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View Full Version : A dozen double yolks


feebee
10-07-2006, 08:39 AM
I just bought a dozen jumbo eggs and they all had double yolks. Why would this be?

Kalhoun
10-07-2006, 09:05 AM
I just bought a dozen jumbo eggs and they all had double yolks. Why would this be?
That happened to me once. I thought I was the Lone Ranger! It's so cool...I wonder what the odds are of happening to the same person twice in one lifetime.

WhyNot
10-07-2006, 09:09 AM
That happened to me once, too! Weirdest thing.

I know they separate the double-yolked eggs out by candling, and those get sent off to be sold to food service, bakeries, that sort of thing. My guess is that the package I (and you) got was set down on the wrong conveyor belt and ended up in the grocery store.

Because double-yolked eggs tend to be larger than other eggs, it's more likely to happen when you buy Jumbo than any smaller size.

Interesting side note: when we tried to hatch chicks in fifth grade, my egg was a double yolk. Both yolks were fertile, and both embryos grew quite large before one of them died. It poisoned the other one, and neither hatched, but it was fascinating to watch "my twins" develop together!

More information on double yolks. (http://www.minkhollow.ca/HatchingProgram/Candling/Fresh/Double.html)

Jake
10-07-2006, 01:53 PM
Seems to me that when I was a Kid (back in the fifties) we got a lot more double-yoke eggs than today. I did get one last month though, in a package of "AA" eggs from the grocery store. Hm.

jjimm
10-07-2006, 02:01 PM
Old hens.

groman
10-07-2006, 02:21 PM
Interesting side note: when we tried to hatch chicks in fifth grade, my egg was a double yolk. Both yolks were fertile, and both embryos grew quite large before one of them died. It poisoned the other one, and neither hatched, but it was fascinating to watch "my twins" develop together!


Sorry for the hijack but how do you watch eggs develop... isn't it just an egg? As in, opaque and roughly the same shape throughout?

silenus
10-07-2006, 02:51 PM
We got a dozen of those about a year ago. Tres weird.

spingears
10-07-2006, 03:10 PM
I just bought a dozen jumbo eggs and they all had double yolks. Why would this be?WAG The flock may have had double barrelled egg laying physiology.

Possibly a flock of genetically engineered chickens with enchanced abilities to produce high nutrition double yolk eggs?

Some other explanation?

A.R. Cane
10-07-2006, 03:11 PM
Sorry for the hijack but how do you watch eggs develop... isn't it just an egg? As in, opaque and roughly the same shape throughout?

It's called "candling". Here are some examples: http://www.homestead.com/shilala/candling.html

WhyNot
10-07-2006, 06:23 PM
Sorry for the hijack but how do you watch eggs develop... isn't it just an egg? As in, opaque and roughly the same shape throughout?
Yep, candling like A.R. Cane's link. Teachers can purchase whole kits, including incubators, fertilized eggs and very bright lights to teach units on embryology. We each wrote our name on an egg and followed it for it's whole cycle on past hatching. We had to candle our eggs and sketch what we saw every few days. Once you're used to it, you can see a surprising amount of detail - even their hearts beating. When they both stopped beating, we knew they were dead, and I had to share an egg with someone else. (The teacher let me break open the egg and poke at the dead chicks though, which was SO cool...uh...if you're into that kind of thing, which I guess I was...)

I wonder what happens to the chicks? We didn't get to take them home, even the ones that did hatch.

A.R. Cane
10-07-2006, 06:47 PM
My granny had chickens, Bantams (Banties) and Rhode Islands Reds (Reds) as I recall. She candled eggs w/ some homemade rig, I can't recall how it was made.
It always makes me smile when I see people buying brown eggs at the supermarket, for about a 20-30% premium. So many people think brown eggs are superior to white and it's only the color of the chicken that makes the difference.
I wonder if anyone's tried marketing speckled chicken eggs? They ought to bring a real good price. ;)

hawksgirl
10-07-2006, 06:58 PM
This happened to me once, but it was a pack of 18 eggs while we were making Christmas cookies one year. It probably has something to do with the nutrition level of the chickens' food and something a bit screwy physiologically.

Now that I think of it, chickens only ever have one of two ovaries functioning. Perhaps this is what happens when they somehow have two functioning ovaries?

Harmonious Discord
10-07-2006, 07:05 PM
Some hens in all breeds will lay double yolk eggs. A hen that lays a double yolk egg, tends to do it most of the time. Some breeds will have a higher percentage of hens that lay double yolk eggs. We got eggs from local farmers many times when I was a kid, and the eggs can vary a lot more than you are used to seeing in the stores. The egg lady had a brown egg laying smaller breed hen, that almost always had double eggs and a couple had three yolks over the years.

panache45
10-07-2006, 07:41 PM
When I was a kid in the '50s, we bought chickens and eggs from a local farmer. It wasn't unusual to find double yolks, and occasionally we found a triple. But the best thing was finding unlaid eggs inside the chicken, usually without shells and in various sizes. I guess back then, the farmers didn't separate their egg-laying chickens from the ones to be eaten.

Harmonious Discord
10-07-2006, 08:47 PM
The lady that sold eggs had a rotation on the hens. They produced eggs good for a couple years. Fifty to a hundred chicks hatched out each spring. Butcher the ones that have laid for two years in the summer. Many of the farmers raised a few dozen from eggs each year to butcher by fall. Grandma kept all the feathers to make her pillows for the beds. A big old wash tub with a fire under it to scald the birds for plucking. Yeah it was messy and I don't eat chicken, because of another incident later in life.

Harmonious Discord
10-07-2006, 08:52 PM
I actualy got some eggs from the lady that were about an inch and a have in size. They were great , because they were kid sized. You had many shades and shapes. It's also why I learned to always crack an egg into a bowl and transfer them to the others, in case of a developing egg. Who needs a bloody yolk or chick embryo in the cake.

MEBuckner
10-07-2006, 10:11 PM
I wonder what happens to the chicks? We didn't get to take them home, even the ones that did hatch.
We, um, sent them to live on a, uh, a farm, where they'll be able to run free and, uh, stuff.

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