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Tuckerfan
04-06-2005, 12:55 AM
Commie-pinko rip off of Star Trek. (http://www.stim.com/Stim-x/0996September/Automedia/soviet.html)Although Russia's science-fiction tradition predates Jules Verne, "Cosmos Patrol" is "Star Trek" in Marxist-Leninist drag. Consider the similarities: "Cosmos Patrol" takes place in the 23rd century aboard a large galaxy-cruising spaceship called the Red Adventurer (Krasny Avantyurist). Like the Starship Enterprise, the Red Adventurer is on a long-term mission of exploration on behalf of the Commonwealth of Independent Star Systems. Both ships are manned by some 400 brave and able crewmen and -women. Both ships encounter strange alien beings and bizarre celestial phenomena week after week. Both ships boast a dashing commander at their helm, with an overly intellectual first officer by his side. And both shows feature cheap special effects and odd velour uniforms.The episode descriptions are hysterical!

Marley23
04-06-2005, 05:28 AM
What kind of a dope do you have to be to make Star Trek MORE Communist??

Scissorjack
04-06-2005, 06:08 AM
I'd rather eat a Kvassian bivalve.

Alessan
04-06-2005, 06:09 AM
I'd rather eat a Kvassian bivalve.

And you have!

DoctorJ
04-06-2005, 06:52 AM
Do they have a guy on the bridge who speaks in a ridiculous American accent? One who talks about the "enemy vessels"?

Paul in Qatar
04-06-2005, 07:49 AM
I know nothing of this but in early April I always suspect some sort of prank.

Kent Clark
04-06-2005, 09:26 AM
I know nothing of this but in early April I always suspect some sort of prank.

I was willing to be convinced until I scrolled down to the photo from the alleged show.

[geekhat=on] Doesn't that hand weapon look a little TOO much like a phaser? [geekhat=off]

silenus
04-06-2005, 10:32 AM
It's a joke.

http://www.suchland.com/craig/archives/000102.asp

Paul in Qatar
04-06-2005, 12:10 PM
I hate 1 April in the English-speaking world. Really I do.

LonesomePolecat
04-06-2005, 02:09 PM
Raises an interesting question, though--what is TV science fiction like in the rest of the world? I'm only aware of three such programs, all British: Dr. Who, Space: 1999, and Quadermas. I suppose Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy might also count, though I think of it more as a comedy. There's a lot of animated stuff from Japan that could reasonably be considered SF, I guess. Other than that, I'm out of ideas.

But what about France or Germany? Spain, Italy, Turkey, Poland? India? Rashak Mani, good buddy, do they do SF on the airwaves down in Brazil?

Tuckerfan
04-06-2005, 03:07 PM
Raises an interesting question, though--what is TV science fiction like in the rest of the world? I'm only aware of three such programs, all British: Dr. Who, Space: 1999, and Quadermas. I suppose Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy might also count, though I think of it more as a comedy. There's a lot of animated stuff from Japan that could reasonably be considered SF, I guess. Other than that, I'm out of ideas.

But what about France or Germany? Spain, Italy, Turkey, Poland? India? Rashak Mani, good buddy, do they do SF on the airwaves down in Brazil?
There's been a couple of links on the board to Indian film versions of Superman (complete with photos of the dancing girls) and someone in the same thread linked to a Turkish rip-off of Star Trek. That one was so blatent that the producers could have easily been sued for infringement.

Ponder Stibbons
04-06-2005, 03:11 PM
It's a joke.
Too bad. I wanted to hear more about "the Soviets' effort to create a wacky comedy about seven castaways trying to get rescued from a desert island."

kellner
04-06-2005, 03:37 PM
But what about France or Germany?I give you:

Raumpatrouille - Die phantastischen Abenteuer des Raumschiffes Orion
(Space Patrol - The Phantastic Adventures of the Spaceship Orion)

Unfortunately only seven one-hour episodes aired in 1966.

Here are a nice review (http://www.popcultmag.com/oddglimpses/international/orion/orionlog.html), a few pictures (http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/3589/raumpatrouille.html) and a fansite. (http://www.orionspace.de/ww/de/pub/english.htm)

Kent Clark
04-06-2005, 03:50 PM
Too bad. I wanted to hear more about "the Soviets' effort to create a wacky comedy about seven castaways trying to get rescued from a desert island."

That would be Gulag's Island.

Cornelius Tuggerson
04-06-2005, 04:04 PM
I hate 1 April in the English-speaking world. Really I do.
Really? Well try spending it in the Russian speaking world for a change. Those bastards once told us they were going to infuse an elephant egg-cell with mammoth DNA, have an elephant carry out the baby and then repopulate Siberia with mammoths in order to improve the local eco-systems. Do you know how great and exciting that sounds when you are just learning genetics? And then it turned out to be a big fat lie. I am usually a good sport about a well thought out April fools joke, but that just pissed me off. :(

tdn
04-06-2005, 04:07 PM
Although Russia's science-fiction tradition predates Jules Verne, "Cosmos Patrol" is "Star Trek" in Marxist-Leninist drag. Consider the similarities: "Cosmos Patrol" takes place in the 23rd century aboard a large galaxy-cruising spaceship called the Red Adventurer (Krasny Avantyurist). Like the Starship Enterprise, the Red Adventurer is on a long-term mission of exploration on behalf of the Commonwealth of Independent Star Systems. Both ships are manned by some 400 brave and able crewmen and -women. Both ships encounter strange alien beings and bizarre celestial phenomena week after week. Both ships boast a dashing commander at their helm, with an overly intellectual first officer by his side. And both shows feature cheap special effects and odd velour uniforms.

Except in Cosmos Patrol, the guys in the red shirts always live!

Rodd Hill
04-06-2005, 04:26 PM
People's Science Commissar Spock: "Comrade Captain, I regret to report that Comrade Engineer Scottski attempted Trotskyite entryism with Comrade Uhura."

BrainGlutton
04-06-2005, 04:55 PM
Was there ever any real SF on Soviet TV? Or post-Soviet Russian TV?

Lightnin'
04-06-2005, 06:27 PM
Was there ever any real SF on Soviet TV? Or post-Soviet Russian TV?

Probably nothing that had anything to do with black holes.

Just a guess.

Iacob_Matthew
04-06-2005, 10:07 PM
Perhaps one of the weirdest borrowings from Star Trek has Dobraydushev and a reanimated Peter the Great challenging holographic supervillains Adolf Hitler and John D. Rockefeller in a chess tournament—to the death!It's hearing about things like these that make me proud to spend at least an hour a day wasting my life on messageboards like this.

NoCoolUserName
04-06-2005, 10:20 PM
In Russian (I've been told) the phrase "black hole" is a gross obscenity that means exactly what you think it does. But, since it describes the physical reality so exactly, they use it anyway.

:)

Superdude
04-06-2005, 10:29 PM
Probably nothing that had anything to do with black holes.

Just a guess.


Leave Uhura out of this!

detop
04-07-2005, 01:05 AM
When I was living in Moscow last year, I loved to watch reruns of a late-1960s Russian science-fiction TV show called "Kosmicheskaya Militsiya." The title translates as either Space Police or Cosmic Militia, though the show is usually called "Cosmos Patrol" in English. You could say that "Cosmos Patrol" is a lot like "Star Trek," but it would be more accurate to call it a bare-faced Commie rip-off.
(bolding mine)

You know the funny thing is that here in Quebec, the French title for Star Trek TOS is Patrouille du Cosmos.

Scissorjack
04-07-2005, 07:28 AM
Was there ever any real SF on Soviet TV? Or post-Soviet Russian TV?

Tsar Trek

DrFidelius
04-07-2005, 07:46 AM
And here I was almost hoping that someone actually made epsisodes of IKV BortaS .

BrainGlutton
04-07-2005, 09:02 AM
BTW, what's the origin of this "In Soviet Russia, [noun] [verb] you!" catchphrase-formula? Some old Yakov Smirnoff gag?

Cornelius Tuggerson
04-07-2005, 12:33 PM
In Russian (I've been told) the phrase "black hole" is a gross obscenity that means exactly what you think it does.
Not really. Black hole in Russian means the same it means in English. I think the way the rumor you are referring to got started was – a Russian physics professor was righting a paper on the things and thought that calling them black holes was vulgar (him being a smart out-of-this-world type of a guy) so in the paper he referred to them as "black openings" instead, which caused everyone much amusement and created the in-joke of black hole meaning something more then a mysterious celestial body. It may be an urban legend however, I haven't seen a cite for the story anywhere on the web.

Miller
04-07-2005, 01:29 PM
BTW, what's the origin of this "In Soviet Russia, [noun] [verb] you!" catchphrase-formula? Some old Yakov Smirnoff gag?

Gag, nothing. That was pretty much his entire routine.

ElvisL1ves
04-07-2005, 01:45 PM
Smirnoff's entire routine: "America is totally different from Soviet Russia. In America, you can always find party. In Russia, Party always finds you!"

He's still packing 'em in down in Branson.

Ranchoth
04-07-2005, 05:53 PM
This part intrigued me...

I hadn't a clue about this one—until I learned this fun fact: the Red Army used to award medals for bravery to tanks and airplanes.

:dubious:

Now that part's a joke too, right? Or did the author throw in a genuine bit of weird Red Army trivia? (I'd guess "joke," but with Soviet stuff, I can never be completely sure...)

Tuckerfan
04-07-2005, 06:23 PM
This part intrigued me...



:dubious:

Now that part's a joke too, right? Or did the author throw in a genuine bit of weird Red Army trivia? (I'd guess "joke," but with Soviet stuff, I can never be completely sure...)Actually, I think that it is true. ISTR that a certain model tank got the medal.

Walloon
04-07-2005, 10:39 PM
What's with the apostrophe in Star's?

Superdude
04-07-2005, 10:40 PM
In Russia, apostrophe withs YOU!

Tuckerfan
04-12-2005, 03:58 AM
Apparently, though, there's commie-pinkos (http://www.stardestroyer.net/Empire/Essays/Trek-Marxism.html) running the UFP.No wealth: Counsellor Troi and Captain Picard have both boasted about how the accumulation of wealth is no longer an incentive. What they don't explain is why. Humans have always been territorial (and so have our evolutionary ancestors), so our desire to accumulate more assets seems more like a basic facet of human nature than a temporary cultural phenomenon. It can be suppressed or modified through education and social conditioning, but such methods are hardly 100% effective. Some greedy people should remain, but not in Star Trek. So if humans in the future no longer desire wealth, then why not? Do they use extremely advanced brainwashing techniques, so sophisticated that no one can resist them? Or have they made the accumulation of wealth illegal, as Marx advocated? The latter seems more plausible.There's more. A lot more. Somebody has too much time on their hands.

Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor
04-12-2005, 08:11 AM
Apparently, though, there's commie-pinkos (http://www.stardestroyer.net/Empire/Essays/Trek-Marxism.html) running the UFP.There's more. A lot more. Somebody has too much time on their hands.

Food & matter replicator tech would seem to reduce/eliminate the problem of poverty from the bottom up.

Unlimited #s of habitable/terraformable planets solve the living space problems.

Fusion & antimatter for energy.

By Kirk's first tour on Enterprise, gemstones were considered worthless. (Remember the "Halloween" episode?)

Sheer technological muscle would make wealth & poverty alike largely obsolete.

Colophon
04-12-2005, 08:17 AM
In SDMB, "Tsar Trek" joke beat YOU! :(

HPL
04-12-2005, 09:52 AM
Food & matter replicator tech would seem to reduce/eliminate the problem of poverty from the bottom up.

Fusion & antimatter for energy.
.

Exactly. If you have a magic black box(replicators, warp engines, transporters), there's no limit to the things you can do.

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