PDA

View Full Version : What is a "jugged fish" (or "jugged" anything)?


BrainGlutton
05-31-2006, 06:58 PM
I only know the phrase "jugged fish" from the Monty Python sketch about the Church Police ("There's a dead bishop on the landing!"). And a google search just turns up stuff about that sketch. Is there even such a thing as jugged fish? I did find a recipe for jugged hare: http://thefoody.com/poultry/juggedhare.html Not clear why it's called that -- no jug is used in its preparation. (Unless British vernacular usage of "jug" is broad enough to include "flame-proof casserole dish".)

pinkfreud
05-31-2006, 07:01 PM
My OED gives one definition of "jug" as "to stew or boil in a jug or jar."

Sierra Indigo
05-31-2006, 09:32 PM
Etymology and a tasty recipe:

http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipes_result.asp?name=juggedhare

Jugged hare is a classic English dish, so-called because the hare was originally cooked in a tall jug set in a deep pan of water.

MrDibble
06-01-2006, 06:20 AM
And here I always thought it was a synonymn for "potted", as in cooked, chopped/shredded, covered with fat, left to set (in the old days, in a clay crock or pot) - either coarse (confit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confit)) or fine and spreadable (rillette (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rillettes)) - I love the stuff, esp. duck confit when I've had it (twice in my short life. I've gotta move to the Perigord...).

MrDibble
06-01-2006, 06:24 AM
Heh, it turns out you can buy Potted Jugged Hare (http://www.forestfreshfoods.com/food-shop/product_info.php/manufacturers_id/23/products_id/154?osCsid=fe16f014f139aac5230794ee7513b65f) . My mouth waters at the thought.

Trunk
06-01-2006, 06:36 AM
I saw those two fat ladies make "jugged kippers" once.

Zabali_Clawbane
06-01-2006, 06:51 AM
Yep, Jugged Kippers (http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipes_result.asp?name=juggedkippers) is a popular breakfast food in some parts of the U.K.

BrainGlutton
06-03-2006, 11:15 AM
Yep, Jugged Kippers (http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipes_result.asp?name=juggedkippers) is a popular breakfast food in some parts of the U.K.

At least that recipe uses a jug.

What about "potted"? As in "potted meat." What does it mean to "pot" something?

BrainGlutton
06-03-2006, 11:28 AM
In Lindsey Davis' Marcus Didius Falco mysteries -- set in Rome during the reign of Vespasian -- a minor character, one of Falco's brothers-in-law, sells something called "potted salads." Apparently this means the vegetables or whatever are pressed into some kind of mold. I've never heard of such a thing -- did it exist in ancient Rome? Does it in modern Britain? And does the word "potted" mean the same thing here as it does in "potted meat"?

MrDibble
06-03-2006, 03:26 PM
At least that recipe uses a jug.

What about "potted"? As in "potted meat." What does it mean to "pot" something?
See my two wikipedia links above, that's basically the same thing - cooked in fat which then sets. Although you can also buy canned "potted meat" (search on it)- it's basically like spam.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.