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CandidGamera
04-07-2005, 08:09 AM
Ta-da!

Back with more later.

Trion
04-07-2005, 08:22 AM
Well, I haven't had a chance to read everything yet. But I will give one quick capsule review.

GLA: Misassembled: No.

shy guy
04-07-2005, 08:26 AM
Green Lantern: Rebirth #5: I was already a big fan of Geoff Johns (when he's not writing Wonder Woman) and this just cements that. Thank god he had the sense to bring Hal back in a way that gave adequate respect to both Hal and Kyle in a story that emphasizes both of their strengths, doesn't treat Kyle like he started superheroing yesterday, and makes both heroes look impressive without downplaying the attributes of either one.

I'm actually looking forward to the new GL series, when I wasn't before. God damn you, DC. You won't be happy until you take all of my money.

Seven Soldiers: Zatana #1: I'll talk about it over in the Seven Soldiers thread.

CandidGamera
04-07-2005, 08:36 AM
GLA : Misassembled : Yes.

Seven Soldiers : Zatanna - I already noted it in the Seven Soldiers thread, for my part.

Superman/Batman : The time-twisting tale wraps up - and while it may have been almost entirely irrelevant, I did get a kick out of the ending sections. Plus, undead Justice League : creepy.

GL : Rebirth - Whoo! I hope Ganthet comes out of this okay. Hal's seldom been written so well - nice to see the return of the ring database, too.

Menocchio
04-07-2005, 08:46 AM
It's spring cleaning time in the DCU, between Countdown Deadshot, and Seven Soldiers, Second Stringers and below had better watch their backs! Not that I'm complaining, mind you. I'm pretty sure at least a few of these guys were already dead, and could be brought back if a creator really wanted them, but most of them were pretty lame and unused anyway. I've no problem clearing the shelves to make room for new ideas.

It was a big week for me, so this one will be in chunks:

GL: Rebirth #5: Great work here. Hal and Kyle both get their props (and it seems the Rann/Thanagar War will feature Kyle, and JLA Jon, so they won't be forgotten). Hal's crimes are mitigated so he's workable as a hero again, but not totally absolved, so there's still an insteresting hook there, and Sinestro was just so cool. I'm still a bit put off by how much a dick Batman is being, but that's not Johns' fault. He's been Hal's designated naysayer since Final Night, at least, and someone has to do it (after all, the guy did destroy the universe), but it seems a bit out of character for Batman. J'onn, Superman, or WW would be better opponents.

GLA: Misassembled #1: I'm a sucker for wacky superhero highjinks. And Monkey Joe. I liked this one. It was fun. Is Deathurge just a black racer knockoff, or is there more to him?

CandidGamera
04-07-2005, 09:18 AM
GL: Rebirth #5: Great work here. Hal and Kyle both get their props (and it seems the Rann/Thanagar War will feature Kyle, and JLA Jon, so they won't be forgotten).

Hal's going to be the GL in the JLA, in short order.

The ongoing GL title will supposedly focus on Hal, but with glimpses of the others.

And apparently, Guy Gardner will be significant this year.

According to Wizard.

Menocchio
04-07-2005, 09:58 AM
Huh. I had heard Jon would still be in JLA, Hal headlining in GL, and Kyle and Guy popping up here and there.

Oh well, Jon still has the Daily Show, at least. (And JLU)

Batman/Superman: Not as cool as the time chaos midway through this story, but a nice wrap up. They went a long way towards dismissing my problems with Batman's violence (it doesn't count, since this will all be undone). Thumbs up.

Zatanna: Comments in 7S thread. Good, but not great.

Y: The Last Man: I did not see that coming. I didn't read any chemistry between those two (at least on 355's part) at all. I kept expecting someone to wake up or something. Well, Safeword had me scratching my head its first issue, too, but it really came around. maybe this will have a better explanation.

Menocchio
04-07-2005, 10:29 AM
More on Y: The real male fantasy here isn't the lesbianism or the fact that Yorick's a valued property, it's that he meets such cool women! Dang! I'd take either Beth, the Cap'n here, or the girl what died in marrisville over any of the hyper-mammoried glamazons from many comics. I'm also digging the fact that the comment way back in the text recap for Vol II that only a couple of nations (Austrailia and one other, IIRC) have female submariners is bearing fruit.

Batman: (last week's) What's up with the Joker? It looks like someone worked him over even before the beating started. Is that from something, or just a comment on how fugitive psychopaths probably wouldn't have the best living conditions. I'm not liking the twist. I think I see where they're going with this (assuming this isn't another illusion or imposter), and it could work, but so could keeping him dead! Somebody had better check Bucky's pulse.

Deadshot: It's over! I don't quite like how everything reset for Lawton, but I suppose it's the only thing that could've worked. Any big lasting changes would have been undone (I suspect that he'll be back in his more classic togs in Villains United) and they've already killed his family once. It was a small and somewhat guilty pleasure, but a pleasure nonetheless.

Cliffy
04-07-2005, 10:35 AM
Ooh, I was five minutes late and the place was closed. Rassum frassum idiots who don't know how to drive! I can't believe I missed a week with Y, Seven Soldiers, and the first Slaine volume! :mad:

--Cliffy

Menocchio
04-07-2005, 10:45 AM
Lex Luthor: Damn you Lex! You're all cool and nuanced, and the art's good, so I like it. But nothing happens, so I don't like it! You have one more issue, and if you don't do anthing by then, I'm dropping you like hot Kryptonite. Are we supposed to recognize the gal in the tank?

CandidGamera
04-07-2005, 10:53 AM
Blood of the Demon : Etrigan's status quo has changed - it seems that's he free of Blood's physical body, but Jason Blood's not out yet, doing his best Martin stein impression and .. well, nagging the demon. Batman shows up.

Speaking of Martin Stein and nagging shared consciousnesses, Firestorm hit the stands this week. Ronnie gives Jason a stern-talking to, and usurps control of their shared form when Jason plays a little rough with some villains. Still meh. Just reading until the Ronnie situation is resolved, a couple more issues..

Fiver
04-07-2005, 12:25 PM
I'm starting to wonder if Brian K. Vaughn of Y: The Last Man is a one-trick pony.

We've already seen the Amazons, the Israelis, the Russians, Culper Ring, Setauket Ring, the ninja women, and now we're learning about yet another secret organization of women who are seeking Yorick and/or Ampersand for their own dark purposes?! Enough, already! Tell another story!

I loved Zatanna, and I'm glad to see the various Seven Soldiers books beginning to cohere.

Menocchio
04-07-2005, 12:32 PM
I'm starting to wonder if Brian K. Vaughn of Y: The Last Man is a one-trick pony.

We've already seen the Amazons, the Israelis, the Russians, Culper Ring, Setauket Ring, the ninja women, and now we're learning about yet another secret organization of women who are seeking Yorick and/or Ampersand for their own dark purposes?! Enough, already! Tell another story!

Yeah, I'm begininng to wonder about that myself. Of course, the obvious other story has him going to Austrailia and closing the dangling Beth plotline, so these ladies don't worry me so much.

Kamino Neko
04-07-2005, 12:58 PM
GLA: Misassembled #1: I'm a sucker for wacky superhero highjinks. And Monkey Joe. I liked this one. It was fun. Is Deathurge just a black racer knockoff, or is there more to him?

I only read the first 7 or 8 pages of GLA (the preview...I'm broke...I take my comics where I can...Mostly previews plus caches of old comics I'm getting off friends.).... But I'm not seeing a lot of resemblance to the Black Racer in Deathurge. Not a HUGE New Gods fan, but every appearance of the Racer I've seen he's just waited for people to die and picking them up. Deathurge, though, was doing his absolute damndest to get the kid killed. (My two favourite lines - 'They won't bite!' and 'Remember, child endangerment is NOT funny!')

Absolutely random side-comment...

Am I the only one who thinks Squirrel Girl's kinda hot?

...

...

Thought so. >_>

Cliffy
04-07-2005, 01:42 PM
In the original Kirby comics, Black Racer used to chase folks down if he felt it was their time. Young Fastbak received accolades by outracing him once.

--Cliffy

Menocchio
04-07-2005, 01:49 PM
Frankly I think any avatar of death on skis begs to be compared to the Black Racer.

I mean, death, on skis?

I love Kirby, but I can't say I'm fond of his tendancy to give cosmic entities sporting equipment.

Kamino Neko
04-07-2005, 01:49 PM
Huhn.

Damned obnoxious deaths.

CandidGamera
04-07-2005, 04:04 PM
Lessee - the rest. Shanna the She-Devil - Well, if not for the cheesecake, this book wouldn't be interesting at all. Justice League Adventures #28 - Heard it had a Legion appearance on a messageboard, and so I picked it up. Yay, Legion! Ultimate FF #17 - Right on. The Ever-lovin', Blue-eyed Thing gets some primo clobberin time. And I looooove that cover. Witching #10 - I think it's over. It was okay.

Cliffy
04-07-2005, 04:39 PM
As I mentioned on another thready here recently, back in the Marvel Two-In-One days the lettercol was titled "The Ever-Lovin' Blue-Eyed Letters Page." I laughed every month.

--Cliffy

Scott Plaid
04-07-2005, 04:52 PM
Blood of the Demon : Etrigan's status quo has changed - it seems that's he free of Blood's physical body, but Jason Blood's not out yet, doing his best Martin stein impression and .. well, nagging the demon. Batman shows up.I haven't read this, but I recall reading the original origin story. Let me get this straight, Blood is trapped in the demon, and he is just nagging? Even before he realized what he was he was a student of the occult. Why not trying to see if he can magic his way out, or force Etrigan to comply. Surely he can visualize spells to make them happen.

E-Sabbath
04-07-2005, 04:58 PM
The Marvel Heroclix Thing has blue eyes. The rest of the figures have dotted pupils.

I was very happy to see that.

Power Pack: ... well. I like Power Pack. I always have. This is pretty good. Given a choice between _this_ Julie Power and the one in Runaways? Gimmie this one.

Wolfian
04-07-2005, 05:30 PM
Lex Luthor. Good stuff.

Are we supposed to recognize the gal in the tank?

I dunno. When does this take place? My question probably won't help answer yours, but I'm just curious.

Ranchoth
04-07-2005, 05:30 PM
Batman: (last week's) What's up with the Joker? It looks like someone worked him over even before the beating started. Is that from something, or just a comment on how fugitive psychopaths probably wouldn't have the best living conditions. I'm not liking the twist. I think I see where they're going with this (assuming this isn't another illusion or imposter), and it could work, but so could keeping him dead! Somebody had better check Bucky's pulse.

I haven't seen this latest issue, but a few months back... the Joker got pretty beaten up by—I think it was Hush and a new Red Hood—trying to get back into Gotham, before he limped off into safety at an abandoned amusment park.

If that's of any help. (Which it probably isn't. :smack: :( )

You know, on a side note, you'd think that in a comic book universe with a history as long and colorful as DC's, some hero or another would get the idea to start burning down all the abandoned amusment parks and other prefab lairs beforehand. Y'know, like you'd put latches on your garbage cans if you had a racoon problem.

CandidGamera
04-08-2005, 07:23 AM
I haven't read this, but I recall reading the original origin story. Let me get this straight, Blood is trapped in the demon, and he is just nagging? Even before he realized what he was he was a student of the occult. Why not trying to see if he can magic his way out, or force Etrigan to comply. Surely he can visualize spells to make them happen.

Well, it's been one issue with the new status quo, give the man some time. Sheesh. :rolleyes:

Menocchio
04-08-2005, 10:25 AM
I haven't seen this latest issue, but a few months back... the Joker got pretty beaten up by—I think it was Hush and a new Red Hood—trying to get back into Gotham, before he limped off into safety at an abandoned amusment park.

If that's of any help. (Which it probably isn't. :smack: :( )

You know, on a side note, you'd think that in a comic book universe with a history as long and colorful as DC's, some hero or another would get the idea to start burning down all the abandoned amusment parks and other prefab lairs beforehand. Y'know, like you'd put latches on your garbage cans if you had a racoon problem.

Ah. That makes sense, since it's the new Red Hood who finds him at an abandoned amusement park and beats him (I'd say to death, if this wasn't the Joker).

The current Red Hood being, apparently Jason Todd, all growed up, back from the dead and pissy as ever .

And I agree. i've always wondered why the Gotham city council didn't immediately close, rename, and/or demolish any streets, buildings, or locations with references to twos, clowns, comedy, or birds.

Wolfian
04-08-2005, 09:44 PM
I forgot: Justice League Unlimited. A nice little story starring the Question. I'm not into the series enough to become a regular buyer, but I pick up the ones featuring characters I enjoy.

Scott Plaid
04-09-2005, 10:05 PM
Wolfian, I hardly ever go to the comic book store, since it is out in Towson. However, I must go, now that I have seen your post.

D_Odds
04-11-2005, 09:10 AM
Things I read this week (I tend to do 2-4 weeks at once):
Ultimate Secret: The introduction of Captain Marvel, one of my all time favorites.
LSH #4: Just love this title. I can deal with a black Nick Fury, but that's not Star Boy to me. Poor Karate Kid, but it's Ultra Boy/Phantom Girl and Karate Kid/Princess Projectra. Don't mess *too* much with my beloved Legion.
Countdown to Infinite Crisis #0: I am not happy. Not a bad story, but I don't like the direction they thrust either of the main characters. I do like how they played up the fact that Booster Gold is from the future, and knows much that will happen (like Doomsday and the events of this book). As noted in a thread 2 or 3 weeks ago, it will make it hard to finish the current JLA: Classified arc. But I will, as Giffen/MacGuire make me laugh.
Deadshot #5: As stated earlier, a pleasant diversion.
Superman/Batman #18: Batman is reconnected with his raison d'etre (and I'm not going to go find the accented letters to get that right).

Question:
Anyone reading Action Comics? Supposedly the Captain Marvel arc is beginning. I'm a CM fan, and wonder if the story is any good.

CandidGamera
04-11-2005, 09:15 AM
Question:
Anyone reading Action Comics? Supposedly the Captain Marvel arc is beginning. I'm a CM fan, and wonder if the story is any good.

I have been picking it up.. did I miss a new one this week?

shy guy
04-11-2005, 09:22 AM
The new issue of Action that begins the Captain Marvel story comes out this week.

Cliffy
04-11-2005, 10:07 AM
GLA: Misassembled #1 -- I was informed this would be a comedy. Joke's on me. Still a good issue. I was surprised by the twist at the end, even though it should have been obvious. This Dan Slott guy's got the goods.

Y - The Last Man #32 -- Great opening to the arc. I was surprised by the main even there, but I shouldn't have been -- three years without getting laid is a long enough time to broaden your horizons (assuming they even need broadening). And the scene right before it happened was note-perfect. The character of the new captain seems interesting (as always, every arc introduces a new ally that I'd like to see stay with the group, but they never do). As to the fact that it's all the same story, well, what would you expect from a book about the most important treasure on the planet? Of course all these groups have an agenda. (And anyway, the description doesn't fit for every arc.)

Seven Soldiers: Zatanna #1 -- Mostly set-up. Not as good as the Guardian issue.

Also bought but haven't read the first Slaine volume from DC and Death Jr. which is drawn by the wonderful Ted Naifeh.

--Cliffy

E-Sabbath
04-11-2005, 10:30 AM
Hee hee. Wait till you see what Dan does next. RECRUITMENT DRIVE!

He's got the goods. He did the She-Hulk comic, and the next one coming up... but more importantly, he's doing Spider-Man vs Human Torch miniseries, and it's so accurate to time and period I could probably date each issue he's written to within about ten issues. (The first happened just a bit after 'Guy Named Joe'. for example)
The third, though, is the best, in my opinion. That's my Spidey, the one I grew up with.

WonK
04-12-2005, 11:56 PM
Hi,

I'm new here. Was invited by a friend who asked me to pass on the comic book reviews I post elsewhere, so please excuse me if I mess up on something below, like,...

Spoiler Warning[s],....

Bad Guys & Hard Cases

Picked up copies of Shaolin Cowboy #2 and Doc Frankenstein #1 this week. I think these are second or third printings, though the fine print in the indicia says these are first printings (Anyone know for sure?). Comparing the two makes for an interesting exercise. Both books are rendered in hyperdetailed style, by Geoff Darrow and Steve Skroce (no complaints there - the work is wonderful - and as ever much is owed to the colorists - When does Dave Steward sleep?). However their layouts are very different. Darrow's advance by milliseconds, the better for us to see the blow-by-blow of stylized kung fu style fighting, as well as accenting the utter absurdity of the situation: the ranting Crab, the awful paradox of the Shaolin Monks rhetoric compared to the skills that they teach, the Crab's disgusting hencemen, the comic conceits of the Donkey. But this also has the effect of stretching time out to extremes, and the whole book paradoxically feels under-developed, the handful of gags stretched over too many pages. Of course it's hard to complain: after all, I sincerely doubt that the people at Burleyman have any pretense here of serious fare. In many ways this issue of Shaolin Cowboy reminds me of Frank Miller's Tales to Offend.

In stark contrast, the panel layouts and the shifts between locales and whole eras in Doc Frankenstein #1 make for almost startling leaps in time and space. Nothing moves slowly here. The only thing holding the individual scenes together, is the Monster's narration, which touches quite effectively on themes of alienation, disillusionment, and the despised minorities pride in having achieved something. The verbiage is essential here; otherwise the book wouldn't hold together, and reading this story would have the disjointed feel of David Lynch's version of Frank Herbert's Dune (which read like a 'greatest hits" montage of moments from the source novel).

As a result of Skroce and Darrow's varied extremes of pacing, both books suffer from a curious lack of suspense. This is compounded by the fact that, from the moment the monk and the monster are introduced, it's made pretty damn clear that they are nigh invincible in their worlds. You never get the sense, conscious or otherwise that they could lose, making the noble drama of the monsters narration, and the sick humor implicit in the Monk's situation very, very necessary. Almost too necessary.

But then, there's that great art!

Christos Gages' Deadshot #5 miniseries, "Urban Renewal" came to a close this week. As before, I couldn't help noticing places where a more imaginative approach to the page layouts would have made for a much more exciting read (though this issue was definately better in that regard than the previous two issues). It underscores a maxim of the superhero (or in this case, supervillain) genre: the more straightforward and "plain" the tale, the greater the burden is on the penciller to juice it up with exciting panel compositions.

There's a lot of dark humor in this story, and I especially appreciated the jokes (I so wished were better emphasized) during the final great gun battle, and the lengths to which Floyd Lawton goes to insure his legacy lasts. Humor's a necessity when a story is this grim (I can't even begin to make a body count for this miniseries). Still I liked the story enough to be willing to check out a sequel, perhaps something set ten years down the line, when Zoe, Deadshot's daughter is of college age, his 'fiance' has married the sympathetic cop, and the mobsters fragile truce begins to breakdown.

Go Frank, (eh, ... I mean), Floyd Go!

Azzarello's Ayn-Rand-ish, Lex Luthor Man Of Steel #2, is blessed with fine art: the best I've seen yet from Berjemo, beautifully colored by Steward (again!). Whatever baggage one brings to this story, whatever memories one might have of Lex Luthor, evil businessman, US President, mad scientist and irrational bald loon; you cannot help but forget all of it. Even when Azzarello's Luthor sends third parties (Minutemen?) to do evil behind the scenes, you cannot help but admire him a little as he shepards his long range plans and projects to fruition (Is that the Supergirl who sported short black hair and died in Loeb's first Superman/Batman storyarc in that tank? Could it be T.O. Morrow's Tommorrow Woman from JLA?). This Luthor is a "real man" in the Post WWII American sense of the word. (If Joe Casey's Jack Marlowe had been half as compelling, would WildCATs v.3.0 still be on the stands?) I can't wait to see him play hardball with Bruce Wayne across a negotiating table next issue.

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

After the last two issues, marred by some confusing sequences that went by a tad too quickly, and required three readings to fully understand, I'm happy to say Justice League Elite #10 has to be one of the best Joe Kelly stories I've ever read. I don't think I've ever read anything by him that was this dense, firmly grounded in character, and intriguing. My hats off to the man. Now in it's third to last issue, the whole series finally shakes out into an interesting exploration of the balance between a manichean division between good and evil in the varied protagonists; from the disasterous breakdown of Vera Black's ability to deny the evil in her own soul, to Coldcast's gritty acceptance of killing as a way to the "greater good" (you almost want to see Black Adam offer Coldcast sanctuary in Khandaq), and the (expected) penance Manitou Raven's wife has to pay for betrayal. (As others guessed, she will have to step up and become the next super-shaman - and likely be the key to saving the world from Eve.) All this is neatly contrasted against the ineffectual quibbling among the staunchly upright members of the Justice League. Good character driven ensemble drama here. The only thing I missed, and would have like to have seen, is Kelly do something with Cassandra Cain, who served with the Elite until last issue in the guise of an assassin, Kasumi, and who very well may have been sent back to Bludhaven by Batman for the duration.

In this era of (at times) forced "decompression", "highly compressed" books like Palmiotti, Gray and Santacruz' Twilight Experiment #3 are a welcome change of pace, but unlike, say, Gail Simone's Birds of Prey or Joe Kelly's JLA Elite, books that are loaded with incident and fast character bits, Twilight Experiment #3 features a series of sudden revelations forced in rapid succession on a vacationing paramedic named Rene, who spent her whole life in a bad mix of self hatred for, and denial of superpowers she never sought, and have long tried to hide. Sudeenly she has to cope with the fact that the father who abandoned her both did so for virtuous reasons, and that in order to save her life, he gave her superpowers, which are somehow connected to the life changing accident that took her sisters life. This "pile on" of unwelcome information has the structural effect of making the reader share her anger and confusion (which is a good thing here). And with the possible end of the world hanging (literally) overhead, she isn't going to have a lot of time to adjust.

Rene's situation is very much like that Vera Black faces in the JLA Elite, discussed above. Both Vera and Rene will have to overcome years of denial to reconcile herself to the power and potential for evil inside her, if she is going to be able to do any good (much less save) the world around her. This level of psychological depth adds a welcome complexity to both titles (though there are points when one might be forgiven for dismissing Rene as a bit of a self pitying whiner. Vera, on the other hand, might not survive her adventure with her sanity intact.

There is however, one thing I do not understand: why is Michael so well adjusted? He's clearly "the other side of the equation" to the problem of the Black Adam like superbeing floating above. But as regards Rene's personal problems, is he there simply as an exemplar of self acceptance, or does he have his own discoveries to make, his own obstacles to overcome?

Loveable Losers, Beautiful Women & Sometimes Both.

After all the serious and dense stuff discussed above, it was nice to take a break with lighter fare. (Thank God for a balanced market). Dan Slott’s Great Lakes Avengers #1 was a thoroughly enjoyable respite (as ever his jokes are great!). This issue focused on the travails of their leader, Mr. Immortal, as his customary enthusiasm and boosterism fades, as he reviews his sad, ridiculous life, in and out of spandex. And while Pelliterier’s art doesn’t quite have the cartoon-y quality a Frank Cho might bring to the project, the very generic-superhero quality of his style helps ground the story firmly in the Marvel Universe, a real plus when it comes to this story of superhero envy and failure. Fun stuff.

Seven Soldiers: Zatanna #1 has to be my favorite, so far, of Grant Morrison’s Seven Soldiers miniseries, and the first that I’ll likely continue buying straight through to the end. Ryan Sooks art is beautiful here, reminding me very much of Adam Hughes work on Ghost and Gen13, in his modeling of faces and figures, panel compositions, the way he “spots blacks”, and the way he underscores the humorous elements of Morrison’s script. Lovely stuff: Sook’s Zatanna (another lovable loser) is second only to Frank Cho’s Shanna, the She Devil, as the most expressive characterization I’ve seen in some time.

You really see the “cartoonist” in Frank Cho’s page layouts in Shanna the She-Devil #3. He fills each step-by-step sequence with such marvelous, expressive faces and gestures, that you hardly notice how decompressed the story is. It’s a fine example of cartooning and panel sequencing as entertainment, the kind of which you often only see when one person (like Miller, Hernandez, Eisner or Larsen) writes and illustrates a title. And he does action scenes so well here, that by issues end I was dying to see what Cho would do with Red Sonja, Grace Choi (of the Outsiders), Big Barda (Mr. Miracle), Thundra (of the Avengers), Starfire (of the Titans) or Fairchild (of Gen13) back in the day.

A Book

I’ve only had time to give Wizard: How to Draw (for Comics), a cursory glance. It’s a compilation of the monthly “drawing for comics” feature that appears in the magazine. The sections on superhero anatomy, while good, due to space limitations of the monthly feature, you find might yourself wishing there were more examples, or a greater number of views. The same might apply to specific topics, like actual step by step working methods for applying three-point perspective to detailed backgrounds. Also, conspicuous by it’s absence, is a discussion of costume, cloth and clothing. On the other hand the book has a lot of information specific to comic book illustration that might be hard to find elsewhere. The sections on posing and gesture for action scenes, the expert discussions of how to make comic book women look sexier, and the good discussions of page layout for effect, textures and special effects conveyed via lettering. While the book is not the exhaustive reference one might hope for, it’s chock full of such tips, and as such would make a useful reference for the aspiring illustrator.

One thing bothered me a little. With the single exception of Tom Grummett, the guest artists writing and illustrating the column seem to use Marvel characters exclusively in thier exercises and examples. Is there are reason for this? Just wondering.

Any late breaking thoughts folks?

Hey, It's That Guy!
04-13-2005, 12:23 AM
WonK! It's good to see you here, man. Everyone else, this dude KNOWS comics (and movies, and tons of other stuff). He'll fit in perfectly as a Doper.

Scott Plaid
04-13-2005, 07:13 AM
A Book

I’ve only had time to give Wizard: How to Draw (for Comics),<snip>
One thing bothered me a little. With the single exception of Tom Grummett, the guest artists writing and illustrating the column seem to use Marvel characters exclusively in thier exercises and examples. Is there are reason for this? Just wondering.I am afraid that DC has their heads firmly planted in there asses, via marketing. As I recall, there was one or two DC comic characters in past editions of the articles, as well as in Toyfair's Megoville comics, but the lawyers told them to take them out in reprints. Why, because they are stupid and paranoid, plane and simple. (Either, there is a good reason, they just haven't told the public, or this is a case of DC wanting things it's way only, such as with Captain Marvel.)Here is an illustrative anctedote taken from
http://www.millarworld.net/lofiversion/index.php/t47081.html
A few years ago Gaiman was approached by a fan/sculpter with pictures of a set of Sandman related mini-sculpts, all chibi/childlike. Gaiman loved them and showed them to his editor. They said they loved them and asked for the originals so that they could show them to marketing and hopefully pay the sculptor for the work. He, stupidly, does just that. And he never hears from them again, even after a set of HIS SCULPTS are mass released with someone elses names on them. Even after numerous phone calls and promises. All ignored... by DC.
All in all, nice, compelling reviews, you Wonk. BTW, have you seen A Juggernaut Journal of Justice-Jammed Jargon (for superhero fans and aspirants) (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=303188) I would love to see an entry from you.

Menocchio
04-13-2005, 07:25 AM
I am afraid that DC has their heads firmly planted in there asses, via marketing. As I recall, there was one or two DC comic characters in past editions of the articles, as well as in Toyfair's Megoville comics, but the lawyers told them to take them out in reprints. Why, because they are stupid and paranoid, plane and simple.

More likely because DC is owned by Warner Brothers, who probably keeps the company around mainly so they can use the characters themselves. This is why DC's film track record has sucked in comparison to Marvel's. DC is at the mercy of a paticular studio, Marvel can shop around and have some say on the production.

Thank God WB seems mostly hands-off when off when it comes to the comics themselves, or else DC's output would be much, much worse.

JThunder
04-13-2005, 08:10 AM
This is why DC's film track record has sucked in comparison to Marvel's.
Only in recent years, though.

E-Sabbath
04-13-2005, 10:24 AM
Hey, WonK, welcome aboard. I'm Sabbath. My speciality is... oddness, truthfully. Last issues, other random stuff. I tend to stick to superhero comics, but my favorite current title is PS238. I worked for five years in a comic store, ending in '00, and I'm the second or third biggest Legion of Superheroes fan on this board.

The biggest is Chaim M. Keller. I can stand to be second to him. My secondary speciality is a deep love for pre-1984 DC, before it was 'cool' to do so. (As in, I was reading '60s JLAs back in the 80s.)
I also know way too much about Transformers and webcomics. (Second biggest Transfan on the board. The biggest is rjung of the annual Trannies fan awards. Again, I can stand to be second.)


Everyone else, Mouseketeer Roll Call!

Scott Plaid
04-13-2005, 10:47 AM
Again, welcome. I'm Scott Plaid. My specialty is doing some pretty good research , and arguing that my side is right, whenever I see an argument that is highly subjective. I make some pretty unique arguments that leave far right wingers on this collection of boards not giving any better answers then, "You are wrong." without them feeling the need to actually say why.

I tend to stick to manga, with some superhero comics. However, I like under-appreciated characters, and can never see why certain facts aren't canon, since I am just a casual reader. I visit comic book stores infrequently, though not for the fan-bashing reasons that I see coming from some people, though I see none of them on this thread.

P.S. Today is Guest Star Day! (http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a1_359b.html)

CandidGamera
04-13-2005, 11:18 AM
Welcome aboard.

As you can see, Scott's one of our resident comedians.

Scott Plaid
04-13-2005, 11:23 AM
::elbows CandidGamera in the side, which is not easy to do to a turtle the size of a skyscraper::

Come on, Candid, actually introduce yourself already!

Selkie
04-13-2005, 11:48 AM
WonK, I'm glad you made it! I know you know who I am, but I think the comic fan roll call's a good idea so ...

I'm Selkie, and as I was dubbed on another board, I'm a Certified Indie Elitist. In reality that title's a little overstated, but I like it and still wear it proudly. What I lack in length of time spent reading comics (five-ish years) I hopefully compensate for with breadth and intensity of reading material dating back to the early 1980's. I also bring the perspective of a supposedly rara avis, that of a woman who didn't start reading comics until nearly her third decade of life. Apparently some people think such demographics mean something. I am an unapologetic feminist who often has strong opinions regarding the use of clothing designs, anatomy, and poses in comics.

Despite my reputation, I can, do, and will enjoy the occasional superhero title, but it takes an incredible creative team, an interesting premise, and the arm-twisting of people whose opinions I respect to get me to do it. Without Big Bad Voodoo Lou's recommendations and in-depth superhero universe expertise, and WonK's reviews on other boards, I'd have given up trying long ago. Amazing what a timely intervention of Starman can do to rehabilitate one's opinion of the genre.

I, in turn, happily twist arms to bring great books like Epileptic, Persepolis, and Finder to the attention of more people, regardless of whether they normally read comics. I don't get to write about them here nearly often enough, but hopefully that situation will be changing soon. (Restoring my library to some semblence of order after the comics killed an entire bookcase must come first). With the demise of the WEF and reduced convention going I've been missing out on some of the recent small press titles, but fortunately Bosda's been recommending some good ones that remind me I need to get back into that loop.

Currently on my pull list, mostly via TPBs, are Finder, Queen & Country, Courtney Crumrin, Hellblazer and the last few issues of Sleeper. I'm also frantically seeking the last three issues of the pre-Vertigo Nathaniel Dusk, Private Investigator II miniseries from the mid-1980's which seems to have slipped off everyone's radar.

E-Sabbath
04-13-2005, 11:52 AM
Tips and tricks! Personally, I use 'painter's shelves' for my longboxes. They're heavy duty plastic shelves, you can find them at Sam's Club or Home Depot. You can store really heavy stuff on them. Like wood, or full cans of paint, or lots of paper.

Scott Plaid
04-13-2005, 11:57 AM
Do they get damaged by resting, weighed down by paint cans, against concrete blocks? :D

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