was apparently a synesthete - he also saw color when he heard music (and vice-versa). His paintings are musical compositions of color - I'd love to know what they sound like. Until I heard of synesthesia, I always thought Mr. K was being fanciful when he said his paints sang to him.
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Old 06-22-2000, 06:25 PM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Whoa...

Okay, heh. Here we go. Because bolding individual letters takes time, I'm just going to capitalize the letters now. Warning: LONG post ahead.

Perderabo:
Most prominent color in yours is green; both the P and the D are green, although they are two different shades. The B on the end is a bright pink that sort of highlights the end of the word. Both E's are very, very pale blue-whites; the O is sort of just there, and the two R's are a deep maroon purple that stays in the background. The word makes me see something/someone with attitude, good posture, you know; a sort of sauciness, maybe. I'm thinking that this is because it partially resembles the word "pert." But it's a more "sedate" word than "pert" is.

sulla:
Most prominent is the deep crimson in the S. You also have a pale yellow in the U, though, and some purple/maroon in the L's that I might almost call black. Don't hit me, but because your name resembles "sullen," it sort of looks a bit silent and heavy. It's also very solid and opaque, and if your name suddenly magically walked I could see it plodding along (as opposed to striding or bouncing or something). It makes me think of Bert (the Sesame Street character), a little bit.

fierra:
Despite the fact that your name doesn't have any oranges or real reds in it or anything, it still looks like a combination of sultry and fierce. The F's and R's are both shades of maroon and purple, but they are not identical (the R's are darker here). They aren't as quiet as you might think; the effect from them in the context of this word is sorta like a stormy red-maroon-purple sky. The I is a normal yellow that pales a little bit because of the blue-white E sitting next to it. The A on the end is important in the word image but not much so in the color.

sdimbert:
First word that came to mind for image was "turtle." Small, squat, close to the ground, crawling around. Not YOU, your name, heh. Although the S would normally be a dominant deep red, it's lowercase here and the D is so bright next to the normally dark red that they're almost equal in prominence. The I is a basic (if a tiny bit pale) yellow, the M is a pale candy red (not extremely pale, but not real red, either) and the B is a pink (not a screaming bright one). The E is a pale blue-white, while the R, a dark purple-maroon, and the brown-dark orange T darken the word somewhat.

ZenBeam:
The "Zen" part of your name is sort of wide and heavy, a bit like a pyramid, but it looks...dignified? It's got a pretty dark orange in the Z and a somewhat brighter orange N. The E is mostly white, here, not much blue to be seen. The "Beam" part is like yellow light radiating from open eyes or an open source; it looks pleased with itself. Interestingly enough, there isn't any yellow in "Beam," the B is a medium pink, the M a pale candy red (as I described it before), and the E a pale blue with a mostly white A (some minor red undertones).

lee:
Tuesday is a brownish-yellow with some red and green background notes (coming from the S and D).
Your name doesn't have much in the way of color (L is a dark maroon-purple, and the E's are almost white with a tiny bit of blue), but it looks like a mouth that's a bit open (teeth are showing a lot) with a tip of a tongue poking out a little. That's because of the E's, which look like they're grinning. Not actually looks like that; but it has that EFFECT of looking like it.

aseymayo:
Your name looks a little like a lopsided, silly but wide smile. It's sort of flat and a bit like cream cheese (in texture appearance, not in taste). It's got mostly similar colors—a pale white-red in the A, a crimson S, pink-salmon Y and the pale candy red M that I've noted in other people's names. But because the first letter is A, the word's main color is VERY pale white-red. You also have pale blue-white E and another A later in the word.
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  #31  
Old 06-22-2000, 06:43 PM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Perderabo, I thought of something else; your name does look a little bouncy and sort of like someone riding on a horse that's moving along at a fairly good clip.

Quote:
douglips:
Instead, I am wondering a bit more about the 'separateness' of the sensations that cross over - on your page you mention that looking at, e.g., Derleth you'll see it as black but on a different screen in your mind you see a rectangular prism with the colors.

First, how do you get anything done? It sounds like tripping all the time - I guess it's very hard to understand. From my experience I think I'd just go crazy if it happened all the time.
I don't usually see the colors in the letters as intensely as you might think; they're sort of darkened or dulled by the fact that these are black letters, but I still can know/see what color they would REALLY be. On the other hand, seeing a letter that IS actually printed in its appropriate color intensifies it (and can make me smile, if I notice it).

In response to both douglips and sulla, the only time I ever consider this a negative is when I've been thinking about it and focusing on it for too long or become upset because of some discussion or something involving it. Then everything seems to go out of control and I want to go sleep so I can get away from it for a while.

doug, when you mention falling over, do you mean more kinesthetic, bodily sensations? If so, the word "thud" can make me feel like that, a little, but for the most part I'm visually synesthetic.

It HAS shaped my personality pretty significantly, I think, even when I didn't know about its "existence." As you might imagine, it affects the way I read and the way I choose to describe things (the words "smile" and "grin" look SO different, for example). When I write, what I'm describing damn well better feel right or I'll be frustrated. But at the same time, I usually don't pay much attention to it, because it is always the way things have been. Think about being in a room with a clock that's ticking—when you pay attention to the clock, it seems to be louder. Otherwise, you don't notice it much.

As for looking for appropriate computer colors on the page, sulla, it drove me up the wall. I have to cringe when I see that I can't find an appropriate color for my letters. It's NOT that shade of green, it's THIS one!
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Old 06-22-2000, 08:00 PM
Koffing Koffing is offline
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This rules!

tinycow, that's a really neat senational experience you have. It's like you get an extra layer of sense out of things. Perchance, could you share the sense of 'Koffing'?

Wow, it's like an altered state all the time. I'm mildly envious, actually.
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Old 06-22-2000, 08:11 PM
mega the roo mega the roo is offline
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tinycow, would you do me too, please?
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  #34  
Old 06-22-2000, 08:25 PM
eggo eggo is offline
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I'm sorry tiny cow, i didn't mean to start this phenomenon... you'll be describing names till the cows come home (no pun intended) if you don't put your foot down.

one small question, do written colors make you see those colors? (i.e. when i say "blue" do you see blue, or is it somthing else? what shape is blue?)
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Old 06-22-2000, 08:31 PM
douglips douglips is offline
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Return to the Valley of Revenge of Ask the Gay Guy!

Ask the Synesthete!

OK, I have to ask - what do you sense from the word synesthesia?

Just kidding. I imagine all this "What does my name smell like" stuff would get tiresome after the first 18,000 posts.

Thanks for sharing, tiny cow.
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  #36  
Old 06-22-2000, 08:56 PM
lee lee is offline
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Thank you!!!!!

I always see Tuesday as a school bus yellow. Most people say it is blue.
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  #37  
Old 06-22-2000, 10:30 PM
Silo Silo is offline
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Ahem, people with schitzophrenia experience synesthesia commonly. I experienced it to back in my PCP/LSD/ Mescaline..et al mucho- days. It's strange getting sensory signals mixed up...and hard to explain. You can taste music, hear colors, feel sounds...weird stuff.
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  #38  
Old 06-22-2000, 10:52 PM
tiny cow tiny cow is offline
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Koffing:
The prominent color in your name is the periwinkle blue in the letter K. The last three letters of your name—I, N, G—progress like this: yellow, bright orange, pale red. Kind of a cool effect. The two F's are a dark, dark maroon purple. Because of the O in the first half of your name, it makes it have the effect of an open aperture with a round shape.

mega the roo:
The word "mega" is mostly pink-red because the M is a pale red that has more pink in it than the G does (also a pale red). The E is a pale white-blue, and the A doesn't have much effect; it is white, though, with red tones. If you've ever seen one of those Transformers cartoons or commercials, the word "mega" contains an image that somewhat resembles a bit of one. The word "the" is mostly brownish-orange because the T is brown-orange (more brown) and the H is darker orange. The word "roo"—have you ever seen a pika? It's this rodent in Siberia, I think, that looks like a cross between a chipmunk and a mouse, or something. Sorta cute. But the colors of "roo" are a dark maroon-purple in the R and then either black/white in the O's.

Quote:
eggo:
I'm sorry tiny cow, i didn't mean to start this phenomenon... you'll be describing names till the cows come home (no pun intended) if you don't put your foot down.
No problem, eggo.. I realize that the idea seems cool to people when they first confront it. Actually, sometimes I'll sit with crayons or the Paint program and write or type words in their appropriate colors, just for the fun of it. The only time this is difficult is when I have to try and articulate the images—things that are purely visual concepts.

Quote:
douglips:
Return to the Valley of Revenge of Ask the Gay Guy!
Hey, if Esprix and I teamed up, we'd have a record-setting thread.
(No, that's not a suggestion. Stop clicking "New Thread," all of you...)

And as for the word synesthesia, here's a bitmap file that I colored as best I could (it should load in Paint):
http://geocities.com/atinycow/syn.bmp
The word image makes me see something resembling an arm playing a violin, and when I say it out loud I think of lightning.
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  #39  
Old 06-23-2000, 10:12 AM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Comparing Colors

It is unlikely that I will ever find this page again for a reply, but when it comes to comparing colors, they are completely differnt from individual to individual. I was simply amazed that Tiny Cow sees the letter D as green because that is the same color I "see".
In fact, d is the most prominent color for me. Some letters I am very unsure of as to their color. Clearly I only have a mild form of it. I cannot figure out what the color for "O" is though I am certain it is a very dark color. It might be black. "T" is black to me, but maybe they have the same color.
I don't literally see the colors when I see the letters. I didn't actually notice that i had these accosiations until I was playing the piano when I suddenly realized that the key of "D" was green, and that it had always been green. I don't have perfect pitch so it makes sense that the color was actually associated with the letter "D".
Strangly, I had been using these associations all of my life. When learning peoples names or a foreign language, I had an amazing talent for remembering the first letter of a word or name but neverthe rest. I have finally come to realize, it is because I remember the color I associate with the name that I remember. Even some Russian characters have their own color. You will notice from my atrocious spelling that I don't even pay attention to the other letters in a word.
As for whether this condition is an advantage or a disadvantage, I don't know how it could be much of either. It could only be an indication of how a particular mind works. My guess is that people with this condition have many similar personality traits.
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Old 06-23-2000, 10:26 AM
Balance Balance is offline
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In college, I found that I experienced sound/light crossovers under conditions of extreme fatigue (70+ hours of continuous activity--kids, don't try this at home!) I found my self looking out a car window at tree shadows and hearing kind of a simple rhythm/melody as the light flickered and changed shades of green--kinda neat. On the other hand, I can't recommend listening to the Heavy Metal soundtrack in that state. Fascinating stuff, tiny cow. I think I'm just as glad that mine goes away when I get enough sleep--I don't know that I could cope with it all the time. I'm picky enough about my wording without having to worry about the color scheme! I suppose that with it always on, you're sufficiently accustomed to it that it doesn't generally disrupt your activities.
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Old 06-23-2000, 09:25 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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I read a fascinating book on this subject once called The Man who Tasted Shapes. It was a very absorbing description of how a doctor accidentally got involved in the study of synesthesia, as well as of the frighteningly dismissive reactions he received from his colleagues. Excellent book.

Ok, ok. What does Matt McLauchlin look like?
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  #42  
Old 06-24-2000, 01:12 AM
surel surel is offline
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I remember part of a lecture on this in a psych class in college. Apparently one person with synesthesia actually made a movie (iirc) with sounds and his matching perceptions. Most people found it interesting, but it really annoyed other people with synesthesia of sound to sight because they said he got it all wrong. It'd be really cool if synesthesia tend to lead to the same links, but it seems to just be semi-random personal links. It's still kinda nifty though.
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  #43  
Old 06-26-2000, 10:57 AM
fierra fierra is offline
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[QUOTE][B]
Okay, heh.

fierra:
Despite the fact that your name doesn't have any oranges or real reds in it or anything, it still looks like a combination of sultry and fierce. The F's and R's are both shades of maroon and purple, but they are not identical (the R's are darker here). They aren't as quiet as you might think; the effect from them in the context of this word is sorta like a stormy red-maroon-purple sky. The I is a normal yellow that pales a little bit because of the blue-white E sitting next to it. The A on the end is important in the word image but not much so in the color.

Wow, thanks, tiny cow.

Sultry & fierce! I feel like a fire-storm. Although the yellow & the blue-white make me feel like a super nova!

Fi.
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  #44  
Old 06-26-2000, 11:19 AM
LouisB LouisB is offline
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tiny cow, do you always or at least consistently see the same name in the same colors and shapes? Does an alternate spelling of a name completely change your perception? Are your perceptions of colors and shapes unique to you or are they shared with others having your abilities?

I had no idea these abilities existed and I find this absolutely fascinating.

Finally: Please?
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  #45  
Old 06-30-2000, 09:57 AM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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ZenBeam:
The "Zen" part of your name is sort of wide and heavy, a bit like a pyramid, but it looks...dignified? It's got a pretty dark orange in the Z and a somewhat brighter orange N. The E is mostly white, here, not much blue to be seen. The "Beam" part is like yellow light radiating from open eyes or an open source; it looks pleased with itself. Interestingly enough, there isn't any yellow in "Beam," the B is a medium pink, the M a pale candy red (as I described it before), and the E a pale blue with a mostly white A (some minor red undertones). [/quote]

Thanks tiny cow. dignified, pleased with itself, I like that.

Hey, this may be your chance to make millions. Set up a web site offering Synestetic Readings or Ask the Synesthete or something. Look how popular this was here. Imagine how well you might do with the psychic readings crowd.
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  #46  
Old 06-30-2000, 10:19 AM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is online now
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For a more lyrical take on the subject, there's a song called "Synaesthesia" by The Bobs.

http://www.bobs.com/Recordings/Lyrics.cgi?Synaesthesia
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  #47  
Old 07-29-2000, 08:15 AM
eyor eyor is offline
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Wow, that has to be one of the coolest things I have ever heard! I kind of wish I had it, it woudl make me happy.

do you ever get frustrated or wish that you didnt have it?

also, you should paint or write books. an autobiography! your condition could be an inspiration for making art, and you'd be able to try to express what you "see."

or better yet, set up a booth entitled "Get your verbal Syntheastic charicature!"

think of the possibilities!

oh and just out of curiosity, what does my---oops, sorry, I wont ask
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  #48  
Old 07-29-2000, 08:55 AM
Gravity Gravity is offline
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More artistic?

I wonder if anyone has done any studdies about the creativity levels of synesthetes compared to non-synesthetes.
I wonder if this is what's up with folks who see auras. It sounds very similar to what was described by a friend of mine in high school when she was trying to describe how she saw auras around people. She said something like "everyone has a color. When I see someone I say 'oh, she's purple with bluish radiating rays. She reminds me of thunder.'"
I always thought that it would be a very cool thing to be able to see. It's sort of like the best free association excercises that I've ever heard of, bumped up a few notches.

...and, if you aren't totally sick of it, could you tell me about your impressions of my name? I wish I had such a talent so that I could share back with you.

K.
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  #49  
Old 09-14-2000, 10:27 PM
Dragon Phoenix Dragon Phoenix is offline
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Bumping for Tiny cow.
I was directed here from another web site, where some of the gang have been posting your "analysis" of their names. Could you do one more? Mine? Please?
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  #50  
Old 09-14-2000, 10:46 PM
Dijon Warlock Dijon Warlock is offline
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Re: More artistic?

Quote:
Originally posted by Gravity
I wonder if anyone has done any studdies about the creativity levels of synesthetes compared to non-synesthetes.
I don't know about studies, but many synesthetes ARE quite creative. A famous one was Vladimir Nabokov, the author of "Lolita." I believe that Nikola Tesla was also synesthetic. Me, I tend to be more anesthetic these days...
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