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View Full Version : Studio 60 premiers tonight!!!!


ivylass
09-18-2006, 07:30 AM
I have been a Sorkin fan since Sports Night, I love A Few Good Men (okay, the ending was kind of hokey, but still) and I regretfully stopped watching West Wing after he stopped writing the script.

Tonight...the premier of the new Aaron Sorkin show! Bradley Whitford, Matthew Perry, and Judd Hirsch having a meltdown live on air!

I am so excited. Who's with me?

Turek
09-18-2006, 07:34 AM
I am so excited. Who's with me?

I'm giggling in anticipation as I write this.

h.sapiens
09-18-2006, 08:13 AM
I'm excited, but I've already seen the pilot, since NBC made it available on DVD, and I got it from Netflix a few weeks ago.

I liked it enough that I plan on watching again tonight.

Avarie537
09-18-2006, 08:39 AM
Hubby and I are big Aaron Sorkin fans as well. We're very excited to see this new show!

Dinsdale
09-18-2006, 08:47 AM
Plan on watching as well, but I'm almost a little nervous - this show is getting SO MUCH hype, I'm wary whether it can actually live up to it.
Also, I'm not a huge Friends/Chandler Bing fan - but I suspect I can let that pass.

Misnomer
09-18-2006, 08:51 AM
I liked it enough that I plan on watching again tonight.I, too, saw the pilot on DVD via Netflix, and liked it enough that I plan on taping it tonight (my class ends at 10pm). :)

WordMan
09-18-2006, 09:11 AM
Trying to manage my anticipation but my DVR is at the ready.

mmmmmm, Amanda Peet

borschevsky
09-18-2006, 09:34 AM
For some reason it was on last night at 10 on CTV here. I thought it was very good, with a few of the recognizable bits of Sorkin's writing style. I'm definitely going to be watching the series if its quality stays at this level.

ivylass
09-18-2006, 10:12 AM
Also, I'm not a huge Friends/Chandler Bing fan - but I suspect I can let that pass.

Perry won me over as an actor who could get past Chandler Bing when he played the attorney on WW who brought down Vice President Otter.

I mean, talk about a big first day at work!!

ivylass
09-18-2006, 05:25 PM
For some reason it was on last night at 10 on CTV here. I thought it was very good, with a few of the recognizable bits of Sorkin's writing style. I'm definitely going to be watching the series if its quality stays at this level.

Any pedeconferencing? ;)

cbawlmer
09-18-2006, 05:42 PM
I have my TiVo Season Pass set up and ready. I hope the show will be good, but I can't help wondering if I'll feel a little deflated by the lack of inherent gravitas of a late night sketch comedy show compared to that of the inner workings of the White House. It's lame of me to try and compare the two shows, but I can't help it; all the promos seem to emphasize a very West Wing-y vibe.

brianjedi
09-18-2006, 09:11 PM
The West Wing title font is alive and well.

And they still don't have theme music yet, because that music under the title card was the temp music they used in the screener copy.

I've seen this episode 3 or 4 times already, and I'm still captivated.

The Scrivener
09-18-2006, 09:30 PM
Hmm.. so far, it's one jumping-the-Andy-Kaufman shark and some slightly shaky line-readings by Amanda Peet. Whose character really should've reminded the network suit that she's been brought on board to save a marquee show which he (as much as anyone) has allowed to go down the tubes.

OTOH, how much you guys care to bet that the show-within-a-show will prove more entertaining than the real-life SNL of today? :(

brianjedi
09-18-2006, 09:34 PM
OTOH, how much you guys care to bet that the show-within-a-show will prove more entertaining than the real-life SNL of today? :(

I'd be thrilled if Lorne Michaels pulled a stunt like that.

Then again, Lorne Michaels is the reason SNL's that bad in the first place, so...

Otto
09-18-2006, 10:04 PM
I spent the first ten minutes wondering how they thought they could get away with so blatantly ripping off "Network" and the eleventh minute going "oh."

One the one hand, decent show so far. On the other hand, network shows that spend their time ripping on how horrible network television is always ring a little false to me because, hey, you're on the network. So we'll see.

Hey, It's That Guy!
09-18-2006, 10:05 PM
Awesome series premiere. Very glad I watched.

Hey, is the Harriet Hayes character (the Christian blonde actress) inspired by Kristin Chenoweth? I know Kristin was on The West Wing, but I wonder if she had a relationship with Sorkin at any point, or if there was any bad blood between them.

annieclaus
09-18-2006, 10:07 PM
I have to say I NEVER watched The West Wing because I have no interest in politics. But I worked in television for nearly 30 years, so I was really interested to see STUDIO 60. I loved it! I am hooked. Great cast. Good writing. I'll be back.

brianjedi
09-18-2006, 10:07 PM
Awesome series premiere. Very glad I watched.

Hey, is the Harriet Hayes character (the Christian blonde actress) inspired by Kristin Chenoweth? I know Kristin was on The West Wing, but I wonder if she had a relationship with Sorkin at any point, or if there was any bad blood between them.

They dated until she released a Christian album and went on "The 700 Club" to perform.

I kid you not.

friedo
09-18-2006, 10:16 PM
Thommy Schlamme has a really unhealthy obsession with the star filter.

We need to stage an intervention or something.

AuntiePam
09-18-2006, 10:19 PM
I liked it. I've never heard of Kristen Chenowith. Will there be Cliff's Notes, so I can keep up with the insider stuff?

I never watched Friends so don't have a problem with Matthew Perry (thought he was good here), and it's great seeing Sarah Paulson again. Loved her in American Gothic and Deadwood.

Skald the Rhymer
09-18-2006, 10:24 PM
Perry won me over as an actor who could get past Chandler Bing when he played the attorney on WW who brought down Vice President Otter.

I mean, talk about a big first day at work!!

[nitpicky jerk]

it wasn't quite his first day; he'd been there a week, at least. But yeah,he got thrown in the deep end pretty quick.

Skammer
09-18-2006, 10:27 PM
I thought it was really good. I didn't watch WW very long (too often the politics made me mad) but Sports Night was one of my favorite shows.

The only thing I thought was weak was "Crazy Christians." That's kind of a lame title for a sketch, isn't it? I wish they had shown some of the sketch, instead of just telling us how good/funny/controversial it was. Show us good and controversial.

El_Kabong
09-18-2006, 10:39 PM
I'm a real sucker for insider stuff, and I liked Sports Night a whole lot. Never saw an episode of The West Wing, however (didn't try to avoid it, just never got round to seeing it).

Pretty damn derivative plot device to get things in motion, but there were plenty of snappy lines and I thought Matthew Perry and whoever his partner was were absolutely great. In fact, I'd almost call Perry a revelation; never thought he really had that much depth. Amanda Peet, well, she's not bad, but I don't know that I buy her in that particular job position. Yeah, I know it's dramatic television, and everyone therefore has to be really pretty and have glamorous outfits. Clever how they started off with her attending a dinner party so she could do the entire ep in a really nice dress.

Kinda sweet that they got Felicity Huffman into the show. I also noticed they had Overweight Nerd from the Cap One commercials in a small part. He's clearly building up to a promising career as go-to guy when one needs the archetypal jagoff.

It'll be interesting, I think, to see what sort of Christian the character of Perry's ex turns out to be, and where the plot points that end up based on that go.

One question: was this the pilot I was watching tonight, or at least part of it?

Dinsdale
09-19-2006, 10:17 AM
My main reaction after watching was self inquiry as to my ability to give this show a fair shake. Instead of judging the show and its elements on their own merits, I was making constant comparisons. Moreover, with the bar already set so high, I felt a tendency to seek nits to pick. I will, however, keep watching (at least for a while) as I trust it will be about the highest quality (acted, written) on network TV. And my wife was really smitten.

A couple of my "concerns":
- it will take a while for me to slow down on the comparisons to WW. Tough, right now, to view Josh and Danny as different characters. Also, one thing I liked about WW was their intelligent dealing with important issues. Not sure if a network comedy scenario will allow them to address the same issues. Hope so, because I'm far less interested in entertainment industry politics.
- Amanda Peet seemed to almost always be smirking. Exactly what was that constant little smile supposed to convey? She sure is easy on the eyes, tho.
- Chandler Bing will need to do a bit more to convince me he has any serious acting chops. But I'll try to give him a fair shake.
- The studio heavy - the guy from Wings? I had a hard time accepting his character, since so far I only know him from that role. For the 1st 1/4 I was wondering "Who is that guy." Then for the rest I was thinking, "Not right in that role."
- When they trotted out Ed Asner - not to mention Judd Hirsch, I wondered if they would rely too heavily on a revolving cast of TV warhorses.
- many of the scenes - especially in the studio and the bar - had background noise that interfered with my understanding the rapidfire dialogue.

Like I said, I don't think I was able to give it an entirely fair shake last night. I fully expect things will improve when I get more of a feeling for individuals in this large case. And I think just about every good show changes/improves following the pilot. I expect this to be one of the very few new shows I will watch at all.

What do you think of the time slot? I can't remember watching many other shows Mondays at 9 p.m. Is that traditionally a "money" slot? I hope they don't move it around. No complaints from me, tho, as it fits well into my schedule.

Otto
09-19-2006, 10:21 AM
The only thing I thought was weak was "Crazy Christians." That's kind of a lame title for a sketch, isn't it?
No worse than, say, "Church Chat" or "Coneheads." The name doesn't matter.

I wish they had shown some of the sketch, instead of just telling us how good/funny/controversial it was. Show us good and controversial.
Nah, the sketch is just a Maguffin. The content of the sketch makes no difference. If they presented the sketch then people would focus on how good or bad the sketch was rather than just taking it as part of the plot. Besides, if they broadcast the sketch it would put the lie to the premise that the sketch couldn't be broadcast.

Kiros
09-19-2006, 10:24 AM
...I thought Matthew Perry and whoever his partner was were absolutely great...

The "partner" is Bradley Whitford, who won an Emmy and was nominated for two more for his work on the West Wing. He's very good, but as much as Perry's challenge here will be to get people to think of him as someone other than Chandler, Whitford's challenge will be to get identified as someone other than Josh Lyman.

One question: was this the pilot I was watching tonight, or at least part of it?

Yes, that was the pilot.

-------------------------------

The show itself? I like it, it has potential, ask me again in a season or two. 'Cause I'll be watching, especially with it being my first Sorkin-HD action.

Sean Factotum
09-19-2006, 10:36 AM
El Kabong, the show on NBC last night was the pilot. It just moved pretty fast, as the shows Sorkin writes tend to do. And if you liked Sports Night I think you'd really like TWW, at least the first four seasons.

I liked the chemistry that was extablished between Brad Whitford and Matthew Perry in the aforementioned episode of The West Wing, and I'm glad to see that they are working together here as partners. I think it will work.

I enjoyed it, the show. I purposely held off watching the pre-release just so I would see it fresh last night. And I'm glad to see that there was some pedeconferencing, but not nearly as much as their (Schlamme/Sorkin) previous shows. And the Harriet character, though at first looked to be something of a caricature, seems to have a lot more depth.

And I've got two favorite lines: The one where, after Matt's rant about how it would be impossible to embarass NBS, Jordan deadpans, "I have a mutual masturbation show already in development." The second was, at the eleventh minute (as pointed out by Otto, Jordan (again) says something like, "They've heard of Paddy Chayevsky. I'd say that's something."

All in all, I thought it was a good, solid start with plenty of room to grow.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 10:37 AM
Wow. That was just...wow.

Okay, I've never heard of completion insurance. Someone want to fill me in? I'm also a bit confused on the titles and roles. Jordan (Amanda Peet) is the new president, but president of what? Not the network, because Jack (Steven Weber) is her boss. I got that Ed Asner is the president of the company that owns the network (a la GE owning NBC.)

It was nice seeing some minor WW actors...anyone catch Katie the reporter as Danny's date? Timothy Busfield looks better with a beard. Grow that puppy back.

How big is SNL, anyway? Studio 60 looked like it employed hundreds of people.

Are we taking bets on how many episodes air before Josh Malina shows up? :p

Eve
09-19-2006, 10:43 AM
I liked it, but Amanda Peet is way too young and dewy for that role. It should be played by Donna Murphy--it's depressing to see one of the best actresses of her generation reduced to a bit part.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 10:45 AM
I was wondering that too...isn't she a bit young to be the president of a network?

Otto
09-19-2006, 10:46 AM
Okay, I've never heard of completion insurance. Someone want to fill me in?
COmpletion insurance is an insurance policy taken out by a production company to recoup the costs of production should the project be uncompleteable. Say for example half the cast is killed in a plane crash halfway into the filming schedule. The insurance company is going to insist that the cast and important crew are in good health. In this case, "good health" means that the director, with a history of drug addiction, not test positive for drugs.

I'm also a bit confused on the titles and roles. Jordan (Amanda Peet) is the new president, but president of what? Not the network, because Jack (Steven Weber) is her boss. I got that Ed Asner is the president of the company that owns the network (a la GE owning NBC.)
I think Peet is the network president and that Weber is the person in the ownership company responsible for the network. So Weber works for Asner and Peet works for Weber.

Exapno Mapcase
09-19-2006, 10:46 AM
I was worried because there was so much hype that a backlash had already started from people who were saying that the pilot wasn't all that good.

It wasn't great, but pilots have to introduce everybody and set up the relationships, which is way too much to do cleanly in only 45 minutes of script for this many talking roles. Taking that into account, Sorkin did a fine job. Lots of people were introduced, and he left himself openings to slowly introduce the cast by leaving most of them out of this episode and using one-time characters to carry the narrative load. Good thinking for television.

Amanda Peet was the low point. I'd read that she was supposed to be the big breakout character for the show, but I thought she was way too wide-eyed and naive for the position, and she only used one facial expression in every scene. She was blown off the screen by everybody in sight.

And I have to say that it's incredibly funny that people online make references to Vice President Otter as if everybody knows what that might mean when in reality half the people in this thread have never even seen West Wing and so those references go past them, let alone references to some 30-year-old movie. My suggestion: quit the cutesy I-know-them-from-another-role-and-will-refer-to-them-forever-by-that-name insider jokes. Pop culture has gotten way too fragmented for that to work anymore. People do it in every discussion thread of every tv show. It's old and overdone. Please stop it.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 10:49 AM
And I have to say that it's incredibly funny that people online make references to Vice President Otter as if everybody knows what that might mean when in reality half the people in this thread have never even seen West Wing and so those references go past them, let alone references to some 30-year-old movie. My suggestion: quit the cutesy I-know-them-from-another-role-and-will-refer-to-them-forever-by-that-name insider jokes. Pop culture has gotten way too fragmented for that to work anymore. People do it in every discussion thread of every tv show. It's old and overdone. Please stop it.

Excuse me, but I called him VP Otter because I blanked out on his character's name. I wasn't being cutesy, and I knew people who were fans of WW would know what I was talking about, and if you weren't, it wasn't that big a deal.

Otto
09-19-2006, 10:57 AM
I was wondering that too...isn't she a bit young to be the president of a network?
Well for example Brandon Tartikoff was 30 when he became president of NBC, so a young network president isn't unheard of. He was the youngest president ever.

AuntiePam
09-19-2006, 11:03 AM
What is "pedeconferencing"? Is it talking while walking? Is that a West Wing reference? I never watched West Wing, and I'm starting to think that's a good thing, since I won't have any trouble believing these characters in their new roles. (I'll be waiting for the Capital One guy to break something though.)

I do remember Tim Busfield from thirtysomething, and he hasn't aged much in what, 20 years? Maybe it's the makeup. He looked great.

h.sapiens
09-19-2006, 11:04 AM
As a point of reference, Sherry Lansing was about 36 when she became president of 20th Century Fox (movie studio). Amanda Peet is currently 34, although she looks younger.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 11:04 AM
True, but I think he's the exception rather than the rule. I could see her assistant (?), the actress who played Picard's love interest in Star Trek: Generations, as more of a president that Amanda Peet.

Little Nemo
09-19-2006, 11:05 AM
...ahem, as I attempted to say last night...

I watched the pilot a week ago (I won't say where indeference to board sensibilities) and I watched it again last night in its official broadcast. Overall, I'd rate it "acceptable".

It had its flaws:
- It's in danger of taking its subject to seriously. This isn't about the American government; this is a show about a TV show. Lighten up - more Sports Night, less West Wing.
- It's also in danger of being too autobiographical. It had better not turn into Aaron Sorkin's fictionalized version of Aaron Sorkin's life.
- Almost all of the characters were one dimensional. But that might be unavoidable in a pilot; hopefully, they'll flesh out the cast as the series progresses.
- Amanda Peet's a talented actress but you wouldn't know it from this show. She was either badly miscast or badly mis-directed.
- The biggest surprise for me was the poor writing. There were several points where I was thinking of better lines for the characters than the ones they were actually saying. Which is bad because I'm not a particularly good script writer and also because it indicates I wasn't being pulled into the story.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 11:06 AM
What is "pedeconferencing"? Is it talking while walking? Is that a West Wing reference?

That's walking while having a conversation. I think it's a Sorkin trademark, and it's quite tricky to do, but it looks cool. He also did it in Sports Night, so it's not a WW reference.

I do remember Tim Busfield from thirtysomething, and he hasn't aged much in what, 20 years? Maybe it's the makeup. He looked great.

Trivia...Josh Malina and Timy Busfield are brothers-in-law.

WhyNot
09-19-2006, 11:08 AM
I just finally watched all of Sports Night, thanks to Netflix, and never saw an episode of West Wing, so I'm a relative newcomer to Sorkin.

Overall, I liked it, but not unreservedly. It had all the earmarks of a Pilot, with the attendant clunkiness and OverExpositoriness, but I'm determined to give it a fair shot.

I didn't like Jordan at all. I'm sorry, and I know this says volumes about me, but I just can't buy that such beautiful young woman would be taken seriously enough by her superiors to rise to that job quite yet. I feel like anyone who is that bloody good looking and in television is going to be in front of the camera, not in an office. Furthermore, she lacked the Sorkin "depth" and flaws - she was too plastic, too perfect and too precise. Where is her glitch? Why wasn't she freaking out, at least a little bit in private, on her Very Bad First Day? Dana (Sports Night) was beautiful, but not too much so, but most importantly, she was flawed, as are all his characters, eventually. I hope he doesn't wait to long to show us that Jordan is human.

Cervaise
09-19-2006, 11:10 AM
I thought she was way too wide-eyed and naive for the positionLast night was my second time watching the pilot, after having seen it through Netflix. My take is that this is her character's main technique for manipulating other people, especially men; it causes those around her to misperceive what she's doing and underestimate what she's capable of. Note the Steven Weber character saying "I'm not like the others, I don't find you charming." Her actions were far from naive; the moment where she pulls her boss out of the crisis meeting with a borderline command, "Let's talk in my office," is not the act of a naive person.

Obviously, whether or not this interpretation is correct, or if the character legitimately doesn't work, will be seen over the coming weeks.

And next week's preview looked hilarious.


For the record, I never watched either West Wing or Friends, so I'm coming to the show without any actorly baggage. And Perry and Whitford's characters both worked like gangbusters, in my opinion. For what it's worth.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 11:12 AM
I wonder who the mentor will be? On Sports Night is was Isaac, on WW is was Leo, but Wes got fired right off the bat, so I don't know if he will be the mentor to those crazy kids.

h.sapiens
09-19-2006, 11:15 AM
I caught one thing that might have been an in-joke. Or I could be reading too much into it.

When Jordan was introduced to Matt, she said "I couldn't be a bigger fan of yours." I wondered if this was meant to echo Chandler Bing's "Could you be more [adjective]?" speech pattern.

jacquilynne
09-19-2006, 11:29 AM
The Jordan McDeere character is pretty much modelled on Jamie Tarses, who was president of NBC Entertainment at 30 or 31 or somesuch similar age. So it shouldn't be entirely unbelievable that someone that young has the job, since someone that young has had the job.

Sunrazor
09-19-2006, 11:33 AM
Hey, is the Harriet Hayes character (the Christian blonde actress) inspired by Kristin Chenoweth?
I thought of Victoria Jackson (http://www.victoriajackson.com/) -- IIRC, Jackson got some undeserved flack for some of her non-SNL activities -- Christian music albums and the like. In the pilot, Harriet said she stood by the "Crazy Christian" sketch, and Jordan told Matt to lead with the sketch on the next show. I see Harriet getting a chance to speak for the overwhelming majority of un-crazy Christians, and I predict a speech about being tired of being lumped in with the radical right, about how her faith allows her to be pro-choice and a bunch of other issues that Christians are unfairly tarred with. Hollywood giving mainstream Christianity a voice -- wotta' concept!

WordMan
09-19-2006, 11:38 AM
I was wondering that too...isn't she a bit young to be the president of a network?

The inside poop, to my knowledge is that Amanda Peet's character is based on Jamie Tarses (http://www.variety.com/graphics/photos/mugt/tarses_jamie.jpg) who was the head of - what? - maybe programming or something very senior at ABC for about 1 - 2 years. She was young, attractive and aggressive and the TV biz supposedly chewed her up and spit her out.

So the whole "isn't she too young and pretty?" parts come from there. Whether or not you think she is a good actor and/or a good fit for this role is your call. I thought she did a great job and especially loved her exchange the Steven Weber's character about him having to sacrifice his balls based on Judd Hirsch's meltdown and the network's need to position itself effectively. It was funny and she came across as competent, aggressive and willing to speak truth to power in her world. And it positioned her character as a prime mover on the show. Good stuff.

Exapno Mapcase
09-19-2006, 11:39 AM
The Jordan McDeere character is pretty much modelled on Jamie Tarses, who was president of NBC Entertainment at 30 or 31 or somesuch similar age. So it shouldn't be entirely unbelievable that someone that young has the job, since someone that young has had the job.
Bingo.

http://www.hollywood.com/celebs/detail/id/188851
At age 32, Tarses became the youngest person and the first woman to preside over a network entertainment division. As President of ABC Entertainment, she reported to division Chairman Ted Harbert, who held her job before being promoted. This personal triumph followed an exceedingly eventful year at NBC Entertainment where she had spent the better part of a decade climbing swiftly up the corporate ladder. The daughter of celebrated sitcom producer, writer and director Jay Tarses ("The Bob Newhart Show", "Buffalo Bill", "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd"), Tarses used her not insignificant connections--then NBC Entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff got her first network job--to get her foot in the door....

And (http://www.teevee.org/archive/1997/10/05/):
Tarses, of course, was the wunderkind at NBC, the executive who shepherded the development of Mad About You and Friends, turning those dubious premises into ratings bonanzas. She had impressive TV bloodlines, the daughter of highly regarded producer Jay Tarses, whose successes included Buffalo Bill and Slap Maxwell and several other shows that in no way featured Dabney Coleman.

So it was little wonder that ABC would take a look at Tarses, see what this seemingly talented woman had done and covet her for their very own. The folks at Disney became so consumed by lust for Tarses that top executive/creepy guy Michael Ovitz began spreading rumors that NBC entertainment president Don Ohlmeyer had made clumsy passes at Tarses, apparently in the hopes that a clunky rumor would force the Peacock Network to let Tarses out of her contract.

And! ("http://www.eonline.com/News/Items/0,1,1679,00.html)
The camcorder has struck again. Captured on grainy, under-lit video this time: Friends star Matthew Perry and ABC TV executive Jamie Tarses--mid-smooch.

How much more Hollywood insider can you get?

Studio 60: The first network show deliberately designed to be annotated. Not a good thing, IMHO.

WordMan
09-19-2006, 11:47 AM
The Jordan McDeere character is pretty much modelled on Jamie Tarses, who was president of NBC Entertainment at 30 or 31 or somesuch similar age. So it shouldn't be entirely unbelievable that someone that young has the job, since someone that young has had the job.

D'oh - out-posted! You got here first! :)

twickster
09-19-2006, 11:48 AM
I spent the first ten minutes wondering how they thought they could get away with so blatantly ripping off "Network" and the eleventh minute going "oh."

I missed the first 15 minutes. Could you spoiler for me pls?

Cervaise
09-19-2006, 12:13 PM
I missed the first 15 minutes. Could you spoiler for me pls?In Network, news anchor, having recently been told of his pending termination, has live on-air meltdown, ranting against his industry. Bosses want to fire him until they realize ratings went through the roof. Build show around him.

In Studio 60, warhorse producer, having recently been creatively castrated by an oily apparatchik, has live on-air meltdown, ranting against his industry. Talking heads immediately draw comparison with Network. Difference: he gets fired anyway.

twickster
09-19-2006, 12:14 PM
What was the deal with Timothy Busfield and the 53 seconds?

ivylass
09-19-2006, 12:15 PM
Basically, Studio 60 is about to go live. At the last minute, the executive producer (Wes) is told by standards and practices that a skit must be cut because it's too controversial. Wes tries to stand up to him, but eventually folds. He fumes, and in the middle of the opening skit (some spoof of Pres Bush and VP Cheney) he storms on stage and begins a diatribe against censorship and the dumbing down of TV to avoid pissing off the FCC. At first, the audience thinks it's part of the skit, but he grabs their attention as he continues to rant.

The S&P guy storms into the control room demanding they cut Wes off. The TD, Timothy Busfield, hems and haws and says he hasn't done anything that would get them in trouble with the FCC. Finally, after 53 seconds, they cut to opening theme music.

At a dinner party, Jordan is being feted by her new bosses when she gets a phone call. It's her assistant, and as she tries to laugh off its importance, everyone else's phones and pagers go off as the news gets out that there was a live meltdown on broadcast TV.

There's a big meeting with the network execs, and as they wring their hands about lawsuits and FCC, Jordan points out that what they're really worried about is that Wes may be right. She takes her boss out to the hall and tells him she wants to rehire two men who used to helm the show but were fired four years ago, and have gone on to bigger and better things (one of them is getting a Writer's Guild award as they speak.)

Frylock
09-19-2006, 12:17 PM
I hope its okay if I just copy in the comments I made in another thread when I saw this premier a couple months ago:

I thought the following things about it:

1. Pleasant suprise: Brad Whitford didn't just make me think of Josh Lyman the whole time. It's subtle, but, his face moves a little differently, he speaks a little differently. He's a new character. I find this rare in TV actors.

2. Matthew Perry is just "Matthew Perry," but IMO there's nothing wrong with that. He fits the part.

3. The portrayal of the Christian character seemed off to me. She didn't seem to be saying things that I found realistic to the concept of her character. The performance was fine, (not great,) but for the most part I'm talking about the actual written dialogue. No examples come to mind at the moment, though.

4. Whoever is in charge of deciding which shades of which colors should be on screen at what times is doing something very interesting and pleasing to the eye. I'm not sure how it integrates into the work as a whole, except that I suspect it somehow adds to the "its all a veneer" theme that runs through the show. I'd have to watch one or two more times to confirm that intuition. But what I'm thinking is, the shiny and interesting colors jump out at you in this kind of "glitzy" way which seems to attempt to hide the perfectly ordinary objects giving rise to them. Hard to explain.

5. There's a scene at the very end comments about which I need to spoiler box:

The actors and the director have done a very nice job of transforming Whitford and Perry's characters before the viewers' eyes from semi-successful semi-losers to the "big men in charge." The scene where they inform the producer that he'll be keeping his job is where this really happens. Somehow, their faces look more adult, their suits look more shiny, they look bigger in relation to their environment. It's just a really nice effect. It indicates promising things, I think, for the series.


6. Dialogue was a little stilted at points, but it seemed compatible with the "Pilot Episode Effect" IMO.

7. Amanda Peet does a no-good job, unfortunately! I didn't believe her as a high-powered Exec. She was trying to be the rational, soft-spoken high-power exec, which is fine, but somehow she didn't pull it off right.

-FrL-

Frylock
09-19-2006, 12:19 PM
In Studio 60, warhorse producer, having recently been creatively castrated by an oily apparatchik, has live on-air meltdown, ranting against his industry. Talking heads immediately draw comparison with Network. Difference: he gets fired anyway.

Although I was aware of the Network parallel, I somehow missed the execs in Studio actually making reference to it. What did they say?

-FrL-

ivylass
09-19-2006, 12:20 PM
What was the deal with Timothy Busfield and the 53 seconds?

53 seconds is an eternity in broadcasting. Instead of cutting it off immediately, the TD, probably feeling loyalty to his exec producer, let him go off for a bit.

I think it's funny that if he had cut it off, the show wouldn't have hired Matt and Danny and it would have continued its slide into unfunniness (Peripheral Vision Man?)

twickster
09-19-2006, 12:20 PM
Ah, thanks ivylass.

(What's a TD, BTW?)

ivylass
09-19-2006, 12:22 PM
Although I was aware of the Network parallel, I somehow missed the execs in Studio actually making reference to it. What did they say?

-FrL-
I don't think they did. It was more how the news channels were reporting what happened.

ivylass
09-19-2006, 12:23 PM
Ah, thanks ivylass.

(What's a TD, BTW?)

Technical Director.

h.sapiens
09-19-2006, 12:29 PM
I don't think they did. It was more how the news channels were reporting what happened.

I thought that was the funniest part of the show. One after the other, each of 4 news channels makes a reference to "Network" or Howard Beale. It's a little implausible that the news shows (network or cable) would be covering this story simultaneously, within minutes of its happening late on a Friday night, but the effect was great.

brianjedi
09-19-2006, 12:46 PM
Ratings are in: 2nd behind CSI:Sheboygan with an 8.6/14, but it lost some viewers in the second half-hour. Understandable, since the second half-hour was kind of slow and exposition-y.

jrepka
09-19-2006, 12:55 PM
Jordan (Amanda Peet) is the new president, but president of what? Not the network, because Jack (Steven Weber) is her boss. I got that Ed Asner is the president of the company that owns the network (a la GE owning NBC.)

-Jack is the network president, Jordan is the president of the entertainment division.

-When they made the homage to Network explicit (by referring to it in the dialog) it occurred to me that it would encourage a lot of people to go out and rent this wonderful movie.

-Earlier in the evening, on another network, someone was joking about ensemble dramas of the CSI genre and made a reference to the "improbably beautiful female agent" character. I've got to admit that when they introduced Jordan that's the first thing I flashed on. I loved the show but it's going to take me a while not to think of her as the "improbably beautiful network president" character.

-Tina Fey and Alec Baldwin are great, and they're certainly not in direct competition with this show, but they've got a steep hill to climb to avoid unflattering comparisons.

Horatio Hellpop
09-19-2006, 01:05 PM
Awesome series premiere. Very glad I watched.

Hey, is the Harriet Hayes character (the Christian blonde actress) inspired by Kristin Chenoweth? I know Kristin was on The West Wing, but I wonder if she had a relationship with Sorkin at any point, or if there was any bad blood between them.


They dated until she released a Christian album and went on "The 700 Club" to perform.

I kid you not.

I don't know about their dating history, but Sorkin left The West Wing a year before Chenoweth joined the cast. I assumed the Harriet Hayes character was based on Victoria Jackson.

brianjedi
09-19-2006, 01:18 PM
I don't know about their dating history, but Sorkin left The West Wing a year before Chenoweth joined the cast. I assumed the Harriet Hayes character was based on Victoria Jackson.

I know that. They still dated, and she did release a Christian album and perform on "The 700 Club." It's so obviously her that she would probably have grounds for a lawsuit.

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/television/15531332.htm

amarinth
09-19-2006, 01:38 PM
I liked it, but Amanda Peet is way too young and dewy for that role. It should be played by Donna Murphy--it's depressing to see one of the best actresses of her generation reduced to a bit part.I know, I love Donna Murphy... pity they underuse her like that.

For me, not even Sorokin can make me not hate Amanda Peet, and he made me like Tom Cruise in that one specific role. And I hate that she's an integral part of the show. Maybe everyone else will hate her too and they'll Mandy her, somehow.

There was some really interesting camera work too (someone's sending the pilot to next year's emmys).

Bradley Whitford wasn't Josh, which I was worried about. He was this new guy, who happened to look very much like Josh, but not Josh. (I'm very amused that his wife is going to be on 30 Rock).

Other than that, it was great. I can't wait until next week.

Otto
09-19-2006, 01:38 PM
I don't think they did. It was more how the news channels were reporting what happened.
As noted, each of the talking heads referenced "Network" and Paddy Chayefsky. Peet turns to IIRC Weber and says something like "at least they know who Paddy Chayefsky is."

ivylass
09-19-2006, 02:03 PM
I'm curious...McNeer said she needed Matt and Danny for two years. I would assume that that's not two years real time, or it's going to be a very short run for Studio 60.

I'm so used to having TV time mirror real time (airing Christmas episodes in December, the WW universe fairly matched real universe, as far as having elections roughly every four years) I'm wondering if after two years Matt and Danny will stick around, or they'll stretch it out like MASH stretched out the Korean War.

Draelin
09-19-2006, 02:27 PM
I'm curious...McNeer said she needed Matt and Danny for two years. I would assume that that's not two years real time, or it's going to be a very short run for Studio 60.
I figured they'd tackle it when the two years were up, probably renewing their contract after a multi-episode battle.

I enjoyed it. I can't wait until they're done with setup and exposition and move on to the day-to-day operations a la Sports Night and West Wing. They'll get there, I'm confident.

My roommate and I are having problems switching the names, of course. They're going to be "Josh and Chandler" at least for a few more weeks, and the confusion of having a character named Danny not be Timothy Busfield is also going to throw me off. Thank Og that Matthew Perry is the character named Matt, or I'd be totally screwed. (And as an aside, does Sorkin have a friend named Danny, or something? Three shows, three prominent characters with the name.)

Misnomer
09-19-2006, 02:37 PM
-Jack is the network president, Jordan is the president of the entertainment division.According to the linked article in brianjedi's post, Jordan McDeere (Amanda Peet) is the network president and Jack Rudolph (Steven Weber) is the network chairman.

Horatio Hellpop
09-19-2006, 02:44 PM
I know that. They still dated, and she did release a Christian album and perform on "The 700 Club." It's so obviously her that she would probably have grounds for a lawsuit.

She might, except that the depiction of the character is reasonably flattering. She's depicted as attractive, capable, intelligent, and (unlike Chenoweth) tall. In a one-upsmanship bout with Chubbsie, she clearly demolished him. I doubt Kristin's all that upset about it. And I suspect Victoria's downright gleeful!

Elendil's Heir
09-19-2006, 02:58 PM
I liked it, all in all. The dynamic between the Matthew Perry and Bradley Whitford characters was good, esp. at the awards dinner and when they were sitting in that sawed-in-half fake taxicab. The Amanda Peet character has potential; the fact that she's so good-looking is obviously something she uses to her advantage in boardroom politics. Underestimate her at your peril, seems to me. And what do you want to bet that when (not if) she turns around "Studio 60," the oily network suit (Steven Weber) will take credit?

I'll be tuning in again. And will we all be calling it "S4" or "S60"?

Elendil's Heir
09-19-2006, 03:02 PM
Excuse me, but I called him VP Otter because I blanked out on his character's name. I wasn't being cutesy, and I knew people who were fans of WW would know what I was talking about, and if you weren't, it wasn't that big a deal.

No prob. Tim Matheson as Vice President John Hoynes, FWIW.

Dewey Finn
09-19-2006, 03:06 PM
I don't know about their dating history, but Sorkin left The West Wing a year before Chenoweth joined the cast. I assumed the Harriet Hayes character was based on Victoria Jackson.
There was an article in New York Times on September 11 in which Sorkin confirmed that Hayes is based on Chenoweth (and Amanda Peet's character is based on Jamie Tarses).

annieclaus
09-19-2006, 10:42 PM
That's walking while having a conversation. I think it's a Sorkin trademark, and it's quite tricky to do, but it looks cool.

Ummmm, it's done in every tv drama/dramedy. It's meant to put action into scenes that might otherwise look boring because folks are just talking. To me it looks stupid. . . walking for the sake of walking.

ivylass
09-20-2006, 07:07 AM
Sorry, I disagree. I often have conversations with co-workers while walking down the hall. Sometimes when you're busy that's what you have to do.

I think I heard something wrong....in the opening monologue, DL was pumping up the audience, asking how many had watched the show in high school, how many in junior high, and how many since the show started in 1996? Then he said they were celebrating 20 years on the air.

Did I hear that wrong?

WhyNot
09-20-2006, 07:53 AM
I think I heard something wrong....in the opening monologue, DL was pumping up the audience, asking how many had watched the show in high school, how many in junior high, and how many since the show started in 1996? Then he said they were celebrating 20 years on the air.

Did I hear that wrong?
Yes, you heard it wrong, but it was hardly your fault. Hughley's dialect made it tricky, but I was able to hear "1986" - the second time we rewound it. My husband couldn't hear it even a number of times later, and won't even believe the closed captioning (which said "1986").

Draelin
09-20-2006, 07:55 AM
Yes, you heard it wrong, but it was hardly your fault. Hughley's dialect made it tricky, but I was able to hear "1986" - the second time we rewound it. My husband couldn't hear it even a number of times later, and won't even believe the closed captioning (which said "1986").
Ohh. I thought he said 1996 and "20 Seasons", so I just assumed they did half-year seasons, because otherwise it made absolutely no sense to me. :)

ShibbOleth
09-20-2006, 08:37 AM
Got to watch it last night. Overall I really enjoyed it. Sorkin still writes some of the tightest dialogue one will see anywhere, even if he does stretch credulity at times. I thought both Peet and Weber were a bit smirky, but hope that will wear off. Peet was also milking the starry eyed, seeing the future out in the distance thing a bit much. Brad Whitford is showing his age, which I think is a good thing. His face is becoming very interesting, a la John Spencer.

Did anyone else notice that Rob Corddry's little brother, Nathan, is one of the key characters? (at first I thought it was DJ Qualls)

I like that Sorkin seems to be developing a nuanced Christian character. Between that and all of the potential sexual and pharmaceutical tension I doubt we'll be lacking for plot lines in the near future.

Nars Glinley
09-20-2006, 09:28 AM
Overall, I thought it was a pretty good show. It is going to be difficult to not associate Perry's character with Chandler although I don't know if we're even supposed to. My problem with the Jordan character is that they seem to be setting her up as a fulltime, regular character. That would seem to be a little unrealistic for either the president of a network or entertainment (whichever she is).

Sunrazor
09-20-2006, 09:47 AM
References to "Network": If you recorded it, replay the emergency meeting at network HQ when the new prez begins to assert her authority. She says something like, "They're using our name and Paddy Chayefsky in the same sentence. That' can't be a bad thing." Something like that.

Gadarene
09-20-2006, 10:18 AM
To me it looks stupid. . . walking for the sake of walking.

The difference is that, at least in Sorkin shows, they're walking because they have somewhere to be, and talking along the way.

ivylass
09-20-2006, 11:37 AM
Yes, you heard it wrong, but it was hardly your fault. Hughley's dialect made it tricky, but I was able to hear "1986" - the second time we rewound it. My husband couldn't hear it even a number of times later, and won't even believe the closed captioning (which said "1986").

I'm with your husband. I watched the premier and again on tape with my daughter, and both times I could have sworn he said 1996.

cbawlmer
09-20-2006, 11:54 AM
I thought he said 1996 too. Wait, does the show take place in 2016?

ivylass
09-20-2006, 12:06 PM
See post 75. Apparently it's a badly mumbled 1986.

cbawlmer
09-20-2006, 12:20 PM
Oh, I get it. I know he meant 1986, but it didn't come out very clearly.

After my husband and I watched the show, we started talking about what was really happening on SNL in 1986. Wasn't that the year the cast included Robert Downey Jr., Anthony Michael Hall and Joan Cusack? The year they eventually apologized for the quality of and wanted to pretend never happened?

I hope the Judd Hirsch character shows up again. Is he supposed to be a recurring character? If not, that was a really good one-off performance.

ShibbOleth
09-20-2006, 02:16 PM
I hope the Judd Hirsch character shows up again. Is he supposed to be a recurring character? If not, that was a really good one-off performance.
If you go to IMDB it shows most of the recurring characters and how many episodes they're in (that have been shot... most right now is 6). Judd Hirsch doesn't appear on that list. I think he'll be a major, recurring character like John Amos was on West Wing -- not quite full time but around enough to be known. Especially as he apparently has history with two of the main characters, both good and bad was implied.

WhyNot
09-20-2006, 02:43 PM
See post 75. Apparently it's a badly mumbled 1986.
Badly enunciated, anyway. The best I can describe it is he held the "nnn" from the end of "nineteennnnn" too long and had a very open vowel sound somewhere between an "ai" and a "eye", so it came out "Nahnteennuhdeesix." "uhdee', if you will, after the extended "nnn", sounds ambiguous as best. Took me a couple of times to hear it, and I have some training in speech pathology. If I was the director, I would have had him reloop it, because it did cause confusion.

Exapno Mapcase
09-20-2006, 04:06 PM
I heard it as 1996 as well. So let me throw out a WAG.

It was in the script originally as 1996 and 10 years. Then somebody noticed that The Daily Show was celebrating its 10th anniversary, which of course means that it started in 1996. Not wanting people to make that connection, Sorkin changed it to 1986 and 20 years.

Hughley botched it by remembering the original line but trying for a last minute save. It was still the best take of a difficult and noisy scene so they left it in, especially since they knew what the line should be and that made them hear it more clearly than the rest of the audience.

Kinda convoluted, I know, but for sure I heard 1996. And with so many others hearing the same some explanation is needed.

carnivorousplant
09-20-2006, 04:15 PM
In a one-upsmanship bout with Chubbsie, she clearly demolished him.
Easy to do when you're the boss. :)
Who played Chubbsie, BTW?

Auntbeast
09-20-2006, 04:31 PM
Eek! My daughter ate my post.

Am I delusional, or was there a similar scene in West Wing in the "coming together of the team" where someone said "Is he for real?" because when Matt & Danny said that to each other it rang very familiar.

I love the way Sorkin brings in a crew. He brings in best friends and best enemies because they are the best for the job. I'm a sucker for that sort of sequence. It is one of the few redeeming qualities of the movie Armaggedon, however, I think Sorkin does it best.

Perhaps I am so spoiled by Sorkin it didn't seem especially dialogue heavy to me, maybe I'll be more aware of it on my second viewing. Then again, that is another place where he has me by the short and curlies. I love his dialogue.

This is now in my Season Pass list as the coveted #1 spot. (That which must be recorded or people die) No, I don't care how much my husband likes Survivor, it is my damned Tivo!

WhyNot
09-20-2006, 04:36 PM
Kinda convoluted, I know, but for sure I heard 1996. And with so many others hearing the same some explanation is needed.
Could be, but the closed captioning did say "1986".

Hmm...slow Dope day today if this is the only nit we have to keep picking at! Maybe we should go trade some more pirate jokes in MPSIMS. :D

Horatio Hellpop
09-20-2006, 04:50 PM
Easy to do when you're the boss. :)
Who played Chubbsie, BTW?

That would be Nate Torrence (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1535594/), whose character is actually called "Dylan." He's called "Chubbsie" in those CapitalOne commercials with David Spade.

cbawlmer
09-20-2006, 05:02 PM
Am I delusional, or was there a similar scene in West Wing in the "coming together of the team" where someone said "Is he for real?" because when Matt & Danny said that to each other it rang very familiar.


Yes, but it was "the real deal." That was in a flashback in "In the Shadow of Two Gunmen, Part 1" to when Josh and Sam joined the Bartlet for America team. Josh went to visit Sam on his way to New Hampshire, and promised to come back and get him if Bartlet was indeed "the real deal." Josh ultimately pulls Sam out of some meeting where he's brokering the sale of an oil tanker IIRC, and they leave to join the campaign together.

jsc1953
09-20-2006, 05:44 PM
Did Rick & Ron (or something like that) -- the two bad writers, ever appear on screen?

carnivorousplant
09-20-2006, 06:05 PM
He's called "Chubbsie" in those CapitalOne commercials with David Spade.
Ah, that's where I've seen him. And I pride myself on not watching commercials. :)

MaxTheVool
09-20-2006, 07:11 PM
Did Rick & Ron (or something like that) -- the two bad writers, ever appear on screen?

I don't think so. I wonder if they never WILL appear on screen, and their malignant unseen presence will become a standing joke?

Naaah, seems to cheap for Sorkin. And actually, having well-meaning but just-not-very-talented people hanging around would be interesting.

brianjedi
09-20-2006, 08:04 PM
I don't think so. I wonder if they never WILL appear on screen, and their malignant unseen presence will become a standing joke?

Naaah, seems to cheap for Sorkin. And actually, having well-meaning but just-not-very-talented people hanging around would be interesting.

Ricky and Ron are gonna be present. One of them's being played by Evan Handler, who was Bruno Gianelli's consultant Doug on TWW.

And D.L. Hughley pretty clearly said 1986. I don't know what's wrong with all you people.

Shoeless
09-20-2006, 10:10 PM
Amanda Peet was the low point. I'd read that she was supposed to be the big breakout character for the show, but I thought she was way too wide-eyed and naive for the position, and she only used one facial expression in every scene. She was blown off the screen by everybody in sight.
Yeah, it looked to me like that one expression was a smug self-satisfied smirk. It seemed very inappropriate in most scenes.

And I'm still trying to figure out how Matthew Perry's character, who had back surgery two days before and was full o' pain killers, was able to bound up a flight of stairs two at a time then fold himself into the back seat of a prop taxi cab.

Exapno Mapcase
09-20-2006, 10:22 PM
People in Hollywood get muuuuccccchhhhh better painkillers than the rest of us. :)

brianjedi
09-21-2006, 12:53 AM
Yeah, it looked to me like that one expression was a smug self-satisfied smirk. It seemed very inappropriate in most scenes.

And I'm still trying to figure out how Matthew Perry's character, who had back surgery two days before and was full o' pain killers, was able to bound up a flight of stairs two at a time then fold himself into the back seat of a prop taxi cab.

I'd say Matthew Perry knows what's realistic for a guy on painkillers, what with that whole Vicodin addiction he had.

Snooooopy
09-21-2006, 01:07 AM
Sorry, I disagree. I often have conversations with co-workers while walking down the hall. Sometimes when you're busy that's what you have to do.

I think I heard something wrong....in the opening monologue, DL was pumping up the audience, asking how many had watched the show in high school, how many in junior high, and how many since the show started in 1996? Then he said they were celebrating 20 years on the air.

Did I hear that wrong?

He said 996. The show originated as a showcase for Viking warriors to tell stories about their latest raids. "Peripheral Vision Sven" was a particularly notable warrior so named because he had unparalleled powers of observation.

Gadarene
09-21-2006, 08:27 AM
Ricky and Ron are gonna be present. One of them's being played by Evan Handler, who was Bruno Gianelli's consultant Doug on TWW.

And the other one is played by Carlos Jacott, who's done a number of small things but is downright beloved by fans of the movie Kicking and Screaming (not the Will Ferrell version) for his portrayal of Otis.

Cervaise
09-21-2006, 09:06 AM
And the other one is played by Carlos Jacott, who's done a number of small things but is downright beloved by fans of the movie Kicking and Screaming (not the Will Ferrell version) for his portrayal of Otis.He's also on a very short list of actors who have managed the Whedon Hat Trick, appearing in Buffy, Angel, and Firefly.

Misnomer
09-21-2006, 10:22 AM
He's also on a very short list of actors who have managed the Whedon Hat Trick, appearing in Buffy, Angel, and Firefly.He was also on an episode of The West Wing ... don't see any Sports Night in his bio, though. :)

ivylass
09-21-2006, 11:36 AM
Did Rick & Ron (or something like that) -- the two bad writers, ever appear on screen?

I wonder if they'll be like Ed and Larry, always together and you can't tell which is which.

No one taking me up on my bet on how many episodes air before Josh Malina shows up? I think he's been in every Sorkin project, including a cameo in A Few Good Men, where his two lines where "Yes, Sir?" and "Yes, Sir."

jsc1953
09-21-2006, 11:40 AM
No one taking me up on my bet on how many episodes air before Josh Malina shows up? I think he's been in every Sorkin project, including a cameo in [i]A Few Good Men[/b], where his two lines where "Yes, Sir?" and "Yes, Sir."

It took 3 years to get Josh Malina onto West Wing, so it may take a while. Is his Sports Night girlfriend still working on Numbers? And Felicity Huffman (who had a one-shot role in WW) has a good gig at the moment, so she won't be back anytime soon.

Gadarene
09-21-2006, 12:34 PM
And Felicity Huffman (who had a one-shot role in WW) has a good gig at the moment, so she won't be back anytime soon.

Back as in "on Sutdio 60," or back as in "back on Studio 60"? Because she played herself in the pilot. :)

brianjedi
09-21-2006, 01:09 PM
Considering that Malina's been in everything Sorkin's done, and he's Tim Busfield's brother-in-law, I'd say we'll see him eventually. Were he a bit older, he could have had Steven Weber's role.

I figure Janel Moloney or Richard Schiff will pop up at some point, too.

Dewey Finn
09-21-2006, 02:16 PM
It might fun if it became clear at some point that Studio 60 exists in the same universe as the West Wing, like if they did a joke about President Matt Santos.

jacquilynne
09-21-2006, 02:22 PM
It might fun if it became clear at some point that Studio 60 exists in the same universe as the West Wing, like if they did a joke about President Matt Santos.
Since they've already done a joke about President George Bush, that seems like it can't be true.

Sean Factotum
09-21-2006, 03:09 PM
I hope the Judd Hirsch character shows up again. Is he supposed to be a recurring character? If not, that was a really good one-off performance.
Since he's got that weekly gig on CBS' Numb3rs, he probably doesn't have enough time to show up but once in awhile. But really, his character isn't really important anymore, is he? It was established that he was the mentor to our Two Heroes, and that the banned script was written by Matt four years before. This show is going to be about the new direction the show within the show is taking. No need to dwell on the past. Oh, and the future Mrs. Factotum, Sabrina Lloyd (who played Natalie on Sports Night) isn't on it anymore. She was replaced at the beginning of last season by Diane Farr.

I do look forward to Matt and Danny going head to head with Rick & Ron, those two writers they can't fire. That should be good for one or two episodes. Evan Handler was the bald aid that kept knocking heads with Toby in TWW, right?

I heard it as 1996 as well. So let me throw out a WAG.

It was in the script originally as 1996 and 10 years. Then somebody noticed that The Daily Show was celebrating its 10th anniversary, which of course means that it started in 1996. Not wanting people to make that connection, Sorkin changed it to 1986 and 20 years.

Hughley botched it by remembering the original line but trying for a last minute save. It was still the best take of a difficult and noisy scene so they left it in, especially since they knew what the line should be and that made them hear it more clearly than the rest of the audience. But this show wasn't broadcast live. Any first-year looper worth the ink his diploma is printed with could make it clear if that's what really happened.

Hughley botched it by remembering the original line but trying for a last minute save. It was still the best take of a difficult and noisy scene so they left it in, especially since they knew what the line should be and that made them hear it more clearly than the rest of the audience.

Draelin
09-21-2006, 03:19 PM
I was just thinking (rather than working) about how Sorkin reused a couple Sports Night concepts on West Wing--like Dan embarrassing himself to Hillary Clinton/Sam doing the same with some columnist. Or the fact that Jeremy and Sam both found out that their fathers had been engaged in long term affairs, and so on.

I am really hoping Thespos comes to visit Studio 60. :)

ivylass
09-21-2006, 03:44 PM
I was just thinking (rather than working) about how Sorkin reused a couple Sports Night concepts on West Wing--like Dan embarrassing himself to Hillary Clinton/Sam doing the same with some columnist. Or the fact that Jeremy and Sam both found out that their fathers had been engaged in long term affairs, and so on.



He does that quite a bit. He even used the phrase "Her legs go all the way down to the floor" on both shows.

Matt and Danny need a mentor, a la Isaac/Leo.

MaxTheVool
09-21-2006, 08:43 PM
Hughley botched it by remembering the original line but trying for a last minute save. It was still the best take of a difficult and noisy scene so they left it in, especially since they knew what the line should be and that made them hear it more clearly than the rest of the audience.

After all, it's entirely possible that Hughley's character would randomly misspeak. I mean, people do stumble and slur words in real life, for no reason at all.

Little Nemo
09-21-2006, 08:54 PM
The weird thing is I watched the episode twice and it sounded like Hughley said 1986 online and 1996 on the broadcast.

Khadaji
09-24-2006, 10:49 AM
I just got to see it. I enjoyed it. Unlike many of the others here, I liked Chandler Bing, but have no problem with Matthew Perry in this new role.

I usually don't watch dramas so I'll be curious to see if this can hold my attention, but for now, I'll be watching again.

Misnomer
09-24-2006, 10:10 PM
At first I thought y'all were nuts about Hughley saying "1996": I'd seen the pilot three times, and never noticed it before. But it's re-running on Bravo right now, I turned up the volume and made a point of listening to that line, and he does say 1996! :eek: I can't think of any accent or patois or speech pattern that would make "eighty-six" sound like "ninety-six." Bizarre.

Typo Negative
09-25-2006, 12:09 AM
The weird thing is I watched the episode twice and it sounded like Hughley said 1986 online and 1996 on the broadcast.I did too. I heard it as 1996 the first viewing and 1986 in the second.

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