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Zsofia
09-14-2006, 01:44 PM
Well, I've started Weight Watchers, the at home plan. And it sucks. I only get 20 points a day, man! 20 points is nothing! That's, like, dinner!

I do enjoy cooking and cook a lot, so I've been looking at these Weight Watchers cookbooks, and, I mean, they try hard to give you a big variety of food from a lot of different cuisines and things, but that's what South Beach looked like and most of those recipes were, frankly, gross, when I was trying that. Maybe I just picked the wrong ones.

Here's the thing, though - I think lowfat yogurt is gross. I think margarine is nasty. I've always been of the "let's just have less of the good stuff" school. Looking at my materials, it looks like "less of the good stuff" is my 20 points right there. What do you guys make? (And I need responses from foodies here, not people who just eat to fuel up.) I need good food, for lunch or dinner.

PS - I don't like shrimp or any molluscs, and I don't like pork that isn't bacon or barbeque. These cookbooks are full of pork and lamb and shrimp, things I just don't care for. Also, I'm not a huge fan of "big hunk of meat" - honestly, I'd be happy with vegetarian entrees or things that just use the meat as seasoning.

Also, does anybody have a good rule of thumb as to how many points you've eaten when you don't eat the whole thing? I don't eat pizza crusts, for example. I often don't eat my whole dinner. Actually, often when I make, like, Moroccan braised beef, I end up leaving most of the beef - I like the flavor it gives, I don't really need the meat and to be honest, meat can be a little gross - you never know when you're going to bite into something you're going to want to spit out.

Also, any advice on determining the points of recipes you always make? I mean, I get how to use my points calculator, but it seems a little harder with, say, my braised beef - it's stew meat, lots of other stuff, raisins, tomatoes, um, other stuff, over couscous.

PunditLisa
09-14-2006, 01:57 PM
Let me introduce you to Dotti's Weight Loss Zone (http://www.dwlz.com/). Dotti uses Weight Watchers and has a great selection of recipes and points values for all kinds of food, including fast food restaurants.

The best way I've found to keep points down is to load up on veggies. If I have a bacon, lettuce and tomato sammich, for instance, I'll load up on the lettuce and tomatoes and use reduced fat mayo and bread.

I also quite enjoy WW 1-point snacks. They have cinammon, lemon and chocolate snacks that are quity tasty for 1 point.

Good luck losing the pounds!

WhyNot
09-14-2006, 02:10 PM
I'm only just now starting Weight Watchers, but this taco soup (http://www.recipezaar.com/157732) has been one of my favorites for a while now, pre-Weight Watchers. It's 2-3 points a cup. It's really yummy, stores well (so you can make a batch and munch all week) and doesn't taste like diet food.

Jodi
09-14-2006, 02:29 PM
Also, any advice on determining the points of recipes you always make? I mean, I get how to use my points calculator, but it seems a little harder with, say, my braised beef - it's stew meat, lots of other stuff, raisins, tomatoes, um, other stuff, over couscous.

It's a bit of a PITA, but only way to really do this accurately is to add up the points of all the ingredients as you throw them in, and then divide the grand total by the number of servings to arrive at the points-per-serving. Similarly, if you leave some meat on your plate, you estimate the point value of what you left and deduct it from the total for that serving.

If you like to cook, you might want to try experimenting on your own with making your own dishes lower fat. Things that might "taste gross" on their own (like low-fat cheese, or fat-free yogurt) can be okay when they are used in sauces or incorporated into dishes. For example, you probably can figure out how to make a better meatloaf (one more to your taste) on your own than by following a WW meatloaf recipe. Switch to a leaner cut of meat, throw in more of the veggies you like, add more spices, use egg white instead of whole egg, etc.

WW is all about making choices you can live with. If you don't like dishes made with low-fat foods, you may not like a lot of WW recipes, because they are intentionally made as similar to the high-fat version as they can be, so that people don't feel deprived, like they're eating "diet" food (watercress and a plain broiled chicken breast). Eating "real" Beef Stroganoff (as opposed to the version made with skim milk and fat free sour cream) is okay, but you're going to get to eat a lot less of it, so you may find it harder to stick to your points goal without feeling hungry. But does "low fat" Beef Stroganoff taste like the real thing, as rich and delicious? Of course not. You may strongly prefer real cheese (and who doesn't?) bu the fact of the matter is that you probably cannot eat a healthy diet daily (much less a weight loss one) and each much real cheese. So the question is whether you're willing to learn to like low-fat cheese, or whether you're going to be willing to go without. I would only suggest that you consider training your palate to like at least some lower-fat selections, even if only mixed in dishes. I imagine a person who insisted on real cheese, chocolate, soda, or none, would find the program -- or any program -- very hard to do.

Good luck!

Mithril
09-14-2006, 02:32 PM
Stir fry is great, WW-wise. You can control how much meat goes in, and what you serve it over. There are plenty of no- or one-point per seving sauces out there, too.

Do you know the formula for points? It's (# of calories/50)+(grams of fat/12)-(grams of fiber/5 [ maximum grams of fiber is 4]).

MovieMogul
09-14-2006, 02:34 PM
Check out the magazine Cooking Light (http://www.cookinglight.com/cooking/). You can find it in any major grocery store, and it has tons of very good, tasty recipes that are WW friendly.

As for point calculations, whenever I set out to make a recipe, I combine all the Calories, Fat, and Fiber amounts of the ingredients together (per serving) and throw it in the calculator for a Grand Total. Then, I keep a spreadsheet of my recipes with the point amounts so that if I ever make it again, I don't have to redo all the tabulating & calculating--I've got the number right there. This also helps so if I know if I can't go above X amount of points a certain night, I know what I can and can't make easily ahead of time.

Jodi
09-14-2006, 02:37 PM
Also, as someone who likes to cook, there's a lot you can do just employing your own common sense. You can cook a chicken breast 600 ways, and if you're not putting anything on it that's bad (make a chicken-stock-and-wine sauce instead of a cream sauce), and you're not cooking it in a way that adds fat (sautee it in a non-stick pan with Pam instead of frying it), you know you're probably okay.

There are a ba-zillion low-fat chicken and fish recipes on the Internet, even if they're not WW recipes. So long as nutritional information is given, you can calculate the points yourself. Dont' fee like you're limited to WW recipes when they are not to your taste; you're not. You have to eat what you like, or you won't stick with the program.

Zsofia
09-14-2006, 03:08 PM
I just found out that my favorite Thai curry is 19 points for one lousy cup. I could cry.

However, the baked falafel sandwiches on the WW website right now (the pages anyone can see, I'm not paying just to get on their site) got a thumbs up from me and the boyfriend. Not bad at all. The sauce, on the other hand, sucked the goat ass and we had to make up our own, but that's life.

WhyNot
09-14-2006, 03:11 PM
I just found out that my favorite Thai curry is 19 points for one lousy cup. I could cry.

However, the baked falafel sandwiches on the WW website right now (the pages anyone can see, I'm not paying just to get on their site) got a thumbs up from me and the boyfriend. Not bad at all. The sauce, on the other hand, sucked the goat ass and we had to make up our own, but that's life.
Do you want to post your curry recipe and see if we can whittle it down a few points? Jodi's right, it won't taste exactly the same, but eating the same is what got you where you are!


(Just post the ingredients and a short description of the cooking method - whole recipes are often copyrighted and we're not allowed to post them verbatim.)

GingerOfTheNorth
09-14-2006, 03:17 PM
Maaaaaan, 20 points is a TON. [/WW veteran]

A couple of good sources for recipes are http://www.oduamy.com/recipes_type.html, http://members.aol.com/recipenook/weight.htm, and http://www.healthdiscovery.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=4

Good luck to you!

One of my favourites is a chicken stir-fry, where the chicken is marinated in Fat-Free Italian dressing; add a bunch of vegetables and go to town. I use a lot of shredded cabbage in it and it is really, really filling but very low point.

Zsofia
09-14-2006, 03:17 PM
Actually, AFIAK recipes aren't copyrightable - in other words, a list of ingredients and an order to cook 'em in isn't copyrightable, although other matter associated with recipes is. I'd be happy to be corrected, though.

Evidently, I got where I am now by eating musselman curry. Who knew? This is my Moroccan braised beef, though:

2.5 lbs boneless chuck, cubed (I use whatever stew meat they have)
olive oil once around the pan
2 cups chopped onions
2 garlic cloves
1 tbsp garam masala
1 tablespoon paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup dry Sherry
2 cups beef broth
1 14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
1 1/2 cups golden raisins
served over some random amount of couscous


I don't think it's that bad at all, but then all these things that I've been thinking aren't that bad are turning out to be TERRIBLE. If I can't make this stuff, my boyfriend is going to throw a revolt and probably set my points calculator on fire. It's his favorite. :)

DeadlyAccurate
09-14-2006, 05:37 PM
That's 12.5 points worth of raisins! Could you cut that amount in half? And how many servings is that recipe for? It looks like it's for 8-10 people.

WhyNot
09-14-2006, 05:58 PM
Actually, AFIAK recipes aren't copyrightable - in other words, a list of ingredients and an order to cook 'em in isn't copyrightable, although other matter associated with recipes is. I'd be happy to be corrected, though.

Evidently, I got where I am now by eating musselman curry. Who knew? This is my Moroccan braised beef, though:

2.5 lbs boneless chuck, cubed (I use whatever stew meat they have)
olive oil once around the pan
2 cups chopped onions
2 garlic cloves
1 tbsp garam masala
1 tablespoon paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup dry Sherry
2 cups beef broth
1 14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
1 1/2 cups golden raisins
served over some random amount of couscous


I don't think it's that bad at all, but then all these things that I've been thinking aren't that bad are turning out to be TERRIBLE. If I can't make this stuff, my boyfriend is going to throw a revolt and probably set my points calculator on fire. It's his favorite. :)
No, it's not bad, but there is room for trimming, if you want.

The immediate changes I'd try (and bear in mind that your first attempt will probably be a disappointment, until you learn what you can lose and what's just not negotiable) would be to replace the oil with a spray of nonfat cooking spray in a nonstick skillet (120 calories) use 1/2 cup red wine (saving roughly 85 calories) and 1/4 cup Sherry (another 75 calories), and reduce the raisins to 1 cup (saving 400+calories). Use water to replace the missing liquid. If that tastes flat, try adding a tablesppon of red wine vinegar and/or sherry vinegar. And, of course, switching to whole wheat couscous, while not a calorie buster, is a healthier food choice. Are there other veggies you could add to stretch it? Pea pods, perhaps, or red, green or yellow sliced bell peppers?

Zsofia
09-14-2006, 07:16 PM
Well, we eat on it for a few days. I don't know how many servings exactly, we just glop it out. That's the thing that's going to be a tough adjustment - thinking a lot more about portion size and exactly how much I eat. We probably get 6-8 servings out of it but should do less.

The raisins are the best part. They swell up in the liquid and get so tasty. :(

freckafree
09-14-2006, 09:29 PM
Wa-a-a-a-y back when I was a WW leader :eek: , I got suckered into one of those "for the low, low price of xxx, we'll send you a packet of tasty recipes" deals. When I finally figured out how much it was costing me to assemble this cookbook, I cancelled the subscription. But, let me tell you, the recipes are WONDERFUL! Not a dog in the bunch that I tried.

Some of my favorites:
Pork, black bean, and red pepper stew (you don't like pork, but this would work just as well with chicken or beef)
Corn, chicken and black bean chowder
Moroccan chicken stew (very similar in concept to the beef recipe you posted)

If any of these sounds good, let me know and I can e-mail you the recipes.

I second the vote for Cooking Light. Very easy to figure out the points from their recipes.

Loach
09-14-2006, 11:48 PM
20 points? You must be small already. I think I started out at 28. Easiest way to make your points stretch? Exercise. Make sure you get those extra exercise points. My favorite recipe on the WW site is the one named hearty turkey chili. 8 points per serving IIRC. It's the chili recipe we use even when there is no dieting going on.

Glory
09-15-2006, 12:07 AM
Hey Zsofia, I sent you an email with some recipes. It's coming from a hotmail account, if you need to check your spam filters.

Zsofia
09-15-2006, 08:25 AM
Yeah, I'm only at 140, but 30 pounds of that has been in one year and 10 in one MONTH, so I realized I need to stop this train before it pulls into the station and can't pull itself out again. Also, at first I gained some weight and grew out of my awesome expensive pants, and then I gained some weight and grew out of the awesome expensive pants I bought when I got this job, and then I gained some weight and grew out of the mid-range pants I bought as fat pants, and now I shop at Chico's with the ladies of a certain age and I'm starting to really like this elastic waist thing. It's getting a lot more expensive to gain weight than to lose it, as far as I can tell. The pain in the ass of it is, I'm not allowed more than 20 points (I mean, aside from activity points and flex points) but I'm not supposed to eat less than that either.

I'm concerned that this whole thing is making me think more about food, because you have to kind of obsess about it so much - how many points is that? Do I have that many points? If I eat that what can I have for dinner? What if I put it in a wrap? What if I make it with low fat mayo? What if what if what if aaargh munch munch munch munch. I think I understand where the Cookie Monster is coming from now. I assume when you get more familiar with the program that it becomes a lot more automatic.

freckafree, I'd love to have those recipes. I really wish that the WW cookbooks I've gotten had some interactive social software element - before the diet thing I relied on epicurious.com and allrecipes.com because you can see if it's really any good or not - read the reviews, make your own decision. Personally I never make anything on allrecipes unless it has at least, say, 50 reviews, and I prefer three digits. Nothing sucks like trying a new recipe not knowing if it's good, and even though it seem like a good idea on the page it's just nasty when it comes time to eat it. Those three digit recipes are reliable. I've gotten out of the cookbook habit, I guess.

Zsofia
09-15-2006, 09:01 AM
Oh, in case that seemed a little unhealthy in attitude, let me assure you that while not short, I'm very slight of frame. For years my natural weight was just very low - between my roaring metabolism and my bird bones, I kept really steady at about a hundred pounds ever since I quit growing. In high school and college I kept trying to gain ten pounds. Never could do it. Then suddenly, mid 20's... and it doesn't help that I've only gained between my waist and my knees, mostly. (Well, and a cup size or so, damn it. Bras are expensive!)

A few weeks ago a lady at work asked me when it was due. I looked down and had to agree, yeah, I can see where she arrived at that conclusion.

susan_foster
09-15-2006, 11:47 AM
freckafree, I'd love to have those recipes. I really wish that the WW cookbooks I've gotten had some interactive social software element - before the diet thing I relied on epicurious.com and allrecipes.com because you can see if it's really any good or not - read the reviews, make your own decision. Personally I never make anything on allrecipes unless it has at least, say, 50 reviews, and I prefer three digits. Nothing sucks like trying a new recipe not knowing if it's good, and even though it seem like a good idea on the page it's just nasty when it comes time to eat it. Those three digit recipes are reliable. I've gotten out of the cookbook habit, I guess.

If you're looking for reviews, check out the Cooking Light BB - http://community.cookinglight.com . They do review CL recipes, as well as non-CL (but you can avoid those).

For WW cookbooks, I would check out Take Out Tonight & Versatile Vegetarian. Lots of good reviews for the first, and my favorite Mac&Cheese recipe comes from the second.

Susan

romansperson
09-15-2006, 01:16 PM
use 1/2 cup red wine (saving roughly 85 calories) and 1/4 cup Sherry (another 75 calories)

This brings up a question I've been pondering. I've been trying to figure out points for a bunch of recipes I've got, and I've always been told that when you cook with alcohol, the alcohol cooks off. Since the calories in wine, sherry, etc. come from the alcohol, how many points are you supposed to count for those things? It's just something that never came up when I was doing the online WW program, and so I never asked anyone.

Loach
09-15-2006, 02:43 PM
This brings up a question I've been pondering. I've been trying to figure out points for a bunch of recipes I've got, and I've always been told that when you cook with alcohol, the alcohol cooks off. Since the calories in wine, sherry, etc. come from the alcohol, how many points are you supposed to count for those things? It's just something that never came up when I was doing the online WW program, and so I never asked anyone.

I don't know the answer to that but Alton Brown says the alcohol never completely cooks off. He is very clear about that since some can not ingest alcohol. I believe everything he says.

romansperson
09-15-2006, 02:51 PM
Well, I just did some Googling around and found a little info on Hormel's site (of all places), which they credit to the USDA. Scroll to the end:

http://www.hormel.com/templates/knowledge/knowledge.asp?catitemid=57&id=579

So I guess how many points you count depends on how long you cook your item.

Voyager
09-15-2006, 03:17 PM
My wife is on WW, and we've been eating WW recipes almost exclusively for over a year. We have a ton of cookbooks, and she gets the recipes from their web site - but warning, some seem to have bugs in them - treat them as beta recipes.

When I get home I'll post some of the ones we like the best. After each week, we write down the ones that work for us.

Her biggest complaint is that they take a lot of prep time. She works at home, so its not a problem, but if both of you come home at 7, it could be a pain. You've got to like peppers and veggies to make these work, but since we both do, no problem.

We've found the percentage of recipes that work in WW cookbooks is higher than in most cookbooks. They're pretty good.

WhyNot
09-15-2006, 03:27 PM
I don't know the answer to that but Alton Brown says the alcohol never completely cooks off. He is very clear about that since some can not ingest alcohol. I believe everything he says.
I do too, but it's still a little misleading. After simmering for an hour, there's only 25% of the alcohol left. So, if you started with a table wine (you wouldn't cook with anything you wouldn't drink, riiiight? :dubious: ), you started with less than 14% alcohol. So in half a cup, you'd have roughly 1/2 ounce of actual alcohol. After simmering an hour, you'd have 4 milliliters of alcohol in your whole pot of food. If you're eating a cup or two of the final food, that's a minute, minute amount of alcohol - if it's an 8 quart soup, you've got 0.05% alcohol, or 0.1 proof.

Yes, if you're cooking for someone who medically or religiously may absolutely have not any alcohol, it's a concern. These people should also not be eating bananas or oranges or drinking fruits juices or eating leftover grains, due to the natural fermentation of their sugars. A glass of orange juice is actually 1 proof (0.5% alcohol) - ten times that of our hypothetical soup.

If you're cooking for an addict who might be set off by the taste or smell of the wine, that's another concern.

But while technically you can't boil off ALL of the alcohol, you can get enough out to satisfy all but the most rabid MADDer.


But as for the calorie question, I don't know. Wines are more than water and alcohol, so my guess is that some calories remain, but I don't know how much or how to calculate that.

When you put the number in the points generator, though, it's figuring it out from the raw materials, not the after-cooking.

want2know
09-15-2006, 03:35 PM
I assume when you get more familiar with the program that it becomes a lot more automatic.


And that's pretty much the key to the whole program. Once you get used to eating a certain way on WW, it gets easier as time goes by.

One of the major advantages to WW is that it teaches you not to deprive yourself. The key is portion control. Yeah, I know, measuring stuff can get to be a real PITA, but after a while, you just get a feel for how much is enough.

Mrs. Know has been on WW for three months now and has lost 30 lbs (on 28 points). When I cook, I usually don't use WW recipes, and yet she's managed to still lose the weight by managing her portions. And you'd be surprised at how simple it is. For instance, last week I made a rice side dish. She told me to give her 1 cup of it. I got the measure, filled it, and plated it. Imagine my surprise at just how much 1 cup is! I've put on a few pounds over the past year, so now I'm considering doing WW myself--and I love to eat!

Also, you make no mention of vegetables. A lot of vegetables have no points at all, and are very filling.

BTW, Mrs. Know also exercises 2-3 times a week. This also gives you flexibility in what you can eat.

And she says that if you're still having problems with the program, you might want to consider going to the meetings for a little extra support.

Good luck, Zsofia . We're rooting for you!

Waenara
09-15-2006, 03:46 PM
But as for the calorie question, I don't know. Wines are more than water and alcohol, so my guess is that some calories remain, but I don't know how much or how to calculate that.Pure alcohol has 7kcal per gram. Whereas carbohydrates and protein are 4kcal per gram and fat is 9kal per gram.

For example, according www.fitday.com, 8oz of white wine has 160 calories (0g of fat, 1.89g of carbohydrate, 0.24g of protein and 21.95g of alcohol). So virtually all of the calories are from the alcohol itself. But if you simmer for one hour and only 25% of the alcohol remains, then you're down to 38kcal of alcohol, instead of 154kcal. If the 8oz of wine is spread over four servings, that's less than 10kcal of alcohol per person that's in the final dish.

Zsofia
09-15-2006, 04:31 PM
Also, you make no mention of vegetables. A lot of vegetables have no points at all, and are very filling.


I'm a big fan of vegetables. I'm such a big fan that I love to dip them in all sorts of things! :) I'm trying to find lower fat ways to do the vegetables I like - there's plenty of ideas for, like, broccoli and cauliflower, but those are veggies that I only like with serious fat on top of them. I like red bell peppers as a snack, but I'm going to have to explore a lot of ideas on how to do other stuff without the goat cheese and the butter and stuff. I mean, I do a fantastic roasted green bean thing with sundried tomatoes and goat cheese - I could do less olive oil on it, but I'm sure the cheese isn't so great for you. I do a real Southern butter bean and spicy sausage thing that I might have to try with less fatty sausage, but that's going to take some experimenting. I think my rosemary potatoes are okay as they are if I did less olive oil, but artichokes without hollandaise aren't really worth it. I enjoy salads with homemade balsalmic dressing, but I'm probably overdressing them.

want2know
09-15-2006, 06:38 PM
I'm a big fan of vegetables. I'm such a big fan that I love to dip them in all sorts of things! :) I'm trying to find lower fat ways to do the vegetables I like - there's plenty of ideas for, like, broccoli and cauliflower, but those are veggies that I only like with serious fat on top of them. I like red bell peppers as a snack, but I'm going to have to explore a lot of ideas on how to do other stuff without the goat cheese and the butter and stuff. I mean, I do a fantastic roasted green bean thing with sundried tomatoes and goat cheese - I could do less olive oil on it, but I'm sure the cheese isn't so great for you. I do a real Southern butter bean and spicy sausage thing that I might have to try with less fatty sausage, but that's going to take some experimenting. I think my rosemary potatoes are okay as they are if I did less olive oil, but artichokes without hollandaise aren't really worth it. I enjoy salads with homemade balsalmic dressing, but I'm probably overdressing them.

You like to dip vegetables? Try this:

[url]http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_32686,00.html[url]

And before you say "Yuk!", ponder this: I don't like yogurt or cucumbers! This stuff is mucho delicioso! Also good on pita sandwiches made with grilled chicken.

Speaking of grilled chicken, try marinating boneless chicken breast in Dijon mustard and balsamic vinegar. Very low in fat but very high in MMMMMMM!

Your butter bean and sausage thing sounds great. Try it with turkey sausage (available in your local Megamart--Turkey Store brand is terrific!).

Check out the Food Network website. I'm pretty sure they still have shows that show you how to slim down high-fat recipes--and all their recipes work like a charm for us!

Bon Appetit!

want2know
09-15-2006, 06:39 PM
Stupid coding!

Here's the link:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_32686,00.html

GingerOfTheNorth
09-15-2006, 08:30 PM
Zsofia, don't forget that you have an extra 35 points per week to do with whatever you wish. You can eat 25 per day, or you can binge on Friday night (remembering that if you weigh daily, it'll be high for Saturday and possibly Sunday as well). A friend and her husband go out for dinner every Friday night and use ALL of their flex points at that time.

I usually don't use my Flex points, relying on my activity points if I want more. I'm allowed 24 in a day (I'm 187 down from 260) and I never go hungry.

As mentioned above by want2know, it really does become second nature after awhile. I can figure out points based on the info given me without my slider, and I'm very rarely wrong (although it happens). I've also got the portion sizes down pat and very rarely measure anything anymore.

It really, really works. Even without the meetings - after a month I quit going to them because I started wanting to punch the whiners.

Zsofia
09-16-2006, 11:22 AM
I feel a little bit better - yesterday since I had mostly the 0 point soup for lunch I ordered our usual pizza - I only ate two pieces instead of four, and I only had one glass of Coke, but I still only had to use two flex points and felt quite satisfied. (In fact, because I didn't eat my whole half of the pizza my tummy didn't hurt later.) I actually picked up piece 3 before I remembered and put it down, though. :)

I hate to burn my flex points carelessly, because I never know when my parents are going to call me up and say, "Let's go out to dinner!" And if we're going to Mo Mo's or Al's Upstairs I'll be damned if I can't have what I want, within reason.

Renee
09-16-2006, 12:15 PM
Here is one of my favorite diet recipes (modified from one off allrecipes.com):

1 small head red cabbage, chopped into small peices
1 can tidbit pinapple, drained (or about a cup of chopped fresh)
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup almond slivers or crushed walnuts

1/2 cup rice wine vinegar
mixed with
1/4 cup splenda
and poured over everything else.

It's really good, kind of sweet. I don't have a clue about how many points, but it can't be much. It makes a lot.

Another staple of mine is Laughing Cow light spreadable cheese wedges, both the swiss and the herb cheese. These only have 35 calories per wedge. For an awesome sandwich that only has about 200 calories, get two slices of light bread (40 cal/slice), your favorite turkey or chicken lunch meat, and a tomato (sliced and sprinkled with balsalmic vinegar) and spinach if you have it. Spread the cheese on both slices of bread, spray a nonstick pan with olive oil pam, assemble sandwich and grill until hot and crispy. This is really, really good, I promise.

Weight watchers is too complicated for me, personally. I just count calories, try to eat at least 3 servings of fruit and vegies daily, and exercise.

don't ask
09-16-2006, 12:34 PM
Here (http://www.candyboots.com/wwcards.html) are some Weight Watchers recipes from the 1970s that most WWs love. Check out the subtle photography.

Zsofia
09-17-2006, 01:23 PM
Those 70's cards are... um... great. :) I know back in the day you had to make your own damned ketchup in WW; if it hadn't come a long way I promise you I wouldn't be on it.

Something that's been bothering me is all that constructed diet food - doesn't it bother anybody else that instead of nice natural butter you're eating low fat processed plastic margarine? That to eat something like you're used to eating you have to get away from the natural foods you were trying to eat? How do you all deal with that? (I mean, I know you can do a lot by just avoiding naturally fatty foods, but it seems if you want to eat anything with dairy in it, for example, you're stuck with a bunch of frankenfoods.)

Glory
09-17-2006, 01:42 PM
Something that's been bothering me is all that constructed diet food - doesn't it bother anybody else that instead of nice natural butter you're eating low fat processed plastic margarine? That to eat something like you're used to eating you have to get away from the natural foods you were trying to eat? How do you all deal with that? (I mean, I know you can do a lot by just avoiding naturally fatty foods, but it seems if you want to eat anything with dairy in it, for example, you're stuck with a bunch of frankenfoods.)

Yes. In previous weight loss attempts I always ate the diet "frankenfoods" fat free this, sugar free that. Those foods never satisfied me, I was always restless, hungry, bingy and unhappy. I switched to a whole foods lifestyle two years ago, lost 70 lbs and have never felt better or been happier about what I eat. Except for some convenience foods that just make my lifestyle easier (bread, tortillas, veggie burger-type products), I try to eat as many whole foods as possible.

As far as butter goes, I just don't use it. I never liked it and don't bake, so it's a non issue in my life (I haven't had any in the house for 2 years). I cook with olive oil, usually. If I were going to use butter, I would DEFINITELY use butter and not margarine.

GingerOfTheNorth
09-17-2006, 02:16 PM
It doesn't really bother me, as when I moved here I noticed a difference in the flavour of the butter. Same with the beef. At home (Alberta), our cows are fed differently, and the butter is sweeter. I can do without.

I can't believe it's not butter has a low-fat that doesn't suck. I have sorta just stopped using any sort of spreads.

Jodi
09-17-2006, 05:23 PM
Something that's been bothering me is all that constructed diet food - doesn't it bother anybody else that instead of nice natural butter you're eating low fat processed plastic margarine?

Sure, but there's no happy answer here. "Real" dairy is high-fat and not good for you except in very small amounts. The answer for those for whom it's real food or nothing is "nothing":

As far as butter goes, I just don't use it.

[QUOTE=Ginger]I can do without. . . .I have sorta just stopped using any sort of spreads.[QUOTE]

I'm with Gingy. "Low fat butter" is IMO like "sugar free candy" -- it defeats the whole purpose of the food in the first place, and why bother? But the beauty of WW is that if you have to have butter you can; you just have to write it down and accommodate the points in other ways. I thought I needed to butter every bread product I ate, but once I was on the program a while and realized just how those essentially empty calories were adding up, I pretty much cut butter out of my diet. I don't really miss it now.

GingerOfTheNorth
09-17-2006, 06:24 PM
The problem with using fat-free and low-fat spreads while cooking is that they are often made with gelatin. As such, they just don't melt right. If I'm going to saute something, I'll do it using canola oil (usually spray). Sometimes, olive oil.

On a sandwich, I'll use a La Vache Qui Rit (the cow who laughs) light cheese wedge. They have a nice herby/garlic flavour, and one wedge is one point. That takes care of dry bread and adds a ton of flavour; it also negates the need for a two-point slice of cheese on my sandwich. I like 'em in a whole wheat wrap or pita with sliced cucumber and sprouts (making my very filling lunch clock in at a whoppin' 3 points).

GingerOfTheNorth
09-17-2006, 06:26 PM
La Vache Qui Rit (the cow who laughs)
DUH. Laughing Cow, as Renee posted. :smack:

Sorry, dirty foreigner that I am.

susan_foster
09-17-2006, 08:57 PM
I'm with Gingy. "Low fat butter" is IMO like "sugar free candy" -- it defeats the whole purpose of the food in the first place, and why bother? But the beauty of WW is that if you have to have butter you can; you just have to write it down and accommodate the points in other ways. I thought I needed to butter every bread product I ate, but once I was on the program a while and realized just how those essentially empty calories were adding up, I pretty much cut butter out of my diet. I don't really miss it now.

Count me in as a third. I lost my weight on WW, and I have kept it off for 4 1/2 years. Right now I am trying to take off vacation weight, and am counting points strictly again. I'm on 20 points plus the 35 weekly, and I've been able to keep to those points without eating any food that has been conciously made "low-fat". I do eat low-fat foods, like yogurt & milk, but I am very concious that the foods are not "fraken-foods". Whole grains, veggies, fruit - they should be the center.

Susan

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