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Old 01-13-2019, 01:14 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is online now
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Are hogs really so aggresively predacious as portrayed in some recent-ish movies?

Last night we watched Stranded, a 2003 movie about some people who get marooned on a remote island in the Indian Ocean. At one point a boar chases two boys up a tree, and then continues jumping up and snapping at them like a rabid wolf.

Then in another movie from around the same time, the bad guys killed a victim by throwing him in the pigsty, where a dozen pigs fell on him like so many porcine pirhanas...and devoured him. I think something similar happened in still another film but I don't remember for sure. It might have been that a murder victim's body was disposed of by...yes you guessed it...throwing it in the pigsty.

Now I know pigs are omnivorous so they must eat meat sometimes. But do they chase and kill prey? And would presumably well fed farm pigs eagerly pounce on any meat, alive or dead, dropped into their enclosure?

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Old 01-13-2019, 01:35 PM
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I raised small hogs for a few years. They were bred specifically for their small manageable size and amiable temperament. The largest of them was my boar, who topped out at a tiny 270 lbs. He was as sweet as you could ever expect a boar to be.

I got out of the hog-raising game because I live alone and their innate pushiness for food was unnerving. I always kept a fence or a gate between me and them when letting them in and out of their pen, and I used food to direct their behavior as I wished. Example: I would throw some sweet feed out into the pasture before opening the gate from their pen to make sure they went to the pasture instead of crowding around me. I always carried a pig stick to discourage the crowding and their penchant for nibbling at my feet/legs.

The only time I ever actually panicked during my stint as a hog farmer was when they exploited a weak spot under the hot wire that ran around the bottom of their pen and got out. I had to restring wire during the wettest part of winter, got a leg stuck hard in their wallow area. It took a full 15 minutes to extricate my leg, and during that time I had horrible visions of my pigs running back to me, knocking me fully to the ground and... well, after a time, who knows?

Well fed farm pigs will eagerly pounce on meat, alive or dead. Some boars will eat their own young if not segregated from them, so yes, they will chase and kill prey. Even comparatively docile pigs are nothing more than vehicles for voracious stomachs. They are bred to eat, and that is what they do.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:39 PM
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Farm-fed, probably not. Wild or feral, yes, but it's pretty rare. It usually happens during rutting season.

Boars like to attack from behind, tusking you in the thigh, and they will continue attacking until you no longer present a threat. Once you're in it with a wild boar, you're in it until the end--special spears had to be designed for hunting them because they'd push the spear through themselves to get at the person holding it. Boar spears have a cross-piece that prevent that and keeps the animal at spear's length.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:43 PM
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They are mean. Feral pigs will come straight for you. Mr.Wrekker is on a hog hunt as we speak. He tells harrowing tales of happenings in the field. He says to never turn your back on them.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:46 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
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I'm not sure about being attacked and eaten alive by pigs as so disturbingly depicted in the film Hannibal. However...

Canadian serial killer Robert Pickton may have fed some of his victims to pigs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Pickton

This poor little boy was abused and neglected to death near Kansas City before being fed go pigs:
Adrian Jones murder.
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Old 01-13-2019, 03:05 PM
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When we were renting a sublet on a place with pigs, we would toss them mice from the traps. Hog wild, yeah, scary. I was stationed in Germany at the time, so Nazi pigs, but still.
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Old 01-13-2019, 03:58 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Was one of the movies in the OP Hannibal? Another thing to watch is Game of Thrones.

They are voracious and can be territorial.
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Old 01-13-2019, 04:45 PM
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Getting rid of murder victims also happened in Snatch, as I recall.

(Or was it Lock, Stock and two smoking barrels?)

Last edited by Teuton; 01-13-2019 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 01-13-2019, 04:49 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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Getting rid of murder victims also happened in Snatch, as I recall.

(Or was it Lock, Stock and two smoking barrels?)
Snatch. It doesn't happen on camera or anything, just a discussion about it.

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Old 01-13-2019, 05:14 PM
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Razorbacks, just sayin'.

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Old 01-13-2019, 07:46 PM
Reindeer Flotilla Reindeer Flotilla is offline
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Snatch. It doesn't happen on camera or anything, just a discussion about it.
Also Deadwood. Seems like some victim of foul play was fed to Wu's pigs practically once an episode. And speaking of media portrayal of dangerous pigs, my first exposure as a kid to that idea was watching the beginning of The Wizard of Oz.
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Old 01-13-2019, 07:57 PM
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My mom had a cousin who married a farmer. They had pigs, amongst other livestock. Once, as a young child, I ventured into the pigpen, I don't know why, those hogs were enormous. The guy came out and saw me in there and hollered at me in an angry, loud voice to get out of there. Later my mom told me he'd not been so angry as scared, since the pigs could be dangerous. My first introduction that animals usually depicted to kids as cute could be.....not cute.
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:36 PM
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My father's cousin had a pig that was notorious for breaking out his pen and eating the neighbor's chickens.

Last edited by TSBG; 01-13-2019 at 08:37 PM.
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Old 01-13-2019, 09:03 PM
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I was born and raised on a farm and we raised pigs as well as dairy cows.

Even as a young lad starting at say 10-12 years old, I would go in the pens for feeding and cleaning out the manure. I never had any fears for my safety.

The only time we had to watch out for, was if a sow had given birth in the free pen and we were trying to round up the piglets to move them to a segregated pen.
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Old 01-13-2019, 09:03 PM
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Are they wild killing machines bent on destroying all in their path? No. Will they attack humans unprovoked? Certainly. In the Middle Ages, pigs attacking children was a-I wouldn't go so far as to say common-experience, but certainly a real danger. Even today, wild pig attacks are surprisingly frequent, probably more frequent than bear attacks and surprisingly fatal in many instances. Here's a study of such things.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...zOoCBalcPKRduq
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:09 PM
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A recent instance.
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:29 PM
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My father's cousin had a pig that was notorious for breaking out his pen and eating the neighbor's chickens.
I actually thought at first that you wrote "My father's cousin had a pig that was notorious for breaking out his pen and eating the neighbor's children."
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:53 PM
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I read an alleged historical account from the Medieval ages once that said a pig had eaten a baby alive. The community in their wisdom forced the pig to dress in clothing, put it on trial, and had it at the stand to face accusations and everything. Not sure if it was true or not but said pig was sentenced to death and executed, no word on if the bacon tasted better.
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Old 01-13-2019, 11:08 PM
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One would assume that pigs grown for food have been bred for docility while pigs in the wild have been bred by natural selection for a more aggressive temperament.

I really don't know the details, but comparing pigs that have been bred for food to wild boars is probably like comparing two totally different animals.
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:09 AM
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One would assume that pigs grown for food have been bred for docility while pigs in the wild have been bred by natural selection for a more aggressive temperament.

I really don't know the details, but comparing pigs that have been bred for food to wild boars is probably like comparing two totally different animals.
IDK but dogs have been bred to be our friends and to hunt and live beside us. A big powerful dog can still kill you. A tiny lap dog can hurt you. Just because they are bred domestic pigs doesn't mean they wouldn't instinctively kill and eat a person if they were put to the test. Don't turn your back on one.
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:37 AM
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I wouldn't assume any hogs you see in the wild are original wild boar. In the US, they almost certainly aren't. They're mostly feral pigs, which are domestic pigs that have been reintroduced into the wild (either recently in the last few decades or when people first got to the Americas). They generally aren't violent towards humans, but they can be very aggressive under the right circumstances, like being hunted and harried by dogs and people. I wouldn't count on it being the result of breeding for docility, either. They were bred for food, not for behavior.

A page from Texas A&M.
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:53 AM
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I wouldn't assume any hogs you see in the wild are original wild boar. In the US, they almost certainly aren't. They're mostly feral pigs, which are domestic pigs that have been reintroduced into the wild (either recently in the last few decades or when people first got to the Americas). They generally aren't violent towards humans, but they can be very aggressive under the right circumstances, like being hunted and harried by dogs and people. I wouldn't count on it being the result of breeding for docility, either. They were bred for food, not for behavior.



A page from Texas A&M.
They're the exact same animal, Sus scrofa. The true wild pigs are Eurasian, so the ones in the US are likely accidental or intentional escapees. Yet there seems to be some atavism, cute domestic pig stock will grow tusks and hair.

Though in most cases they are considered invasive, in Hawaii they've been there as long as native Hawaiians have been. I don't know a good justification for eradication there.

The US has native piglike creatures, the javelinas and peccaries.
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Old 01-14-2019, 08:27 AM
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The US has native piglike creatures, the javelinas and peccaries.
I've heard that peccary is a little pig with a white color that hangs around between Texas and Paraguay, sometimes ranging as far west as Catalina.
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:14 AM
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Though in most cases they are considered invasive, in Hawaii they've been there as long as native Hawaiians have been. I don't know a good justification for eradication there.
If you could see my back yard, you'd know one. Over the past few years the population on the Big Island has gotten completely out of control - I've counted as many as 8 at a time running around my property, whereas in the early 2000s I never saw any. It's impossible to have a garden because they'll eat everything. They've completely snouted up the back yard looking for grubs - in the space of a few weeks it went from a lush green area to just dirt.

They're a menace. I've not ever felt threatened for my personal safety, but that probably says more about my ignorance than anything else.
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:55 AM
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Fans of HBO's Deadwood, will remember Woo's pig sty, where the dead were taken to be disposed of.
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:15 PM
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I've heard that peccary is a little pig with a white color that hangs around between Texas and Paraguay, sometimes ranging as far west as Catalina.
Catalina, Catalina. I hear that they’re gregarious as well.
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:22 PM
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Scariest pig movie scene?
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:48 PM
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Fans of HBO's Deadwood, will remember Woo's pig sty, where the dead were taken to be disposed of.
I’ve never watched the show but I did read post #11 in this thread so I do remember.
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:04 PM
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I wouldn't assume any hogs you see in the wild are original wild boar. In the US, they almost certainly aren't. They're mostly feral pigs, which are domestic pigs that have been reintroduced into the wild (either recently in the last few decades or when people first got to the Americas). They generally aren't violent towards humans, but they can be very aggressive under the right circumstances, like being hunted and harried by dogs and people. I wouldn't count on it being the result of breeding for docility, either. They were bred for food, not for behavior.

A page from Texas A&M.
When you are breeding animals to live in confined quarters that need to be controlled and slaughtered, wouldn't breeding them for docility be expected?

Aggressive pigs will kill each other, try to escape and attack the farmer.
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:06 PM
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I've heard that peccary is a little pig with a white color that hangs around between Texas and Paraguay, sometimes ranging as far west as Catalina.
What is Catalina, in Arizona? They're a stinky pig. Javelina is the normal name in that part of the world (Spanish: more like havalina). That species is the collared peccary, but there are more species south.
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If you could see my back yard, you'd know one. Over the past few years the population on the Big Island has gotten completely out of control - I've counted as many as 8 at a time running around my property, whereas in the early 2000s I never saw any. It's impossible to have a garden because they'll eat everything. They've completely snouted up the back yard looking for grubs - in the space of a few weeks it went from a lush green area to just dirt.

They're a menace. I've not ever felt threatened for my personal safety, but that probably says more about my ignorance than anything else.
No doubt. The big issue is that they are as native as native Hawaiians. But most of the complaint is due to the environmental and financial damage they do. Nobody wants to eliminate imports from China or the Middle East.
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Old 01-15-2019, 03:31 PM
Reindeer Flotilla Reindeer Flotilla is offline
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Fans of HBO's Deadwood, will remember Woo's pig sty, where the dead were taken to be disposed of.
I’ve never watched the show but I did read post #11 in this thread so I do remember.


For a second there, I thought Wu in Deadwood had a truther or anti-vax pig sty on the side.
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Old 01-15-2019, 08:07 PM
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When you are breeding animals to live in confined quarters that need to be controlled and slaughtered, wouldn't breeding them for docility be expected?

Aggressive pigs will kill each other, try to escape and attack the farmer.
I have to agree, in as much as pigs with that level of aggression would be killed and not allowed to breed. That's not quite the same as breeding specifically for docility, but the end result is partway there.

End directed breeding never really gets into the whys of results though. Like breeding for large size, sometimes you get big muscles due to myostatin mutation, but it could be a lot of domestic animals bred for size simply feel like they are starving regardless of how much they eat. Placid pigs maybe just have no ambition, ha. As long as they're fed, why go anywhere or cause problems. Starving pigs might get more ambitious to procure food - and maybe a farmer is on a fine line between starving hungry = good for fat pigs, to really starving hungry = farmer looks like food.
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Old 01-15-2019, 08:12 PM
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What is Catalina, in Arizona? They're a stinky pig. Javelina is the normal name in that part of the world (Spanish: more like havalina). That species is the collared peccary, but there are more species south.

No doubt. The big issue is that they are as native as native Hawaiians. But most of the complaint is due to the environmental and financial damage they do. Nobody wants to eliminate imports from China or the Middle East.
Catalina Island is a smallish island 26 miles off the coast from Los Angeles Harbor.

Last edited by kaylasdad99; 01-15-2019 at 08:12 PM.
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Old 01-15-2019, 09:36 PM
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Catalina Island is a smallish island 26 miles off the coast from Los Angeles Harbor.
Ah, that's the only one I've heard of but Wikipedia told me there is an Arizona one. Today I learned...
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Old 01-15-2019, 10:25 PM
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There's just so much you can breed out of a porker. The instinctive need to eat, to mate or to protect young are strong in farm animals. That's why the farmer keeps the hogzilla male in a strong enclosure. Not only will he run you over he may kill. He will kill piglets and mate every sow in season. And run to the neighbors and cause havoc there. Boar hogs are not nice.
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:02 PM
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There are many images on the web of people, mainly women, who have pigs as pets. Indoors too.

https://animals.mom.me/indoor-pig-care-2017.html
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:14 PM
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back when this was a big thing 6 or 7 years ago nat geo had a series of specials on it and in one researchers found out that if you let it loose it only takes about 6-8 weeks for a farm pig to physically change into a boar when they let it loose

When they recaught it took roughly the same amount of the time to turn back into a farm pig
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:17 PM
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can you hunt them carol? feral pigs are one of the few things that you don't need permits for and theres no limits usually

im surprised the natives aren't "pig sticking " like their ancestors ….
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:31 PM
thelurkinghorror thelurkinghorror is offline
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can you hunt them carol? feral pigs are one of the few things that you don't need permits for and theres no limits usually

im surprised the natives aren't "pig sticking " like their ancestors ….
Depends on the state. Some states it's open season. In California they're tagged, you can still take as many as you want but have to get permission beforehand. In other states, especially those with no pigs or a tiny population, it is illegal to hunt them. The reasoning is that it will encourage intentionally released populations.
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:55 PM
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If you could see my back yard, you'd know one. Over the past few years the population on the Big Island has gotten completely out of control - I've counted as many as 8 at a time running around my property, whereas in the early 2000s I never saw any. It's impossible to have a garden because they'll eat everything. They've completely snouted up the back yard looking for grubs - in the space of a few weeks it went from a lush green area to just dirt.

They're a menace. I've not ever felt threatened for my personal safety, but that probably says more about my ignorance than anything else.
Y'all don't like bacon and carnitas over in Hawaii?
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Old 01-16-2019, 06:26 PM
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One would assume that pigs grown for food have been bred for docility while pigs in the wild have been bred by natural selection for a more aggressive temperament.

I really don't know the details, but comparing pigs that have been bred for food to wild boars is probably like comparing two totally different animals.
I tend to agree. I was raised on a small farm in an area of small farms. Everyone had pigs. When they weren't being eaten, they a were treated as pets. In the winter the pigs would burrow into a straw pile and my brothers and I would burrow in with them. They kept us warm. BTW, pigs are really clean. They reserve one special area as a latrine, unlike cattle who shit where they stand.
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Old 01-16-2019, 06:39 PM
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can you hunt them carol? feral pigs are one of the few things that you don't need permits for and theres no limits usually

im surprised the natives aren't "pig sticking " like their ancestors ….
Yes you can hunt them, and lots of people do.

I believe Carol posted a long thread a while back about the pig trap on her property and her native neighbor who killed and roasted the pigs that were trapped in it.
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Old 01-16-2019, 06:52 PM
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Shoot yeah, you can hunt them. Texas is full of them. Arkansas has it's share. There's a rasher(heh) of them living on our 90 acres. They haven't got to the point of ruining stuff yet. When they do it's bye-bye porky-pig. Mr.Wrekker won't stand for it.
The problem is getting rid of the meat. Nobody wants wild hog. Mr.Wrekker says they are wormy as heck. In Texas some exotic animal farms buy the carcasses to feed their big cats.
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Old 01-17-2019, 09:47 AM
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My mom had a cousin who married a farmer. They had pigs, amongst other livestock. Once, as a young child, I ventured into the pigpen, I don't know why, those hogs were enormous. The guy came out and saw me in there and hollered at me in an angry, loud voice to get out of there. Later my mom told me he'd not been so angry as scared, since the pigs could be dangerous. My first introduction that animals usually depicted to kids as cute could be.....not cute.
That scene at the beginning of The Wizard of Oz movie where Dorothy snags her foot and tumbles into the hog pen to everyone's consternation? It wasn't the hard ground they were concerned about.
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Old 01-17-2019, 11:52 AM
Shinna Minna Ma Shinna Minna Ma is offline
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There are wild boar where we used to live in the Shomron (a/k/a Samaria). They'd come out of the olive groves at night (they're nocturnal) and dig up back yards and make lots of noise. Residents were told that if we were ever chased by a boar, zig-zag while running, since a boar's eyesight isn't that good. Also, even those with rifles were told not to shoot at the boars - the ammunition in their rifles wasn't big enough to damage the boars.

Every once in a while, the local council would bring in professional boar hunters. That's when we'd get text messages saying things like, "If you hear any gunshots in the wadi tonight between 22:00 and 02:00, it's only the boar hunters."
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Old 01-17-2019, 02:08 PM
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In the old legends, folks were terrified of cows (bulls), pigs (boars), sheep (rams), and deer (stags). just going into the wildnerness risked getting fucked up by animals that we now think of as domesticated.
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Old 01-17-2019, 05:44 PM
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That scene at the beginning of The Wizard of Oz movie where Dorothy snags her foot and tumbles into the hog pen to everyone's consternation? It wasn't the hard ground they were concerned about.
Umm...

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Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
I’ve never watched the show but I did read post #11 in this thread so I do remember.
Alas poor post #11! I knew him, DesertDog: a post of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy: it hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is!
  #48  
Old 01-18-2019, 07:35 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is online now
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Ah. I overlooked that last part of post #11. Still, more than one farmer "got et by the hogs" when he was rendered helpless and when I saw the scene as a tot, I thought it was the tumble they were worried about, not where she'd landed.
  #49  
Old 01-18-2019, 09:44 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nansbread1 View Post
There are many images on the web of people, mainly women, who have pigs as pets. Indoors too.

https://animals.mom.me/indoor-pig-care-2017.html
There was a craze of having pot-bellied pigs and kunekune pigs as pets. They are pretty small and presumably less dangerous. My local children's petting zoo has kunekune pigs, so they must be pretty safe.
  #50  
Old 01-18-2019, 10:22 AM
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Old Yeller is where I learned pigs are not to be trifled with. They'd just finished fucking up the dog and I turned and looked at Mom who (having been a farm-born Arkansas girl) confirmed they were dangerous precisely because they were absolutely hateful savages that don't look particularly dangerous. Her mom had her leg gnawed pretty badly (this would have been in the late 40s-early 50s) and it was apparently a pretty impressive feat that she didn't lose the leg. I always feel a sense of turnabout when I eat pork. Like "We won...this time."
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