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andygirl
01-23-2005, 07:04 PM
For Christmas I acquired my departed grandmother's old cast iron skillets, which spent the past few years in my family's garage. As you might imagine, they have spots of rust on them. Any tips on a good way to get the rust off? And what's a preferred method of seasoning?

SteveG1
01-23-2005, 09:17 PM
Scrub it real good. Use a copper scratcher or steel wool to wear away the rust. After you get it clean and good looking, dry it immediately. Cleaning is done. Next, get some cooking oil or shortening. Heat it up on the stove and "swish" it around to get an even coating, nice and hot, but don't let it burn. Then, after it cools enough, start wiping with a dry paper towel. Keep doing this until the paper towels are not "icky" anymore. Done.

MsRobyn
01-23-2005, 09:35 PM
Make sure that whatever fat you use to season the cookware doesn't have salt. Vegetable oil or Crisco work best.

Here are the directions for seasoning cast-iron cookware.

Robin

MsRobyn
01-23-2005, 09:54 PM
Let's try that link again, shall we? (http://www.lodgemfg.com/usecare1.asp)

Robin

silenus
01-23-2005, 09:55 PM
Lucky you. With a little care, you will be passing those skillets down to your grandchildren!

Myron Van Horowitzski
01-24-2005, 01:37 PM
I used my gas grill to season a dutch oven. I just rubbed the piece all over with Crisco and put in there on high. Every few minutes I rubbed on some more and turned it over. The first coating will look like it's burnt off at first, but I kept rubbing on more Crisco to build up the coating.

After about 20 minutes I had a shiny black finish, inside and out, plus I didn't smoke up the house at all.

We use it camping and every spring I reseason it a bit.

andygirl
01-24-2005, 03:57 PM
Lucky you. With a little care, you will be passing those skillets down to your grandchildren!

That's the hope. And hey, I like the idea of running around with it chasing after someone who has offended me.

LionelHutz405
01-25-2005, 10:40 AM
Make sure that whatever fat you use to season the cookware doesn't have salt. Vegetable oil or Crisco work best.

Doesnít have salt? Díoh. Thatís what Iíve been using to clean mine. Iím sure I read that somewhere. That site says to use soap and water. I thought soap was the big no no.

Spoke
01-25-2005, 10:48 AM
That's the hope. And hey, I like the idea of running around with it chasing after someone who has offended me.


No, no. That's what your rolling pin is for! Please use the right tool for the job! ;)

Trunk
01-25-2005, 10:59 AM
Doesnít have salt? Díoh. Thatís what Iíve been using to clean mine. Iím sure I read that somewhere. That site says to use soap and water. I thought soap was the big no no.

That's what some say, but I always use it. I soap and scrub it out, dry it immediately and then coat with crisco until the next time I use it.

Usually the next time I use it, I just put it on the burner or in the over and use the crisco to cook in.

Both of my cast iron pieces are in great shape, more non-stick than my non-stick stuff, and get better with age.

Sometimes, if I just cooked an egg, I just wipe it out, rub crisco in it again and put it back in the cupboard.

Myron Van Horowitzski
01-25-2005, 02:36 PM
That's the hope. And hey, I like the idea of running around with it chasing after someone who has offended me.

My sister got a set of three sizes this Christmas. Hubby piped up that she should call them "mad," "madder" and "maddest"


-Myra

butler1850
01-25-2005, 02:37 PM
The lodge site says to use soap on (I suspect) the new, unseasoned skillets.

Though.... I love my cast iron, I cook enough in them to not worry about seasoning coming off, so I do use soap to lightly clean after use. Scrape out any solid bits, a quick scrub with the sponge and some soap, then I spray with Pam spray (generic version) and put back into the closet. Use salt if you're afraid of the soap, but be sure to DRY IMMEDIATELY... salty water is bad for cast iron.

For treating new stuff, as mentioned before, coat liberally with Crisco, or some unsalted pure vegetable based oil. Heat in the oven upside down at 350F for about an hour, let cool, and repeat. You could just add more oil, but I like to think that the heat/cool cycles allow the "pores" to absorb more of the oils.

Once you get it nice and black, it's better than teflon!

Good luck, once you've scrubbed yours clean, and gotten them "up to snuff", you'll fall in love with your skillets, just as the rest of us have! :D :D

The Mermaid
01-25-2005, 08:40 PM
I have a bunch of cast iron cookware and use it daily. Black is where it's at. I usually rrinse or scrub with soap and water. The key is not to let them soak. And never put them in the dishwasher. My daughter's college room mates did that several times :eek:

I got a lodge griddle/grill (https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/product1.asp?menu=logic&idProduct=3943) this summer down in Gatlinburg (they have an outlet store there).

I've seasoned it pretty good but it's not quite there yet. Still it's great to be able to fry 6 pancakes at a time.

andygirl
01-25-2005, 11:57 PM
No, no. That's what your rolling pin is for! Please use the right tool for the job! ;)

I confess that I also have run around and chased people with a hockey stick, a baseball bat, a cleaver, and a hammer.

Fortunately I have little legs.

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