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Old 01-19-2019, 04:16 AM
squish7 squish7 is offline
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Tips pitching to giants as an undiscovered inventor in a new field

I think I may dedicate the rest of my life's work to the newborn fields of Augmented Reality (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR), although the details of these fields aren't vital to this thread. I'm radically creative, and I know big players will love many ideas I have for these fields. I have years of rudimentary groundwork on one idea, but my more important feature is my creative mindset, the way I can come up with new things instantly and impress and excite people with enticing possibilities. But, I have zero credentials; no successes or work history to speak of. How might I fast tack up the ranks to the top-level creative decision makers?

My main method right now is to create enticing "pitch" videos to excite the viewer about my projects, then ask an AR/MR company/etc to view it. Any tips on getting such on the desk of the higher-ranking execs?
  #2  
Old 01-19-2019, 06:33 AM
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A reflection on the advice you received in the days when you were asking this before is probably the best thing.
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Old 01-19-2019, 07:20 AM
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If you insist on bringing up that thread, why don't you summarize what you think the parallels are to this question and the aspects of it that you think the board has already responded to, to help save us all time.
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Old 01-19-2019, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by squish7 View Post
I'm radically creative, and I know big players will love many ideas I have for these fields. I have years of rudimentary groundwork on one idea, but my more important feature is my creative mindset, the way I can come up with new things instantly and impress and excite people with enticing possibilities.
Impress them with your humility.
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:02 AM
Walton Firm Walton Firm is offline
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It's very difficult to make it straight to the top in any field as an outsider. So your best bet is to become an insider first.

So, start by joining a company in the field you want to break into. Since you have no reputation, track record, or impressive resume yet, you'll need to start on the ground floor, by getting a job as Second Assistant Undersecretary in the Production Department or whatever. Even at that level, "getting a job" is not automatic, but for an exceptionally creative and inspirational person such as yourself, I'm sure you'll have no problem passing the interview.

Once you're inside, it's just a matter of making your way up through the ranks, impressing the people around you, and building up a network of people who know about your abilities and are willing to trust you with increasingly ambitious projects. When you speak up with some creative idea, people will listen; when you ask for a meeting with the Big Boss in charge of allocating budget to new projects, she will know your name already and know that your ideas tend to be worth listening to.

It may take a couple of years before you've reached the level where you can pitch directly to top-level giants in the field. But if you're really exceptionally good, it could go pretty fast, and those couple of years can be rewarding in their own right already. And anyway, a few years of "paying your dues" is not an unreasonably large investment for something you're planning to dedicate the rest of your life to.

Good luck!

Last edited by Walton Firm; 01-19-2019 at 08:04 AM.
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:47 AM
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From the history of your threads, it seems like you would be well-suited to marketing or audiovisual production. You could start a Youtube channel where you can try stuff out.

As for AR/VR, if you don't want to start in an entry-level industry position, your best bet is to make something shipable yourself from your garage/basement/bedroom. As a parallel, Christopher Nolan started his career making Following with a $6000 budget. Kevin Smith's career was launched by Clerks with less than $30 000 budget.


On a more general note, I'm wondering about something, there may not be anything to it but here goes: Do you find yourself going through periods where everything's great then down periods, more than is typical for most people?
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:49 AM
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Thanks, Walton. That's helpful. While I'm not planning on that precise route per se, it's good to think about being patient and the value of slowly building your network. It would be a bit paradoxical/difficult for someone with creative methods like mine to follow the exact formulated path you've laid out--or any precise formulated path--but a lot of the time-tested generals you talk about still apply, e.g. building trust over time.

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Impress them with your humility.
Why do people on SD unfairly project grandeur onto me when I talk about having a radically creative mindset? If you think there's a purely neutral, factual way to relay my type of braintype/skillset that isn't going to insult and offend you, say so now or forever hold your peace. I don't think the same way other people do; my brain is extremely atypical chemically. (Can I say "extremely atypical"?)
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:05 AM
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Why do people on SD unfairly project grandeur onto me when I talk about having a radically creative mindset?
Because history has shown that the vast majority of people who say things like you do are not accurately self-reporting. And specifically, your previous thread was a graphic example of not seeing the world objectively.

My experience is that people who are radically creative are busy creating things.
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:14 AM
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Yep. Talk is cheap.
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:38 AM
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Why do people on SD unfairly project grandeur onto me when I talk about having a radically creative mindset?
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Because history has shown that the vast majority of people who say things like you do are not accurately self-reporting. And specifically, your previous thread was a graphic example of not seeing the world objectively.

My experience is that people who are radically creative are busy creating things.
This. If you were truly radically creative you would have already created something radical instead of asking how to pitch companies to basically get others to do the hard work for you.

Tens of thousands of people think they have groundbreaking ideas - if only someone else would make it work
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:44 AM
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@MichaelEmouse,

I'm listening to you very carefully because you're speaking from an educated position regarding me personally. You're also being polite; you guys only do that half time

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Do you find yourself going through periods where everything's great then down periods, more than is typical for most people?
Let's skip a light-year of convolution to the part where I just tell you my diagnosis under the DSM. I have very potent ADHD, and also am schizoaffective (a sort of misc. category they throw you in when they can't quite figure you out, technically a combination of elements of both bipolar and schizophrenia). Now on paper, these are called mental "disorders" but history has shown ad nauseam that people with these braintypes in some contexts can be incredibly beneficial to the world in the way of leaders, entrepreneurs, geniuses, CEOs, etc... In other contexts, they can be troublemakers. There's not a lot of in-between, and I try my best to live in the positive end of the spectrum, so I don't know what I can possibly say that isn't going to offend someone hell-bent on being insulted that someone is different.

I'm 39. I've already been through the lifetime process of medication refinement (I'm on Lamictal, Seroquel, and always some stimulant for ADHD), in other words we've warded off most of the troublemaking downsides. The ONLY THING LEFT is to harness the beneficial creative elements, to change the world for the better etcetcetc.... What do you suggest I call all this that isn't going to summon hostility from others?

Last edited by squish7; 01-19-2019 at 09:46 AM.
  #12  
Old 01-19-2019, 09:55 AM
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My experience is that people who are radically creative are busy creating things.
Yes, obviously, of course, I'm very busy creating things. Why do you assume I'm not? Because I'm not established yet? You will only accept the proof that I'm busy creating things once I'm running a multi-billion $ empire? It's only then you're able to see "Oh, I see, he was busy creating something!" You think that prior to the success of someone's first invention, novel, etc, they were sitting around doing nothing?

Last edited by squish7; 01-19-2019 at 09:57 AM.
  #13  
Old 01-19-2019, 10:01 AM
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Tens of thousands of people think they have groundbreaking ideas - if only someone else would make it work
Why do you make the arrogant, defaming, ongoing assumption that I'm not working hard to execute/implement my ideas?
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:08 AM
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Ideas are worth nearly nothing. There's just too many of them out there, and the laws of supply and demand apply to ideas just as much as to any other product. What is scarce, and therefore valuable, is implementation of ideas. Don't just come up with an idea to make something. Actually make it. Sure, yours probably won't be as fancy and polished as something made professionally by an established company, but make something.
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:22 AM
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@Chronos: Why does the board badger me with the personal attack that I don't work hard at building, executing, developing, writing, designing, coding, etc, etc? Where does this delusion come from and why do you keep at it?

Last edited by squish7; 01-19-2019 at 10:25 AM.
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:55 AM
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The evidence of the past OPs of yours and your responses are good basis for such impressions and such conclusions.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:05 AM
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I know quite a few successful people who initiated a later-in-life career change by taking a rather low-level job in the industry they were trying to break into. This ranges from film effects/editing to computer security. Don't be afraid of some drudgery in order to get your face in front of the right people.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:10 AM
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Look, a 'creative mindset' and 'radical creativity' are not salable commodities. You need a tangible item to pitch. What have you got?
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:17 AM
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Do you have interesting ideas or are you building actual items? There's a vast difference between coming up with an idea like "How about a spaceship that travels faster than the speed of light" and having a set of blueprints for building such a ship.

If you have interesting new ideas but haven't nailed down the technology, I'd suggest you consider writing science fiction. That's a genre where the idea itself is central.

Of course, ideas for new technology alone isn't enough (as I'm sure any of the authors on this board could tell you). You also need to know how to develop plots and characters and have some writing skills.
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Old 01-19-2019, 12:14 PM
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The evidence of the past OPs of yours and your responses are good basis for such impressions and such conclusions.
No, they aren't. You barely know anything about me. I will give you that there may be enough information for you to take guesses at, or that there may be red flags such as "Some of the people who talk in ways you talk aren't hard workers," but you don't act like you're guessing. You take it the point of defamatory absolution. If I were to post racial slurs and cursing at someone on the board without even any cause, would that be allowed? Why are personal attacks on my character, work-ethic, etc, based on vague patterns and absolutely zero exposure/experience to me in a work/project environment, any better than foul language that would get someone immediately banned?

Do you want to take a look at some of my online projects? Am I allowed to post links? I don't want to sound like I'm spamming the board but I'm sick of your rabid attacks that I'm not fruitful.

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I know quite a few successful people who initiated a later-in-life career change by taking a rather low-level job in the industry they were trying to break into. This ranges from film effects/editing to computer security. Don't be afraid of some drudgery in order to get your face in front of the right people.
That's fair and your advice duly noted. The rub is that in my specific case, there are very few "low-level" positions that are a good fit for my braintype. I can't just roll pennies; I'll go crazy and kill someone. I have to be EXTREMELY creatively enganged. There are plenty of hard-working extremely creative people.

A CEO or entrepreneur isn't someone who's lucky or just hard-working. It's often a specific type of person/mindtype. The CEO role has been (loosely) linked in psychology to psychopathic behavior. So if you're a psychopath and you want to use your skillset productively, you may be specifically fitted to be a CEO and not much else. A paradox for you: what would a "low-level CEO" be?

The bigger problem with your advice in this situation is that I want to go into a very new field (AR/MR). There's no AR/MR outlet down my street hiring. The ideas I have are for the very direction of these fields themselves so I need to be in a high-level position for my evil plans to work.

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Look, a 'creative mindset' and 'radical creativity' are not salable commodities. You need a tangible item to pitch. What have you got?
I have several years of groundwork (6 years part-time work) on an athletic AR/MR solution/application, in the form of various mediums: patent drafting, textual specifications, descriptions, enticing seminar-like videos, explanatory webpages, and hundreds of concept images. I know that's pretty vague but I don't have a patent yet so I can't really share the details publicly.
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Old 01-19-2019, 12:57 PM
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Do you have interesting ideas or are you building actual items? There's a vast difference between coming up with an idea like "How about a spaceship that travels faster than the speed of light" and having a set of blueprints for building such a ship.
Here's the really interesting thing about what you're saying; everyone, listen up!...

XR (an umbrella term for AR/MR/VR) will soon be powerful/portable enough where we'll basically be able to SEE and HEAR anything all around us as if it were real. Think Matrix or Inception.

The further XR gets, the closer we get to bringing sci-fi (or anything fathomable) into reality. This is a breeding ground for creative minds where fiction and reality will meet. So let's say I have an idea for a spaceship, do I draw it and call it art/fiction, or do I technically design it and patent its functioning and then find a way to bring that functioning to life as we see and hear and walk through, the spaceship?

My plan is to get people in XR to notice the one idea I have developed/executed enough for it to be considered a working project (the "athletic" application I mentioned with 6 yrs groundwork), in combination with a general take on my creative mindset and way I think up things, and use all that as a springboard to either continue working on just that one project, or also bring in other XR projects that I'm just now barely outlining but I that I think will inspire just the right people if I can just get them to watch and respond to the promo videos I'm making for them.

I'm trying to make custom promo videos for each entity I approach but this is very time-consuming. I don't really know how else to show I'm interested in a potential partnership than to show initiative researching the person I'm pitching (vidchting?) to.
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Old 01-19-2019, 01:35 PM
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This is SO not how the real world works. Good Luck. I'm out.
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Old 01-19-2019, 01:43 PM
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Maybe I'm wrong about this field, but why can't you just self-market your ideas/implementations on YouTube? Join forums in the XR community and ask for critiques? If your ideas and creations are as good as you claim, someone will notice and seek you out for employment.
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Old 01-19-2019, 01:43 PM
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My plan is to get people in XR to notice the one idea I have developed/executed enough for it to be considered a working project
How far along have you got on the project (free running video) that you mentioned in the other thread? Were you able to produce anything that could be considered a finished product? What's your track record for actually producing a demo reel?
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Old 01-19-2019, 01:57 PM
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XR (an umbrella term for AR/MR/VR) will soon be powerful/portable enough where we'll basically be able to SEE and HEAR anything all around us as if it were real. Think Matrix or Inception.

Ya think so?


Quote:
or also bring in other XR projects that I'm just now barely outlining but I that I think will inspire just the right people if I can just get them to watch and respond to the promo videos I'm making for them.

If you have some basic VR idea that hasn't already been extensively talked and written about 20 years ago, I'll eat an Oculus Rift.
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:02 PM
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Oh, and speaking of 20 years, if you want to break into the programming/tech word, it will help for you to become 20 years younger. Getting into this at 39 is like a desk-jockey trying out for the NFL at 39.
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:43 PM
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Oh, and speaking of 20 years, if you want to break into the programming/tech word, it will help for you to become 20 years younger. Getting into this at 39 is like a desk-jockey trying out for the NFL at 39.
While the tech/programming sector may skew young, why would being 39 be as much of an impediment for an ordinary knowledge worker as it is for elite athlete?
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:47 PM
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No, they aren't.
For our purposes, they are.
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You barely know anything about me.
There is ample evidence that you have certain quite evident personality issues in communication that show clearly in your communication here.
  #29  
Old 01-19-2019, 03:00 PM
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If you have some basic VR idea that hasn't already been extensively talked and written about 20 years ago, I'll eat an Oculus Rift.
This. Any technical paper in computer science and engineering, at least, starts with a section on previous work. Of which there is usually tons, especially for hot topics. And here companies probably have internal proprietary development projects covering lots of the good ideas.
That's why tech companies don't talk to external inventors, who will just claim their great idea has been stolen - even if the company had been working on something similar for a year or two before.
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Old 01-19-2019, 03:50 PM
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How about a VR program that simulates really killing it in a marketing pitch? Hungry for apples?
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Old 01-19-2019, 04:33 PM
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Why do people on SD unfairly project grandeur onto me when I talk about having a radically creative mindset?
Perhaps it's because you want people to call you "squish7" on the internet?
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Old 01-19-2019, 04:57 PM
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This is SO not how the real world works.
Why should someone prorammed to change the way the real world works, want to fit into the world exactly as it is today? What's the standard process/formula/protocol for identifying/assimilating world-bending creativity?

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why can't you just self-market your ideas/implementations on YouTube? Join forums in the XR community and ask for critiques?
Simple, lack of IP protection. I want to be in a position to patent my ideas before releasing. I'll keep your suggested route in mind, though, thank you! Keep in mind, just because people have made software/games/etc for decades without patents in place (or only very rarely) doesn't mean that it wouldn't have been a good idea. Mechanics like Tetris, or the functioning of a lot of software, are intrinsically patentable. It's just the software community hasn't really gotten in the habit of protecting in that manner. It's a sad paradox that I can't rant about the specifics of my ideas and protect them at the same time.

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If you have some basic VR idea that hasn't already been extensively talked and written about 20 years ago, I'll eat an Oculus Rift.
A) I'm very hesitant to post in a public forum before I have I.P. protection. This is something you should all understand.
B) You're very XR-shortsighted (as are your linked articles). There are as many XR applications as there are potential paintings, novels, patents, games, products, or companies. Do you think that back when we had just Pong/Arkanoid that we had already covered all possible computer-games or all methods of making computer-games? Back then you might have said "Well there's nothing left for computer games to do, we've made them all". Tip: Think of Inception (imagine that's XR tech), where the characters bring anything they can think of into reality. Do you think VR theorists have really covered all those bases? Everything someone can possibly see and hear and feel?

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How far along have you got on the project (free running video) that you mentioned in the other thread? Were you able to produce anything that could be considered a finished product? What's your track record for actually producing a demo reel?
To be surgical yet succinct, let's suppose that the conglomerate project I was talking about in that long thread consisted of 3 things, 2 of which I'm keeping and one of which I'm discarding:
1) My main "athletic XR" invention (ongoing)
2) My drive to integrate my work with parkour/freerunning ("PK"/"FR") and impress certain circles of players in those fields (ongoing)
3) specific elements of fiction (frozen/tabled indefinitely)

We might say I want to be the guy who brings XR to parkour.

Now that the details aren't cleared up whatsoever, to your more important general question of whether I finish things or have a track record to speak of, the really honest answer is that someone would have to take a lot of time to examine what I've already done, in order to figure that out. Am I allowed to post links to my personal projects on this board? Because I'll link to stuff if you want to see for yourself. It's not exactly relevant though to where I'm heading (XR), and neither will someone in XR care a whole lot about what I've done thus far.

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Oh, and speaking of 20 years, if you want to break into the programming/tech word, it will help for you to become 20 years younger. Getting into this at 39 is like a desk-jockey trying out for the NFL at 39.
I have 1-2 years college education in computer-science (and music). I've had my head in the game my whole life; I'm not starting fresh. I'm not fluent in any specific language right now; my core is to generate more general things, like concepts that will inspire someone else to create a computer language to help fulfil.

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That's why tech companies don't talk to external inventors, who will just claim their great idea has been stolen
This is a huge problem-area for me; do you have any creative advice on solving this issue?
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Old 01-19-2019, 05:11 PM
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Why should someone prorammed to change the way the real world works, want to fit into the world exactly as it is today? What's the standard process/formula/protocol for identifying/assimilating world-bending creativity?
Yeah, we're the arrogant ones in this conversation, not you
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Old 01-19-2019, 05:25 PM
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(snip)
The bigger problem with your advice in this situation is that I want to go into a very new field (AR/MR). There's no AR/MR outlet down my street hiring. The ideas I have are for the very direction of these fields themselves so I need to be in a high-level position for my evil plans to work.
(snip)
Dude, it sounds like you want enter this field and go directly to the top, without having to do any of the low-level drudgery you need to build a reputation in the industry. The only way I know of to do this is to start your own company. It might not seem fair that you can't get past the doorway demons to show your work to the leaders of the field, but that, alas, is how the world works.
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Old 01-19-2019, 05:40 PM
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How about a VR program that simulates really killing it in a marketing pitch? Hungry for apples?
You could win an Appley award for that quality of work.
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:10 PM
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It seems to me this is the same as the past threads. His obsession and self perception is not going to be moved by any rational feedback.
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:21 PM
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Mechanics like Tetris, or the functioning of a lot of software, are intrinsically patentable. It's just the software community hasn't really gotten in the habit of protecting in that manner. It's a sad paradox that I can't rant about the specifics of my ideas and protect them at the same time.
Rant:
The problem with software patents is that there are few unique problems that aren't being by solved daily by technical people all over the planet. Most skilled technical people are churning through problems so rapidly and are aware of the various alternatives that the thought of patenting something doesn't really seem to apply.

I'm sure there are some things in software that most skilled technical people would agree rises above the noise to a level of creative problem solving beyond the normal that would warrant a patent. But, IMO, that number is probably many orders of magnitude smaller than what passes for patents.


Quote:
Back then you might have said "Well there's nothing left for computer games to do, we've made them all".
I think it's the opposite. The ideas flow far more rapidly than the tech moves along.

In my experience, ideas are common, the real talent is bringing it all together at the right time, cost, market, specific details that resonate with current culture, etc. It's more about the execution than the idea.

For example, the movie Good Will Hunting was a good movie (IMO), but it's not the idea that there is a troubled genius that makes it good, the story could have been almost anything. The reason the story is good has more to do how they put together the details to make a story where you care about the main character and there is some personal growth etc.


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Am I allowed to post links to my personal projects on this board? Because I'll link to stuff if you want to see for yourself.
I would be interested in checking it out if you either link to it or PM me. I'm a creative guy and it's fun to see what other people are up to.
  #38  
Old 01-19-2019, 07:18 PM
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This is a huge problem-area for me; do you have any creative advice on solving this issue?
Screenwriters have a similar problem. Studios will return unsolicited scripts unopened. The way they solve it is to get agents who are trusted by the studios, and go through them.
The way we do it in tech is to pitch your idea to a venture capitalist, with an NDA. If the VC thinks it is viable, he can get you enough money to get it implemented. You'll also get feedback.
Once you get it implemented, even imperfectly, and if it is good enough, some company will buy yours. You'll get ton of money, the VC will, and you will be able to get even more resources inside the company. EDA companies and drug companies do this all the time.
The other solution, as suggested above, is to get hired and then push your idea from the inside. But if it doesn't match the direction of the company it might be really hard to get time and resources to do it. Google gives its people 10% of their time to work on new ideas, but that isn't common.
I got to work on new ideas because I worked on research and advanced development when starting out, but I don't think you have the credentials to get hired by Microsoft Research or the like. That doesn't mean that your ideas aren't good, just that research divisions mostly hire PhDs from top schools.
Where I live in Silicon Valley getting to a VC isn't hard, assuming you have a good network. I don't know where you are - but if you can sell it to someone with money, just as good.
  #39  
Old 01-19-2019, 07:28 PM
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Rant:
The problem with software patents is that there are few unique problems that aren't being by solved daily by technical people all over the planet. Most skilled technical people are churning through problems so rapidly and are aware of the various alternatives that the thought of patenting something doesn't really seem to apply.

I'm sure there are some things in software that most skilled technical people would agree rises above the noise to a level of creative problem solving beyond the normal that would warrant a patent. But, IMO, that number is probably many orders of magnitude smaller than what passes for patents.
I have four patents which are kind of software patents, and they are all bullshit. (I did get nice plaques for two and some money for the other two.) And I agree. Software people don't keep patent notebooks, and there is prior art (unpublished) for almost any innovation. Since applying for patents is lengthy and expensive and probably wouldn't even hold up almost no one does it unless a company is building a patent portfolio for trading.
I think that if the Patent office invalidated pretty much all software patents we'd be better off. And it has gotten worse. When I was at Bell Labs when someone in my group applied for a patent, the examiner would always come up with prior art, and we had to explain why that wasn't valid. When I applied for patents after leaving the examiner just let them through. I think the patent office is funded by application fees now, so they have no incentive for not maximizing their income unless the prior art is blatant.
So, Rant + 1
OP - don't even think about patenting your stuff.
  #40  
Old 01-19-2019, 07:55 PM
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We might say I want to be the guy who brings XR to parkour.

1.) We already have the basics of this in recorded/CG scenery for stationary bikes and treadmills. Prior art.


2.) I'd think with parkour, which involves rapid movement through complex terrain, seeing things that aren't there would be a very bad idea. Hope you have plenty of liability insurance.


3.) Couldn't you be the guy who brings XR to hula-hoops, Cabbage Patch Kids, or pet rocks?
  #41  
Old 01-19-2019, 08:05 PM
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3.) Couldn't you be the guy who brings XR to hula-hoops, Cabbage Patch Kids, or pet rocks?
Or Alf (now in Pog Form).
  #42  
Old 01-19-2019, 10:46 PM
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Here's the really interesting thing about what you're saying; everyone, listen up!...

XR (an umbrella term for AR/MR/VR) will soon be powerful/portable enough where we'll basically be able to SEE and HEAR anything all around us as if it were real. Think Matrix or Inception.

The further XR gets, the closer we get to bringing sci-fi (or anything fathomable) into reality. This is a breeding ground for creative minds where fiction and reality will meet. So let's say I have an idea for a spaceship, do I draw it and call it art/fiction, or do I technically design it and patent its functioning and then find a way to bring that functioning to life as we see and hear and walk through, the spaceship?

My plan is to get people in XR to notice the one idea I have developed/executed enough for it to be considered a working project (the "athletic" application I mentioned with 6 yrs groundwork), in combination with a general take on my creative mindset and way I think up things, and use all that as a springboard to either continue working on just that one project, or also bring in other XR projects that I'm just now barely outlining but I that I think will inspire just the right people if I can just get them to watch and respond to the promo videos I'm making for them.

I'm trying to make custom promo videos for each entity I approach but this is very time-consuming. I don't really know how else to show I'm interested in a potential partnership than to show initiative researching the person I'm pitching (vidchting?) to.
No, I think you've missed the point I was making.

Having a 3D XR/AR/MR/VR video walk-through tour of a spaceship is not the same as having a spaceship.
  #43  
Old 01-19-2019, 11:18 PM
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Like others have mentioned, ideas are a dime a dozen. The genius and brilliance comes with turning them into reality. For every genius groundbreaking product thats out there there was probably hundreds of people who already had the same idea years before it became something real.
Apple didnít invent the idea of the iPad, they took the idea many people had for years and made it real.
You want others to apply their genius and brilliance to bring your idea into reality. It just doesnít work that way.
  #44  
Old 01-20-2019, 07:37 AM
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Sadly ideas are worth nothing...

Here in the UK, we have an investment TV program called Dragon's Den.
The US equivalent is Shark Tank.

Both these programs feature investors who can offer huge sums of money, plus decades of business experience.

If you turn up with a working product, you could get an investment and become a millionaire.

If you turn up with just an idea, you get nothing.
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  #45  
Old 01-20-2019, 09:27 AM
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While the tech/programming sector may skew young, why would being 39 be as much of an impediment for an ordinary knowledge worker as it is for elite athlete?
The problem is, squish7 is not content with being an ordinary knowledge worker -- he/she wants to pitch "world-bending" ideas to "the giants of the field".

Brain plasticity and mental stamina do degrade with age -- slowly at first, but it starts to become definitely measurable around age 40. However, that is probably not the main reason why the odds are against someone coming up with their first invention / scientific discovery / artistic masterpiece at age 39.

The main reason why that rarely happens is this: if you really had the potential to do that, why didn't you do it already? You've had at least 20 years to show the world what an exceptional kind of person you are. If you didn't produce anything noteworthy during those 20 years, why should anybody expect your next 20 years to be different?

"Late bloomer" artists, inventors etc do exist, but they are very much the exception rather than the rule. Even when someone came up with their great masterpiece at a later age, there's usually something in their younger years which shows that they were already no ordinary bear. A physicist may get the Nobel Prize at age 60 for a discovery they made at age 42, but when you read their biography you'll probably find that they had already written some important papers and built up an impressive reputation in the international physics community by age 30. And that early reputation then earned them the access to people, budgets etc which enabled them to make the big discovery.

So when someone is pushing 40 and admits that they have "zero credentials; no successes or work history to speak of", that tends to make people go "hmm" when that person then claims to have "world-bending" creative and inspirational abilities.

When I gave my advice to squish7 in my previous post to this thread, I didn't know their age yet and was picturing them as an ambitious twentysomething. At that age, it is still very likely that your claims of being a world-changing creative genius are delusional, but you should at least be given a chance to show the naysayers that they're wrong. But if you have been an adult for two decades already and you still have "no successes or work history to speak of", maybe it's time to adjust your ambitions a bit and consider the possibility that you're not as brilliant as you thought you were.

Still, that doesn't change my advice to become an industry insider by doing some more modest projects first, instead of attempting to jump straight to the top. The advantage of that approach is that it's not an all-or-nothing gamble: you may still end up having a satisfying and profitable career in an interesting field, even if you have to eventually make peace with the fact that you turned out not to be the next reincarnation of Shakespeare.
  #46  
Old 01-20-2019, 10:04 AM
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By the way, squish7, if you have a concrete idea which you believe you will be able to execute if given a budget, you may want to look into a "startup accelerator" such as Y Combinator. You pitch your idea to them, and if you can convince them that the idea is viable and that you have what it takes to execute it, they give you a budget to work on it. They can also bring you into contact with industry insiders and with potential investors for the next funding round. In exchange, they'll want a seat on the board and a certain percentage of the revenues, if your startup company becomes successful.

Y Combinator expects their startup founders to move to Silicon Valley, but you may be able to find another startup accelerator closer to home. Just google "startup accelerator" plus the name of the nearest large city. Or maybe decide that you are willing to move if that's what it takes to bring your world-bending ideas to fruition.

Also note that they'll expect you to do the majority of the work yourself; you can't just give them the idea, let them do all the work of executing it, and get a big bag of money for coming up with the idea. Also, most startup accelerators tend to be very wary of "loner" startup founders; a group of two to five people willing to commit themselves to the project will have a much better chance of getting funding than a single individual. I think Paul Graham, the founder of Y Combinator, said somewhere "if you cannot convince even a single friend that you and your idea are worth taking a gamble on, then why should we believe differently?"

Last edited by Walton Firm; 01-20-2019 at 10:05 AM.
  #47  
Old 01-20-2019, 10:10 AM
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Walton,

Thanks for the explanation. It makes sense. I agree that squish7 might want to start on modest projects first.

You mentioned late bloomer scientists in detail and I'm wondering about late bloomer artists. What can we often see in their past?
  #48  
Old 01-20-2019, 10:52 AM
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I'm not an expert, but certainly there are lots of examples from history of famous artists showing their talents at a very early age. Mozart was composing symphonies at the age of 4 which were better than what many adults would ever produce with a lifetime of practice; Picasso produced this at age 13. Michelangelo created the Pieta in his early twenties and the statue of David in his late twenties. (And presumably he didn't buy a huge block of marble with his own pocket money, so he must have built up a reputation before that already, in order to be given that chance.)

I'm not an art historian, so I can't say for sure how representative these examples are. I guess producing master-level works at age 4 is earlier than the norm, but making your big breakthrough after 30 would be unusually late. I googled "late blooming artists" and pretty much all the examples I could find were either people whose first great work came in their early thirties, or people who had some modest early successes but only broke through later in life. But in all the cases I could find in my quick search, those people were at least already "in the field" by the time of their 30th birthday. Famous rock bands generally started as teenagers. I'm sure exceptions exist, but they will definitely be exceptions and not the norm.

Novelist appears to be the field where being a late-bloomer is most common. J.K. Rowling was a random unemployed nobody until she published the first Harry Potter novel at age 30. Quite a few famous novelists were well past 40 when they made their debut; some of them were already acclaimed journalists or something like that, but others had unremarkable careers in an unrelated field before they suddenly burst onto the bestseller lists. I guess this has something to do with the fact that the basic "technology" of novel-writing hasn't changed much over the centuries, so a person who writes their first bestseller at 50 has probably been at least a voracious reader since childhood. Harder to do that with a new form of art for which the technology has only existed for a few years.
  #49  
Old 01-20-2019, 10:54 AM
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I agree that squish7 might want to start on modest projects first.
Excellent advice. If you really have a hundred ideas, pick one of them that can be easily developed - and develop it into a prototype.

Being able to show up with one real product in your hand is going to impress investors a lot more than showing up with a hundred ideas.
  #50  
Old 01-20-2019, 11:11 AM
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Also note that they'll expect you to do the majority of the work yourself; you can't just give them the idea, let them do all the work of executing it, and get a big bag of money for coming up with the idea. Also, most startup accelerators tend to be very wary of "loner" startup founders; a group of two to five people willing to commit themselves to the project will have a much better chance of getting funding than a single individual. I think Paul Graham, the founder of Y Combinator, said somewhere "if you cannot convince even a single friend that you and your idea are worth taking a gamble on, then why should we believe differently?"
emphasis added
Yes. In my real life work, I have worked in the past on the risk investing and still do sometimes for some aspects of my work.
The start-up idea by the loner is one of the surest red-flags as it a very large risk factor and tends to signal the person has problems working in a team or communicating effectively with a team - which in almost all these endeavors is a critical difference between a project failure and a project success.

the mere having of supposedly transformative ideas is not worth a single Ä, even if true as the practical transformation into a marketable product in these fields (not the solo artistic creation like a painting or a novel, a different challenge) requires a focus, an ability to engage.

the mode of communication and the reaction to any feedback that does not fit his own desired response, seen here and in the prior threads does not give confidence.
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