PDA

View Full Version : treacheotomy


DuhCow
01-20-2005, 02:09 PM
can you talk with a treacheotomy tube in your neck?

Triskadecamus
01-20-2005, 02:13 PM
If you can talk, no one should give you a tracheotomy!

Tris

Indyellen
01-20-2005, 02:25 PM
can you talk with a treacheotomy tube in your neck?

IANAD, but I work for an ENT-Surgery practice. I know that it is possible to do so, but somehow the valve must be blocked in order for the patient to vocalize. There are also special "speaking" valves/tubes for tracheotomy patients. Most of the patients I've dealt with here (where there is a speech issue) are laryngectomy patients and they require a special prosthesis or speech-aid device in order to vocalize.

But the simple answer is yes, it is possible. It might take practice, but it is possible. In addition, here is a very good website addressing the issue:

Speech with a Tracheostomy (http://www.tracheostomy.com/speech.htm)

Hope this helps!

Qadgop the Mercotan
01-20-2005, 02:45 PM
If you can talk, no one should give you a tracheotomy!
Tris
And just what is your reasoning behind that statement?

QtM, MD

jayjay
01-20-2005, 02:51 PM
And just what is your reasoning behind that statement?

QtM, MD

He may be going on the assumption that tracheotomies are performed to relieve a blockage of the trachea that wouldn't otherwise be reparable, thus if you can speak, you have airway, and a tracheotomy isn't necessary.

Of course (though it took me a second to think it through) there are other reasons for a tracheotomy than simply to establish an emergency airway in extremis. But, like I said, that was my first impression as well.

BarnOwl
01-20-2005, 03:15 PM
In Gtmo, we had to admit a merchant mariner who, while aboard his merchant ship, fell down a ladder, broke both arms and suffered a fractured skull, as well.

In addition to all the other treatment the doctors administered, they also did a tracheostomy on this patient.

So afterwards, there he lay in his bunk recovering uneventfully, with each arm in a cast and extended more or less straight out - not bent at the elbow.

So, when the man wanted to talk, a corpsman would have to put his finger over the opening in the surgical airway. But this guy turned out to be such a pain in the ass, the corpsman often ignored his "I want to talk" signals so they wouldn't have to listen to his bitching.

I know, it sounds awful, but it was funny, nevertheless.

BarnOwl
01-20-2005, 03:21 PM
In Gtmo, we had to admit a mariner who, while aboard his merchant ship, fell down a ladder, broke both arms and suffered a fractured skull, as well.

In addition to all the other treatment the doctors administrered, they also did a tracheostomy on this patient.

So afterwards, there he lay in his bed recovering uneventfully, with each arm in a cast and extended more or less straight out - not bent at the elbow as you might expect.

The problem was that when the man needed to speak, a corpsman would have to put his own finger over the opening in the surgical airway. But this guy turned out to be such a pain in the ass, the corpsmen often ignored his "I want to talk" signals so they wouldn't have to listen to his bitching.

I know, it sounds awful, but it was funny, nevertheless.

danceswithcats
01-20-2005, 03:36 PM
Having been trached after my accident, it was part of the learning curve to stick a finger over the hole so I could speak. It was also nice to get that darn thing out because it caused a near constant tickle in my throat.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.