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View Full Version : Pop songs that somehow got past the censor, 1955-1985


Wee Bairn
02-15-2007, 09:10 AM
In other words, songs that were played on the radio intact, despite highly "offensive" lines. For example, the AOR station I listened to in the 70's always played the album version of the Jefferson Starship song "Miracles" intact, complete with the line "I got a taste of the real world/When I went down on you girl"- I didn't know it was dirty at the time, though.

One that did not get passed the censors is funny, so I'm told- I don't remember it. Supposedly some stations changed the line in Jethro Tull's "Locomotive Breath" from "got him by the balls" to "got him by the fun" for airplay.

Pushkin
02-15-2007, 10:10 AM
Not sure about pre-1985, but I notice with a little amusement that some local radio stations here in Belfast play songs unedited that BBC Radio 1 would carefully edit for somewhat naughty lines, even during the day :)

RealityChuck
02-15-2007, 10:19 AM
The Wikipedia says the line for Good Golly Miss Molly: "Sure likes to ball" predates "ball" meaning "sex," but the OED disagrees*. In any case, stations continued to play the song long after the sexual meaning was established.

*1955 W. GADDIS Recognitions II. i. 308 He used to bring her down here to shock her, and then take her home and ball her...{em}Edna? said Otto, unable to swallow.{em}With him?

Ludovic
02-15-2007, 10:21 AM
Who are you....Who the fuck are you?

Zeldar
02-15-2007, 10:22 AM
One thing to keep in mind is that some of the "offensive" words and phrases in old songs didn't become "offensive" to the general public, and therefore not the censors, until well after the records got to be hits. In some cases the words would be code in some subculture that had yet to make it into common parlance.

Of course, after the man in the street became aware that things like "baby, you sure love to ball" didn't actually refer to an affinity for dancing, then the powers that be got up in arms about how lewd and corruptive these vile lyrics were.

It takes reference sources like Urban Dictionary to give you the real lowdown on what some popular word or phrase means to the subculture using it before it gets to be mainstream.

I suggest that this feature of lyrics writing continues to elude censors' abilities to keep up with the language.

Vlad/Igor
02-15-2007, 10:24 AM
Blondie: Rapture. Debbie Harry stretches out the words "finger fucking" to the point where you can't really tell what she's saying unless you read the lyrics. I was pretty shocked when I learned that, after hearing Rapture played so much.

Vlad/Igor

Annie-Xmas
02-15-2007, 10:26 AM
White Rabbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rabbit_(song)) by Jefferson Airplane snuck drug references by the censors.

Spoke
02-15-2007, 10:28 AM
The Wikipedia says the line for Good Golly Miss Molly: "Sure likes to ball" predates "ball" meaning "sex," but the OED disagrees*. In any case, stations continued to play the song long after the sexual meaning was established.

For that matter, "rocking and rolling" started as a euphemism for sex.

The way you're rockin' and a-rollin'
Can't hear your momma call

That whole song is not-too-subtle double entendre.

Wee Bairn
02-15-2007, 10:30 AM
Vlad/Igor- if you are referring to the part of the song I think you are, it is actually finger popping.

But another Blondie one, if they ever played it on the radio, is from "Look Good in Blue"- "I could give you some head and shoulders to lie on", with a slight pause after the word "head".

Spice Weasel
02-15-2007, 10:39 AM
Aerosmith's "Walk This Way"

"You ain't seen nothin' 'til you're down on the muffin."

The song references, among other things, having a threesome with his neighbor and her sister and her cousin.

Aerosmith's "Rag Doll"

Rag doll, livin' in a movie
Hot tramp, Daddy's little cutie...

Hot time, get it while it's easy
Don't mind, come on up and see me
Rag Doll, baby won't you do me
Like you done before

Old Tin Lizzie, do it 'til you're dizzy...... etc.

Well, just about every Aerosmith song ever. ;)

The Knack's "My Sharona"

Running down the length of my thighs, Sharona
Never gonna stop, give it up. Such a dirty mind.
Always get it up for the touch
of the younger kind.

The Beatles' "Why Don't We Do It In the Road"

The Beatles' "Don't Let Me Down"

And from the first time that she really done me
Oo she done me, she done me good
I guess nobody ever really done me
Oo she done me, she done me good

Madonna's "Like a Virgin"

And during the bridge of her 1983 hit "Lucky Star" her voice drops really low and sultry and she sings, "Shine your heavenly body tonight." I think we all know where she was going with that one.

Oh, i guess citing Madonna songs is cheating... ;)

PoorYorick
02-15-2007, 10:42 AM
White Rabbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rabbit_(song)) by Jefferson Airplane snuck drug references by the censors.
No particular references at hand, but doesn't this pretty much describe Psychadelic Rock as a whole? They generally used metaphors rather than saying, "I took this really good acid and saw some really cool hallucinations, man," but drug references abounded nonetheless.

Zeldar
02-15-2007, 10:48 AM
FWIW, and in the same spirit as my earlier post here, I have yet to learn the true meanings to a large portion of Steely Dan's lyrics. I love their music, but tend to ignore the lyrics. I do that with most music, though. Lyrics rarely get my attention. That may be why the nonsense syllables in early RnR songs (like be-bop-a-lula and a-wop-bop-a-loo-bop-a-lop-bam-boom) impressed me as much as the lyrics that tended toward sense.

What I truly love those is how some "songs" can grind out three minutes worth of sound on one and two syllables. Heard one just the other night that had maybe three. Would you believe I don't even remember what the three words were? It did have a decent beat, though. And whoever was singing it really felt the impact of those words because she almost had an orgasm. Or so it appeared.

WOOKINPANUB
02-15-2007, 10:50 AM
"Not me baby, I'm too precious; fuck off" as snarled by Chrissy Hynde in the Pretenders' Precious. I heard it on KROQ in LA many times when it first came out, usually whilst being driven to school by my dad :eek: I doubt they still play it that way now.

One that I've been hearing lately is the Offspring's shameless ( well, shameful, really) rip-off of the Beatles' Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da, in which one line says "my friend's got a girlfriend and he hates that bitch" and another which says "my friends got a boyfriend, man she hates that dick". I know we've been hearing "bitch" at least since Elton sang about her being back, but when did it become commonplace to say "dick"? I ask this as I listen to Everlast's "What its Like" with the word "whore" safely edited out. WTF?

silenus
02-15-2007, 10:51 AM
Pictures of Lily

Rattlesnake Shake

Rosie

All get airplay, and all are about masturbation.

Not to mention Money:

Money, its a hit.
Dont give me that do goody good bullshit.

Although the single, radio version blanks out the last syllable. But they seem to have stopped playing that version years ago.

Spoke
02-15-2007, 10:51 AM
The Rolling Stones - "Let It Bleed (http://www.lyricsfreak.com/r/rolling+stones/let+it+bleed_20117892.html)":

Yeah, we all need someone we can cream on
And if you want to, well you can cream on me

Dung Beetle
02-15-2007, 11:02 AM
Who are you....Who the fuck are you?
I always fantasize that if I were a DJ, I'd do a "Curse Words Weekend" and just play all the songs that have one or two little bad words in them. There are scads of them that get played all the time...Leroy Brown, Dirty Laundry, Rich Girl, Bad Blood, etc.

picker
02-15-2007, 11:10 AM
Let's not forget Ted Nugent's Cat Scratch Fever

Annie-Xmas
02-15-2007, 11:12 AM
Chuck Berry's My Ding-A-Ling

Fiddle Peghead
02-15-2007, 11:16 AM
I've read that Paul McCartney kicks off "I Saw Her Standing There" from the Please Please Me album with the words, "One, two, three, FUCK!" I've listened to this a lot to try and confirm it in my own mind, but I am not so sure I agree. I have, however, decided to believe that it is true, based purely on the coolness factor.

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 11:20 AM
National Lampoon's album "Radio Dinner" exists in two editions, due to obscenity. On the track, "Magical Misery Tour", which parodies an angry John Lennon, the lyrics are mostly obscenities. I'm not sure why it was then re-pressed with all the obscenities bleeped out. There are so many bleeps you can't tell what the song is about!

The Who actually made a single version for public release and radio, in which Roger redid the lyric to say "who the hell are you?", but I don't think it gets much play nowadays. I suspect many have never heard it.

Odd how you can still hear Styx' "Light Up", but nobody plays The Monks' "Drugs In My Pocket." The latter is not even listed in Billboard (not only did it not enter the Hot 100, it didn't even Bubble Under), but it was #1 in several markets in Canada. Incidentally, I played that record on a station where Dusty Springfield's "Son Of A Preacher Man" was banned from airplay. WTF?

IvoryTowerDenizen
02-15-2007, 11:21 AM
Lou Reed Walk on the Wild Side


But she never lost her head
even when she was given head
She says, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
said, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
and the coloured girls go...


Always suprises me when I hear it on the radio.

Contrapuntal
02-15-2007, 11:24 AM
Rolling Stones -- You'd make a dead man come."

Steely Dan -- "Show biz kids / Makin' movies of themselves / You know they don't give a fuck about anybody else."

Evil Captor
02-15-2007, 11:35 AM
Don't forget "If You See Kay"

And I KNOW Lady Marmalade must be tremendously dirty, but I cant understand most of the words.

vivalostwages
02-15-2007, 11:39 AM
Pearl Jam's "Jeremy": Some stations bleep it when they get to the line "Seemed a harmless little fuck" and some don't.

vivalostwages
02-15-2007, 11:41 AM
:smack: Ooops, that was post-1985. Never mind.

Spoons
02-15-2007, 11:44 AM
Odd how you can still hear Styx' "Light Up", but nobody plays The Monks' "Drugs In My Pocket." The latter is not even listed in Billboard (not only did it not enter the Hot 100, it didn't even Bubble Under), but it was #1 in several markets in Canada.I well remember the Monks and "Drugs in my Pocket." Couldn't get away from it in the Toronto market in the early 1980s; they got airplay on every station that mattered and the Bad Habits LP seemed to be everywhere. Now, it seems I'm one of the few who remembers them.

Fishbicycle, a couple more you may remember from southern Ontario radio in those days, although I'm unsure how much exposure they got elsewhere. Still, they'd fit within the topic of this thread:

"Moscow Drug Club," by BB Gabor. IIRC, "Metropolitan Life" was supposed to be the single from Gabor's debut LP and had some success, but the AOR stations picked up on "Moscow" and it took off. A sample lyric: "The party line is just a joke/Comrade, come on in and have a toke...."

"I Don't Wanna Get Drafted," by Frank Zappa, from roughly the same time. A little unusual, since you rarely heard Zappa on the radio, but IIRC, this got a decent amount of airplay, at least in the Toronto market. In those days of increasing Cold War tension, the song sounded like an anti-war tune, until Zappa sings that not only does he not want to be drafted, but he doesn't want his sister to be either because, "I don't want nobody to shoot her in the foxhole."

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 12:03 PM
Oh, man, "Moscow Drug Club" is one of my favorite records, by anybody. I've got the single (with picture sleeve!). My wife was floored by it the first time I played it for her, now it's one of her faves, too. "Smoking Georgian gold, they refuse to do what they are told..."

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
02-15-2007, 12:12 PM
Supposedly some stations changed the line in Jethro Tull's "Locomotive Breath" from "got him by the balls" to "got him by the fun" for airplay.
It wasn't the radio stations that did that; it was Reprise records who pressed up a special DJ single with the word "fun" from the second verse spliced in place of the word "balls" in the third verse.

Similarly, I've heard the Steely Dan song cited by Contrapuntal on the radio with the word "fuck" replaced by a one-beat pause. Since the instrumental track continues without interruption, this must have been a special airplay version prepared by the record company.

Spoke
02-15-2007, 12:17 PM
The Beatles - "Penny Lane"

...four of fish and finger pie...

Don Draper
02-15-2007, 12:17 PM
Lola (http://www.seeklyrics.com/lyrics/Kinks/Lola.html) - the Kinks. I don't have a cite, but I believe this little ditty made it all the way to the #1 slot on 'Billboard.'

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 12:17 PM
I've got a promo by The Stones, of "She's So Cold." On one side, it includes "god damn cold" (the LP version) and on the other side, that bit has been removed by skillful editing.

Exapno Mapcase
02-15-2007, 12:21 PM
On the song " "We Can Be Together," from the 1969 album Volunteers, Grace Slick turns "up against the wall, motherfucker" into a lovely plaintive plea.

jjimm
02-15-2007, 12:22 PM
Not exactly pop, but the closing song for the satirical BBC series Not the Nine O'Clock News was called "Kinda Lingers", sung in a mid-Atlantic accent that swallowed the "d". A very clever piece of censor-busting, as it must have looked merely sentimental on paper.

Exapno Mapcase
02-15-2007, 12:23 PM
Lola (http://www.seeklyrics.com/lyrics/Kinks/Lola.html) - the Kinks. I don't have a cite, but I believe this little ditty made it all the way to the #1 slot on 'Billboard.'
I wish. #9 on Billboard and #2 in the UK.

Jet Jaguar
02-15-2007, 12:30 PM
For that matter, "rocking and rolling" started as a euphemism for sex.

The way you're rockin' and a-rollin'
Can't hear your momma call

That whole song is not-too-subtle double entendre.

I only opened this thread to mention Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock wasn't about dancing...

Sunrazor
02-15-2007, 12:30 PM
I always fantasize that if I were a DJ, I'd do a "Curse Words Weekend" and just play all the songs that have one or two little bad words in them. There are scads of them that get played all the time...Leroy Brown, Dirty Laundry, Rich Girl, Bad Blood, etc.
Um, yeah, that'd probably be one of the shortest careers in radio history, unless you're working for XM or Sirius. We still hold our breaths every time the Sunday afternoon oldies guy plays "Louie Louie," even though we know for certain there really aren't any dirty words in it. Yeah, this stuff gets past the censors (if there really are censors -- I'm not convinced there are) and it's up to the individual statons to decide what to play. That, of course, depends on the audience. We air unsavory lyrics occasionally, but not very often. I think if we tried to do it frequently, the local self-appointed decency police would be knocking on our doors.

Thudlow Boink
02-15-2007, 12:52 PM
Lola (http://www.seeklyrics.com/lyrics/Kinks/Lola.html) - the Kinks. I don't have a cite, but I believe this little ditty made it all the way to the #1 slot on 'Billboard.'Ah, but it was censored! They had to change "Coca-cola" to "cherry cola" to get it played on the BBC.

Their following single, "Apeman," contains the line "The air pollution is a-foggin' up my eyes"—although some listeners claim that what Ray Davies is really singing isn't exactly "foggin'."

Voyager
02-15-2007, 12:58 PM
White Rabbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rabbit_(song)) by Jefferson Airplane snuck drug references by the censors.
You mean snuck by in the same way a tank would sneak past a fast food drive in window?

There are no drug references in there. Every line refers to real stuff in Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. I'm not quite sure what would get censored,. absent a theocratic environment. But who are the censors of which you speak? There are the words you can't say on radio, and after that things were pretty much in the open - especially by the late '60s.

For another example, there is the Robert Johnson line that Led Zeppelin used about squeezing my lemon until the juice runs down my leg. That is way pre-1955, of course.

I assure you no one I knew was giggling about this stuff. And no one in the US really tried to stop it (not in big markets) not that they could, for, to quote Tom Lehrer, "when correctly viewed, everything is lewd."

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
02-15-2007, 01:06 PM
On the song " "We Can Be Together," from the 1969 album Volunteers, Grace Slick turns "up against the wall, motherfucker" into a lovely plaintive plea.
I like the way RCA wouldn't let 'em print the real words on the lyric sheet. Wherever the word "fuck" appears on the album, it's replaced with "fred." As in "cheat, lie, forge, fred, hide and deal," and "Up against the wall fred."

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 01:08 PM
I only opened this thread to mention Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock wasn't about dancing...Were you perhaps intending to mention "Shake, Rattle And Roll"? Haley's version is more about dancing or something nebulous and obscure than Big Joe Turner's original, which was not about dancing AT ALL. "Get outta that bed and wash your face and hands" became "Get out in that kitchen and rattle those pots and pans..."

Spoke
02-15-2007, 01:10 PM
As for drug songs, why bother with veiled references?

Eric Clapton - "Cocaine"

Dung Beetle
02-15-2007, 01:16 PM
Um, yeah, that'd probably be one of the shortest careers in radio history, unless you're working for XM or Sirius.
Well, it's a brief fantasy. :)

saoirse
02-15-2007, 01:20 PM
As for drug songs, why bother with veiled references?

Eric Clapton - "Cocaine"

I heard an interview with Tom Petty where he said that his record company pressured him to bowdlerize the line "You think you're gonna take her away/ With you money and your cocaine." They though champagne would work just as well. At least they said they thought that. I don't believe that a record company executive in the 70s wouldn't know better from firsthand experience.

corkboard
02-15-2007, 01:46 PM
I don't think I've heard the song enough to check & see if it's accurate, but supposedly in Madonna's Open Your Heart, at the end she chants "come on, baby" and "open your heart to me", and the two phrases are overlaid in such a way as to come off sounding like "come on me".

Simon & Garfunkel's Cecilia- which I still hear on the classic rock stations- contains the right-out-there-and-in-your-face line "Makin' love in the afternoon with Cecilia, up in my bedroom... I got up to wash my face..." As a kid I used to listen to my parent's album and think, why would his face be dirty if he was in bed? Didn't get it. Now I do.

cbawlmer
02-15-2007, 01:56 PM
A lot of ZZ Top's songs are openly filthy, like "Tubesteak Boogie" and "Pearl Necklace," but they get tons of airplay.

Ludovic
02-15-2007, 01:59 PM
Simon & Garfunkel's CeciliaSpeaking of which - Late in the Evening's "I went outside and smoked myself a jayyyyyyyyyyyy."

Although I still maintain the next line would be better if he had said "so I went back in and blew that joint away".

An Arky
02-15-2007, 02:02 PM
Back in 1958, I Got A Rocket In My Pocket by Jimmy Lloyd

I didn't come here to listen, so cut the scene
I got a rocket in my pocket and a roll in my jeans
Let's go some place so we can rock a bit
I got a rocket in my pocket and the fuse is lit

Ximenean
02-15-2007, 02:10 PM
The Beatles - "Penny Lane"

...four of fish and finger pie...
That's more likely a reference to the frozen cod delicacy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_fingers) popular in Britain back in the dark ages.

I've always thought that seventies hit "Afternoon Delight" is remarkably rude if you look at the lyrics (http://users.cis.net/sammy/starland.htm) in the cold light of day. "Rubbin' sticks and stones together"?

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 02:18 PM
In one of my Beatles biographies, I think it's Paul who explains that "finger pie" is what they'd call what they did with their girlfriends, riding home late at night on the top level of the double-decker bus. Digital stimulation, as it were. The "four of fish" is food. The other...not so much.

Dung Beetle
02-15-2007, 02:30 PM
I've always thought that seventies hit "Afternoon Delight" is remarkably rude if you look at the lyrics (http://users.cis.net/sammy/starland.htm) in the cold light of day. "Rubbin' sticks and stones together"?
When I was a kid in a private Christian school, they held an assembly to talk to us all about the e-e-evils of rock music, and this was one of the "dirty" songs they spoke of. All of us little grade schoolers were really surprised...we thought it was about skyrockets or something.

Shoeless
02-15-2007, 02:39 PM
For years Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" had the line about "funky shit going down in the city". Now it's "funky kicks".

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
02-15-2007, 02:39 PM
In one of my Beatles biographies, I think it's Paul who explains that "finger pie" is what they'd call what they did with their girlfriends, riding home late at night on the top level of the double-decker bus. Digital stimulation, as it were. The "four of fish" is food. The other...not so much.
Yep, that one's been widely acknowledged. Another one that John Lennon once pointed out is the backing vocals going "tit-tit-tit-tit" on "Girl."

ouryL
02-15-2007, 02:41 PM
White Rabbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Rabbit_(song)) by Jefferson Airplane snuck drug references by the censors.

No, she says Lewis Carroll did that, not her. :D

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 02:52 PM
For years Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" had the line about "funky shit going down in the city". Now it's "funky kicks".They've always existed in tandem. The LP version says "funky shit," the single version says "funky kicks." It doesn't help that they frankensteined a version together with the synthesizer opening of the LP grafted onto the single version, for release on his first Greatest Hits album.

MadTheSwine
02-15-2007, 03:16 PM
Aerosmith's "Walk This Way"

"You ain't seen nothin' 'til you're down on the muffin."

The song references, among other things, having a threesome with his neighbor and her sister and her cousin.

Aerosmith's "Rag Doll"

Rag doll, livin' in a movie
Hot tramp, Daddy's little cutie...

Hot time, get it while it's easy
Don't mind, come on up and see me
Rag Doll, baby won't you do me
Like you done before

Old Tin Lizzie, do it 'til you're dizzy...... etc.

Well, just about every Aerosmith song ever. ;)

The Knack's "My Sharona"

Running down the length of my thighs, Sharona
Never gonna stop, give it up. Such a dirty mind.
Always get it up for the touch
of the younger kind.

The Beatles' "Why Don't We Do It In the Road"

The Beatles' "Don't Let Me Down"

And from the first time that she really done me
Oo she done me, she done me good
I guess nobody ever really done me
Oo she done me, she done me good

Madonna's "Like a Virgin"

And during the bridge of her 1983 hit "Lucky Star" her voice drops really low and sultry and she sings, "Shine your heavenly body tonight." I think we all know where she was going with that one.

Oh, i guess citing Madonna songs is cheating... ;)

I don't see why these should be censored

Exapno Mapcase
02-15-2007, 04:03 PM
I only opened this thread to mention Bill Haley's Rock Around the Clock wasn't about dancing...
Even people who grew up in the 60s weren't aware of most of the history of rock 'n' roll. I know that it was much later that I started doing serious reading about "black' music - once an actual record category, except where it was called "race" music or even "nigger" music - r&b, blues, and all the variations. These records were not played on the radio or sold in mainstream white record stores. You had to live in the black part of town to hear them on the jukeboxes, or go to the live performances. The lyrics were forthrightly about sex, coded or straight. Some of the euphemisms were done for record play, some to get them past local censors, some just because they were funnier, funkier, or more suggestive that way.

There are, literally, whole books about when and what the first rock and roll record was, but everybody agrees that it evolved out of black music in the late 1940s. That's one major reason it was so vilified by adults in the 1950s.

Rock became acceptable when whites started toning down the frank sex of the lyrics and blacks saw how big the white market could be. There are a million stories about famous songs being rewritten to make them playable.

Too much of a good thing is never enough is America's motto, so eventually rock became cretinized and infantilized by the late 1950s. Even so, people then as much as today saw a sexual subtext in everything, no matter how innocent.

I happen to be reading Tim Riley's Fever: How Rock 'n' Roll Transformed Gender in America and he argues that every song that sounded sexual was sexual. I didn't mind when he applies this to early Presley or to Tina Turner, but he takes it too far in places in his girl group chapter.

He can argue until he's blue in the face that "Chapel of Love," by the Dixie Cups (http://www.romantic-lyrics.com/lc6.shtml) is code for "we did it" (as in "we're going to the chapel" means "we went all the way") but I think it's hogwash. You can't hear that song as anything other than "I'm holding out until you put a ring on my finger."

If you want to extend "dirty words" to mere sexual metaphor, you can take your pick of 100,000 songs at any time in rock's history or prehistory. And you can extend it to another 100,000 songs if you decide to interpret black as white, in any of several many ways.

Back to the thread. What about Hoyt Axton's "The Pusher," done by Steppenwolf on their first album?
God damn The Pusher
Gad damn The Pusher
I said God damn, God damn The Pusher man

Steppenwolf also has a song titled "Ball Crusher." Wonder what that's about? :)

gigi
02-15-2007, 04:37 PM
Simon & Garfunkel's Cecilia- which I still hear on the classic rock stations- contains the right-out-there-and-in-your-face line "Makin' love in the afternoon with Cecilia, up in my bedroom... I got up to wash my face..." As a kid I used to listen to my parent's album and think, why would his face be dirty if he was in bed? Didn't get it. Now I do.How many times have I heard that song and only now did I get that?! :smack: Of course I just recently realized that when Springsteen wants to ramrod with his honey till half past dawn, he may not mean just dance around. :o

I think I just decided what it meant as a kid and explored it no further.

gigi
02-15-2007, 04:38 PM
Steppenwolf also has a song titled "Ball Crusher." Wonder what that's about? :)An amazingly strong ping pong player?

CapnPitt
02-15-2007, 04:51 PM
How many times have I heard that song and only now did I get that?! :smack: Of course I just recently realized that when Springsteen wants to ramrod with his honey till half past dawn, he may not mean just dance around. :o

I think I just decided what it meant as a kid and explored it no further.


Don't feel bad about not getting the "Cecilia" reference. I look for stuff like this and I never even thought of it that way until this thread.

As far as "Ramrod," just remember that all songs about cars are really songs about sex. Always.

Spoke
02-15-2007, 04:59 PM
Even people who grew up in the 60s weren't aware of most of the history of rock 'n' roll. I know that it was much later that I started doing serious reading about "black' music - once an actual record category, except where it was called "race" music or even "nigger" music - r&b, blues, and all the variations. These records were not played on the radio or sold in mainstream white record stores.

So-called "race music" was definitely being heard on the airwaves, at least in the South. Nat Williams, a black DJ at WDIA started airing this music in Memphis in the 40s. Cite (http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=M076). Dewey Phillips, a white DJ at a rival station in Memphis started spinning these records in 1950. Cite. (http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/radio/c1.html) That's where all those future rockabillies like Elvis and Carl Perkins picked up the sound.

Intelligently Designed
02-15-2007, 05:41 PM
Rod Stewart's album Blondes Have More Fun has quite a few. Among them, the song Dirty Weekend:

"I'll bring the red wine you bring the ludes
Your mother's doctor must be quite a dude
We'll hang the 'Don't Disturb' outside our door
I'm gonna rock you till your pussy's sore"

Ximenean
02-15-2007, 05:49 PM
In one of my Beatles biographies, I think it's Paul who explains that "finger pie" is what they'd call what they did with their girlfriends, riding home late at night on the top level of the double-decker bus. Digital stimulation, as it were.
Yeah, he's big with the retrospective explanations of song lyrics. He also claims that "Got to Get You Into My Life" is about marijuana, which just makes no sense. Anyway, I bet when he wrote the "fish and finger pie" line he was thinking of the ubiquitous Fish Fingers rather than some memory he claims to have of manually stimulating girlfriends on 1950s Liverpool buses, something so shocking that it would probably have got him deported in those straight-laced times.

Ludovic
02-15-2007, 05:53 PM
As far as "Ramrod," just remember that all songs about cars are really songs about sex. Always.I had figured this out about '50 rock and blues songs. I also knew of this fairly innocent number by the Beatles called "Drive my Car". I never connected the two until a couple years after I learned that classic blues had a major influence on them.

The song is full of double entendres, most of which seem intentional given the Fab Four's grounding in blues. :smack:

Zeldar
02-15-2007, 05:57 PM
So-called "race music" was definitely being heard on the airwaves, at least in the South. Nat Williams, a black DJ at WDIA started airing this music in Memphis in the 40s. Cite (http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=M076). Dewey Phillips, a white DJ at a rival station in Memphis started spinning these records in 1950. Cite. (http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/radio/c1.html) That's where all those future rockabillies like Elvis and Carl Perkins picked up the sound.

Similar radio shows originated in Nashville in the 50's and later. We used to sit out in the gravel pit in our cars and listen to WLAC and hear Hoss Allen and others play R&B stuff. Randy's Record Rack was a big sponsor.

Exapno Mapcase
02-15-2007, 06:53 PM
Sure, some of these records were played on some stations in some locations. And the closer you get to the present the more of them you heard.

But race records go way back in time, long before the late 1940s. And even by the 1960s, the overwhelming majority of white Americans had never heard them. Or even heard of them. Rock music had no written history, and compilation LPs were scarce to nonexistent. Early history was rediscovered very late in the game.

Paul's line about the origin of "finger pie" probably isn't some retro revisionism, though. It goes back a long ways, at least 30 years, and maybe into the 60s. I can't remember when I first heard it, but it was early enough that they still had a "nice" image despite some known drug use.

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 07:02 PM
Another song that was unstoppable, but had to be censored first, was The Knack's "Good Girls Don't." Parts of the vocal were changed for the single: from "wishin' you could get inside her pants" to "wishin' she was givin' you a chance" and "'til she's sittin' on your face" to "'til she puts you in your place." ("and it hurts!")

Spoke
02-15-2007, 08:22 PM
And even by the 1960s, the overwhelming majority of white Americans had never heard them.

How are you defining "race music"? Because the industry used the term to describe R&B. And if you are claiming that an "overwhelming majority of white Americans" hadn't heard R&B by the 60s, well, that's an indefensible statement.

Kilvert's Pagan
02-15-2007, 10:01 PM
And I KNOW Lady Marmalade must be tremendously dirty, but I cant understand most of the words.I remember the first time my dad heard that song - he was driving the car, and almost wrecked it. He was amazed (back then) that they could say Voulez-vous couchez avec moi? on the radio, since it translates as "Would you go to bed with me?".

Talon Karrde
02-15-2007, 10:35 PM
Yeah, he's big with the retrospective explanations of song lyrics. He also claims that "Got to Get You Into My Life" is about marijuana, which just makes no sense. Anyway, I bet when he wrote the "fish and finger pie" line he was thinking of the ubiquitous Fish Fingers rather than some memory he claims to have of manually stimulating girlfriends on 1950s Liverpool buses, something so shocking that it would probably have got him deported in those straight-laced times.
I think Paul has also said that "Got to Get You Into My Life" is about marijuana. I don't have a cite though. Maybe fishbicycle knows...

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 10:37 PM
It was either said in "Anthology", or maybe his book, "Many Years From Now."

Frostillicus
02-15-2007, 10:40 PM
Let's not forget Ted Nugent's Cat Scratch Fever

"Well I make her pussy burn with a stroke of my hand..."

Nope. Nothing dirty there.

Frostillicus
02-15-2007, 10:45 PM
Speaking of The Beatles, I heard that Come Together was John Lennon's fantasy about a group simultaneous orgasm in which he was the recipient, if you will.

"Come together, right now, over me."

fishbicycle
02-15-2007, 10:51 PM
That's new to me. To quote him from the "One To One" concert before they played it, "We're gonna go back in the past just once. You probably remember this one better than I do...I've gotta stop writing these gobbledygook lyrics..."

He was strung out on smack for most of 1969, and had little or no memory of what he'd done then. "Come Together Right Now" was originally conceived as a slogan for Timothy Leary's failed run for office. John promised to write him a song for it. After one thing or another, that idea fell by the wayside, and culminated in possibly the most interesting record they ever made. I've never read anything to suggest what you suggested he was suggesting.

Spice Weasel
02-15-2007, 10:56 PM
I don't see why these should be censored

I guess I don't see how my suggestions are any different from anything else being discussed in this thread?

You're talking to a girl who doesn't believe anything should be censored. ;)

Rico
02-15-2007, 10:59 PM
Chuck Berry's My Ding-A-Ling

From that same album, a minor hit called Reelin' and Rockin'.

It's in the same vein as Rock Around The Clock.

Remember the lyrics:

Looked at my watch and it was quarter past one,
I said "Come on baby, let's have us some fun
...
Looked at my watch it was a quarter past two,
You know, she said she didn't but I know she do!

The last verse went:

We boogied in the kitchen
We boogied in the hall
I got some on my fingers
So I wiped it on the wall!

I could not believe that Los Angeles stations would play that last verse in 1971! Chuck Berry was a nasty little duck-walker!

Diogenes the Cynic
02-15-2007, 10:59 PM
I think the Beatles song "Daytripper" contains the line "She's a prick teaser." I believe it's usually transcribed as "big teaser," but I'm fairly certain I read in some Beatles biography that John was actually saying "prick" in the studio.

Exapno Mapcase
02-15-2007, 11:41 PM
How are you defining "race music"? Because the industry used the term to describe R&B. And if you are claiming that an "overwhelming majority of white Americans" hadn't heard R&B by the 60s, well, that's an indefensible statement.
Nobody had used race music as a genre term for a decade by the 60s. Billboard, among the first, dropped use of the name for its charts of that music as of June 17, 1949 and used r&b instead. By the end of the 50s I don't think anybody was publicly using the term as a genre label.

It's come back since as an overall term for black popular music in the title of a couple of historical books, but race music was its own field for perhaps two or three decades.

It's that late 40s/early 50s music that was, I believe, exclusively black, that is considered the forerunner of rock and roll (and indeed often had those words in their titles) I was referring to. Although some of the names of the people who made it would become better known later, few Hit Parade listeners would have recognized any of them. And would have been scandalized by their music.

Spoke
02-16-2007, 12:06 AM
It's that late 40s/early 50s music that was, I believe, exclusively black, that is considered the forerunner of rock and roll (and indeed often had those words in their titles) I was referring to.

OK, given that definition, I would agree with you that most white folks weren't hearing that music at the time it was produced. However, it was on the radio, and white kids in the South were listening to it.

And that was a problem. White kids started showing up at Little Richard shows. And more to the point, white girls were showing up at Little Richard shows. And ::harumph:: we just can't have white girls watching this gyrating negro and getting ideas. Maybe we can distract them with this nice clean-cut kid, Pat Boone. Here, Pat, try singing "Tutti Frutti (http://www.oldielyrics.com/lyrics/little_richard/tutti_frutti.html)" for us:

Got a gal named Sue
She knows just what to do
She rock me to the east
she rock me to the west

Hmmm. Wait a sec. Better scrub those lyrics a bit. How about:

I've been to the east
I've been to the west

Yeah, that's the ticket! Nice and safe. And Pat, no gyrating.

42fish
02-16-2007, 12:54 AM
And Pat, no gyrating.

It's not like you had to tell Pat not to gyrate. The thought would never pop into his head.

And while I'm here, another lyric that got cleaned up:

'At My Front Door (Crazy Little Mama)' as done by the El-Dorados:
"If you got a little mama and wanna keep her neat
Better keep your little mama off my street"

As done by Pat Boone:
"If you got a little mama and want to get along
Better teach your little mama right from wrong"

Hometownboy
02-16-2007, 03:09 AM
I like the way RCA wouldn't let 'em print the real words on the lyric sheet. Wherever the word "fuck" appears on the album, it's replaced with "fred." As in "cheat, lie, forge, fred, hide and deal," and "Up against the wall fred."

Yep, and when they came to the lyric, "and you do your best to get balled and high,"
RCA bowlderized it to read "and you do your best to get bald and hi."

Seriously pathetic.

Dr. Rieux
02-16-2007, 03:52 AM
I think the Beatles song "Daytripper" contains the line "She's a prick teaser." I believe it's usually transcribed as "big teaser," but I'm fairly certain I read in some Beatles biography that John was actually saying "prick" in the studio.
No, it's definitely "big teaser."
Besides, George Martin never would've gone along with it.

Mangetout
02-16-2007, 04:57 AM
Blondie: Rapture. Debbie Harry stretches out the words "finger fucking" to the point where you can't really tell what she's saying unless you read the lyrics. I was pretty shocked when I learned that, after hearing Rapture played so much.

Vlad/IgorEh? All the online sources* seem to have it as 'finger popping', which also seems confirmed by the rhyme '24-hour shopping' in the next line.

*the only online sources I could find that listed it as fucking were a few sites listing commonly-misheard lyrics.

Ellef
02-16-2007, 04:58 AM
Anyone remember "Telephone Man"? It was a huge hit in the UK in the '70s, and was ostensibly about a visit from the telephone repair man.

"I got it in the bedroom and I got it in the hall,
I got it in the bathroom and he hung it on the wall,
I got it with a buzz and I got it with a ring,
and when he told me what my number was I got a ding-a-ling!"

In those days it went clean over my head. Only dawned on me what it was all about when I heard it again very recently :) .

Malacandra
02-16-2007, 06:39 AM
That's more likely a reference to the frozen cod delicacy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_fingers) popular in Britain back in the dark ages.


I respectfully disagree, given that fish fingers have always been traditionally children's food, and adults would have been eating cod and chips. I've heard the expression "fish and finger pie" as a euphemism for what Americans would call "getting to third base" and I have been and remain convinced that this lyric was knowingly sneaked past the censors.

The final episode of Not The Nine O'Clock News featured a song with the refrain "Kinda Lingers" which was pronounced more and more like "Cunnilingus" as the song went on, intentionally so; and an earlier show had a parody of the Two Ronnies with a song that had the words "Over China-, over China-, over Chinatown" intentionally pronounced like "O vagina, O vagina..." - which was not too unlike what like Barker and Corbett used to do, but a little closer to the knuckle. :D

As an aside, in an episode of Bob the Builder in which Bob accidentally wallpapers himself from eyebrow to toecaps, he can be heard muttering something heavily muffled as he tries to free himself, and if you listen closely it's plain that Morrissey has got away with saying "Oh, fuckin' hell!" on children's TV. Twice. :eek:

wayward
02-16-2007, 07:07 AM
I know that it was much later that I started doing serious reading about "black' music - once an actual record category, except where it was called "race" music or even "nigger" music - r&b, blues, and all the variations.
Of course these days it's just called 'Urban' music, at least here in the UK. It really makes me feel uncomfortable when I see all these black artists with a huge range of styles all lumped together in the same section of the record store.

(Sorry for the tangent)

Exapno Mapcase
02-16-2007, 12:14 PM
OK, given that definition, I would agree with you that most white folks weren't hearing that music at the time it was produced. However, it was on the radio, and white kids in the South were listening to it.
You, plural, keep pushing the time line. Tutti Frutti wasn't released until 1955, which is a full generation in kid time later than the period I'm referring to. You might hear Little Richard in 1955. You were less likely to in 1951 when he started recording.

And the very first deejay who is credited with putting "race music" on a large station was Hunter Hancock in L.A. in 1948, although WDIA in Memphis went to an all-black format the same year (and received bomb threats for doing so). But that was a full two years after Billboard started its "race music" charts.

It's not very good for chronology, but try Marc Fisher's Something in the Air: Radio, Rock, and the Revolution That Shaped a Generation for early rock radio history.

Spoke
02-16-2007, 01:19 PM
You, plural, keep pushing the time line. Tutti Frutti wasn't released until 1955, which is a full generation in kid time later than the period I'm referring to. You might hear Little Richard in 1955. You were less likely to in 1951 when he started recording.

You seem confused about my post. Here my timeline, to clarify for you:

1. Mid-to-late 1940s: Black musicians start performing what executives first called "race music" but which would soon be known as R&B and/or Rock and Roll.

2. Late 40s: Television enters the entertainment world. Radio panics, thinking the end is near, and a lot of radio stations are sold off at bargain prices and purchased by independent owners. These independent radio stations begin to experiment with new formats.

3. 1948: Black DJ Nat Williams goes on the air at WDIA in Memphis and starts playing prototypical Rock and Roll by black artists.

4. 1950: Dewey Phillips (a white DJ in Memphis) begins playing these "race records" to an audience consisting largely of white teenagers.

5. 1951: Little Richard begins recording for Peacock Records.

6. 1952: Little Richard begins performing in clubs.

7. 1950-54: Independent radio stations across the South, such as WLAC in Nashville, sense the growing popularity of Rock and Roll and begin playing these black artists.

8. 1950-54: White kids listening to black artists on the radio begin to absorb the musical vibe. White kids like Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Eddie Cochran, Buddy Holly. White kids begin to show up at performances by these black artists.

9. 1953: Elvis shows up at Sun Records, and pays to record a demo. Chuck Berry begins performing at The Cosmo in East St. Louis.

10. 1954: Elvis records "That's All Right Mama," an Arthur Crudup song. Elvis is the artist Sun Records owner Sam Phillips has been seeking, one capable of bringing the black sound to a wider white audience.

11. 1955: Little Richard records "Tutti Frutti." Chuck Berry begins recording for Chess Records. Fats Domino records "Ain't That a Shame." Bo Diddly records "Bo Diddly." Little Richard's growing popularity with white kids is especially worrisome to white parents because of Little Richard's sexually-charged lyrics.

12. 1955: Record executives, sensing the irresistable force of rock and roll, but wanting to present it in a form more palatable to white parents, start making "safe" covers of the best Rock and Roll songs with whitebread artists like Pat Boone.



I hope that clears things up for you Exapno. The main point I am making, in response to your original post, is that "race music"/R&B/Rock'n'Roll was being played on the radio beginning in the 40s (at least in the South). White kids were being exposed to it. They were absorbing it. They would soon regurgitate it in the form of rockabilly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockabilly) and in the person of Elvis Presley.

gigi
02-16-2007, 01:27 PM
I think the Beatles song "Daytripper" contains the line "She's a prick teaser." I believe it's usually transcribed as "big teaser," but I'm fairly certain I read in some Beatles biography that John was actually saying "prick" in the studio.
I thought the repeat at the end of "Baby You're a Rich Man" becomes "Baby you're a rich fag Jew" in "honor" of their manager.

Gangster Octopus
02-16-2007, 01:38 PM
What's New Pussycat?

Pussycat, Pussycat
You're delicious
And if my wishes
Can all come true
I'll soon be kissing your sweet little pussycat lips!

corkboard
02-16-2007, 01:51 PM
I heard this on a mix CD this morning, and thought it was a good one for this thread- the Pretenders' Tattooed Love Boys contains this passage, although I don't know how much airplay it actually got:

A good time was guaranteed for one and all
the tattoos did target practice in the hall
while waiting for their number to get called out
I, I, I, I found out what the wait was about
I was a good time, yeah, i got pretty good
at changing tyres upstairs bro
I shot my mouth off and you showed me what that hole was for
Chrissy's painting herself as quite the good-time girl there.

Exapno Mapcase
02-16-2007, 05:31 PM
I hope that clears things up for you Exapno. The main point I am making, in response to your original post, is that "race music"/R&B/Rock'n'Roll was being played on the radio beginning in the 40s (at least in the South). White kids were being exposed to it. They were absorbing it. They would soon regurgitate it in the form of rockabilly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockabilly) and in the person of Elvis Presley.
Your chronology is exactly mine with more detail through in.

However, the point I seem not to have emphasized enough is that this music didn't come out of nowhere in 1948. It had been around for decades. Black music with explicit sexual or drug references had been part of jazz, soul, blues, and other forms since WWI (and probably a few existed earlier.) You pretty much need to be an expert collector to find these records, although some compilations exist. Think of "Minnie the Moocher," which is from 1930 although based one earlier songs.

She messed around with a bloke named Smokey; She loved him though he was kokey.
He took her down to Chinatown and showed her how to kick the gong around.

When Groucho makes a prostitute joke about Minnie in Night at the Opera, he was referring to one of the extended, not-played-on-radio versions. The song was like a good joke: you could add as many verses as the audience would take.

Lots of nightclub music was of this sort. Very little of it, even the cleaner versions, got played on the radio. Almost all of it was "race music."

White kids did not grow up listening to this stuff, except for the few who snuck off to the black part of town. (They became musicians themselves, lots of the time.) It was impossible before WWII.

After the war, the world changed. I've made this point before in history threads: there is a huge and critical break in popular culture after WWII. Life after WWI was premodern; life after WWII was modern. We can identify with it in a way that we cannot with the prewar world: those earlier times seem like a Walker Evans photograph, or a Keystone Kops flic. 1948 is very late in this game. It had been played for decades by that point.

Even so, the change - even then - was slow and mild and localized until after Bill Haley broke in 1954.

So while I agree with you about the late 40s and after - I said it all before you did - I don't care very much about them. I'm referring to a generation preceding it. The hippies didn't invent sex and drug and rock 'n' roll. The Jazz Generation didn't either, but they put it into their music first.

zelie zelerton
02-16-2007, 05:39 PM
As an aside, in an episode of Bob the Builder in which Bob accidentally wallpapers himself from eyebrow to toecaps, he can be heard muttering something heavily muffled as he tries to free himself, and if you listen closely it's plain that Morrissey has got away with saying "Oh, fuckin' hell!" on children's TV. Twice. :eek:

Cite!

Or at least tell me the name of the episode so I can go and buy it. :D

Lemur866
02-16-2007, 06:36 PM
"Well I make her pussy burn with a stroke of my hand..."
Nope. Nothing dirty there.

"I can make a pussy PURR with a stroke of my hand"

That's called a double-entendre, son. Well, and entendre and a half.

Would you believe an entendre and a quarter?

Millit the Frail
02-16-2007, 07:55 PM
Not pre-1985, but I just recently realized that "Peaches" by the Presidents of the United States of America is a filthy, filthy song.

"Movin' to the country, gonna eat a lot of peaches...."

gigi
02-16-2007, 07:59 PM
What about "I really love your peaches, wanna shake your tree"?

Spoke
02-16-2007, 08:18 PM
What about "I really love your peaches, wanna shake your tree"?

Yeah, that phrasing has a long history, going back to old blues songs.

Mr. Nuggets
02-16-2007, 08:44 PM
The Beatles - "Penny Lane"

...four of fish and finger pie...

I see your Penny Lane and raise you I am the Walrus. "Crabalocker fishwife pornographic priestess boy you've been a naughty girl you've let your knickers down".

Mister Rik
02-16-2007, 09:39 PM
Heh heh heh heh!

Yummy, Yummy, Yummy.
I got love in my tummy,
And I feel like a-lovin you:
Love, you're such a sweet thing,
Good enough to eat thing
And that's just a-what I'm gonna do.
Ooh love, to hold ya,
Ooh love, to kiss ya,
Ooh love, I love it so.
Ooh love, you're sweeter,
Sweeter than sugar.
Ooh love, I wont let you go.

I've always been surprised that The Eagles' Life in the Fast Lane wasn't censored for the line:

"We been up and down this highway, haven't seen a god-damned thing."

And at the risk of sounding completely dense, I will confess that I just realized a couple weeks ago that that song is all about snorting cocaine.

I still think it's hilarious that the Kid Rock/Sheryl Crow song "Picture" was played uncensored on the classic rock station and the country station, but that the word "cocaine" was blanked out when it was played on the Top 40 station. Actually, it was even more amusing that they blanked out "cocaine" but not "whiskey".

The Scrivener
02-16-2007, 09:43 PM
I heard this on a mix CD this morning, and thought it was a good one for this thread- the Pretenders' Tattooed Love Boys contains this passage, although I don't know how much airplay it actually got:

Damn, I was going to mention that one! I don't know if it got any mainstream radio play either, but a year or two ago it was prominently featured in a commercial. A voiceover explains that the elderly [antiques?] store proprietor you're seeing has an odd, secret habit: every day he has to listen to The Pretenders' "Tattooed Love Boys"... but the commercial doesn't use that snippet of the song.

Martha Medea
02-17-2007, 10:37 AM
Time, by David Bowie, from Aladdin Sane, especially the second verse:

Time - He flexes like a whore
Falls wanking to the floor
His trick is you and me, boy

and:

It's not the side effects of the cocaine
I'm thinking that it must be love

from Station to Station

also, the Rolling Stones' Honky Tonk Women

I met a gin soaked bar-room queen in Memphis,
She tried to take me upstairs for a ride

For all I know they were censored - I wasn't around at the time. The one do I remember hearing about having been banned from UK radio was "Let's spend the night together" on the strength of the title alone.

As for Beatles drug references - there were suggestions that A Little "Help" from my Friends was H as in heroin, as well as the infamous LSD from Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.

HeyHomie
02-17-2007, 10:44 AM
Relax,
Don't do it,
When you wanna come.

by Frankie Goes to Hollywood (I believe this is pre-1985).

The 80's had their share of innocuous little songs about masturbation (She-Bop, Turning Japanese, Blister in the Sun*), but this little ditty was about ejaculation. How this made it to the radio in the Reagan era I'll never know. Maybe we were just too innocent.

*There's debate about whether BitS and TJ are actually about masturbation. Either way, the intent seems to be there.

betenoir
02-17-2007, 01:42 PM
Did I miss it or has no one mentioned "Whole Lotta Shaking Going On"? Or Jerry Lee Lewis in general? He was at least as bad as Little Richard.

Great balls of fire!

Martha Medea
02-17-2007, 02:58 PM
Relax,
Don't do it,
When you wanna come.

by Frankie Goes to Hollywood (I believe this is pre-1985).

Only just, and it was banned by the BBC.

The 80's had their share of innocuous little songs about masturbation (She-Bop, Turning Japanese, Blister in the Sun*), but this little ditty was about ejaculation. How this made it to the radio in the Reagan era I'll never know. Maybe we were just too innocent.

*There's debate about whether BitS and TJ are actually about masturbation. Either way, the intent seems to be there.

Hasn't anyone mentioned Teenage Kicks?

Spoke
02-17-2007, 03:46 PM
Did I miss it or has no one mentioned "Whole Lotta Shaking Going On"? Or Jerry Lee Lewis in general? He was at least as bad as Little Richard.

Great balls of fire!

Plus, he wasn't afraid to cover some of the bawdier R&B songs. Like "Big Legged Woman," featuring such lyrics as:

You got somethin up under there, baby
That'll make a bulldog howl like a hound

and

I bet my bottom dollar
There ain't a cherry in this house

Of course, "Big Legged Woman" didn't get airplay, but it was a helluva song to record at the time.

mamboman
02-17-2007, 05:43 PM
Hank Williams' seminal "Move it on Over" is widely thought to be about ole Hank tryin' to get his leg over during Miss Audrey's "delicate time" and the alternative remedies Miss Audrey may have been prevailed upon to provide.

mm

Spoke
02-17-2007, 05:58 PM
Hank Williams' seminal "Move it on Over" is widely thought to be about ole Hank tryin' to get his leg over during Miss Audrey's "delicate time" and the alternative remedies Miss Audrey may have been prevailed upon to provide.

That seems like an awfully big stretch to me. Hank wasn't one for hidden symbolism in his lyrics. In fact, I can't think of any of his songs that feature any such clever metaphors. They're all pretty straightforward.

I can see how you could interpret the song the way you're talking about, but I don't think Hank intended it that way. It's just a straight-up song about coming home late and having to spend the night in the doghouse because Hank's wife wouldn't let him in. (Being "in the doghouse" in this manner was a common enough concept in that era.)

Horatio Hellpop
02-17-2007, 06:22 PM
To quote Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer), "Some people don't know this, but 'bitch' actually means 'a female dog.' "

Seems odd that radios are actually more skittish today about "dirty words" than they were in the late 70s/early 80s, but they are. Charlie Daniels' "The Devil Went Down to Georgia" contains the lyric ""Cuz I told you once, you sonofabitch, I'm the best that's ever been!" This played intact on the DC-area radio stations when the song originally came out. Today it's the AM version on the FM stations: "I told you once, you son of a gun..." From roughly the same time period, Steve Forbert's "Romeo's Song " ("Been shoveling shit for so long..", 1980) and John Cougar Mellencamp's "Play Guitar" ("Forget all about that macho shit and learn how to play guitar," 1983); these last two don't get much airplay today.

Really, context is everything.

mikeargo
02-17-2007, 08:51 PM
Were you perhaps intending to mention "Shake, Rattle And Roll"? Haley's version is more about dancing or something nebulous and obscure than Big Joe Turner's original, which was not about dancing AT ALL. "Get outta that bed and wash your face and hands" became "Get out in that kitchen and rattle those pots and pans..."

Hey, later on in the song he sings, "I'm like a one-eyed cat, peepin' in a seafood store..." Only the cool kids knew that the "one-eyed cat" was his dick and the "seafood store" was, well, you know...

Valgard
02-17-2007, 10:01 PM
A lot of ZZ Top's songs are openly filthy, like "Tubesteak Boogie" and "Pearl Necklace," but they get tons of airplay.

Double-entendre, there's no actual dirty words in them. Dirty songs, definitely, although they have claimed (tongue in cheek) that Tubesteak Boogie refers to surfing and Pearl Necklace is just about accessorizing.

Uh huh.

However "Legs" has the line "...shit, I got to have them, the girl is all right..."

"Hot For Teacher" off Van Halen's album "1984" opens with the spoken words:

"Hey man, what do you think the teacher's gonna look like this year?" and immediately, in the background, you can hear someone saying "Butt fuck!"

Both of those got lots of airplay, unedited as I recall.

Dire Straits' "Money For Nuthin" was pretty controversial because of the repeated use of the word "faggot" which I think did get played on the air.

Prince's "Darling Nikki" opens with "I met her in a hotel lobby, masturbating with a magazine".

Wee Bairn
02-19-2007, 09:47 AM
Steve Forbert's "Romeo's Song " ("Been shoveling shit for so long..", 1980)


Krokodil, if you're still around, can you advise where that line should be in the song? I used to love that song, but don't remember anything close to that. Was it an extra verse on the album version? Thanks.

cbawlmer
02-19-2007, 01:35 PM
Double-entendre, there's no actual dirty words in them. Dirty songs, definitely, although they have claimed (tongue in cheek) that Tubesteak Boogie refers to surfing and Pearl Necklace is just about accessorizing.


They can claim that all they want, but "Pearl Necklace" includes the lyrics:

That's not jewelry I'm talking about
It really don't cost that much.

It's not just specific obscentities that could get a song censored. If they said "I'm going to ejaculate on your breats," it wouldn't technically contain any dirty words, but would still be fairly surprising to hear on the radio.

Zakalwe
02-19-2007, 01:37 PM
Prince's "Darling Nikki" opens with "I met her in a hotel lobby, masturbating with a magazine".Have you *ever* heard that song played uncensored on regular over-the-air radio though?

cbawlmer
02-19-2007, 01:45 PM
Have you *ever* heard that song played uncensored on regular over-the-air radio though?

I've heard it quite a few times, and again when the Foo Fighters did a great cover of it a few years back.

want2know
02-19-2007, 02:41 PM
From Little T & A by the Rolling Stones :

"Her tits, her ass got soul, baby"

And one I've brought up before: Stay Awhile by The Bells (http://www.oldielyrics.com/lyrics/the_bells/stay_awhile.html). Very daring content for top 40 radio in the early 70s.

And I always chuckled at the Peter Frampton title, I'm In You . Yeah, I know its probably metaphorical, but still a great double entendre.

Zakalwe
02-19-2007, 05:11 PM
I've heard it quite a few times, and again when the Foo Fighters did a great cover of it a few years back.So all since 1985 (per the OP)?

cbawlmer
02-19-2007, 05:25 PM
So all since 1985 (per the OP)?

Hey, you said ever. :p

I can't personally testify that I heard "Darling Nikki" on the radio prior to 1985 since I was about 8 then. It was not a single, but gained a lot of notoriety when Tipper Gore flipped out about how dirty it was. I do remember hearing later in the '80s on Houston radio when I was a little older and listening to popular music. They may have played it later at night, but I'm pretty sure I heard it then.

Horatio Hellpop
02-19-2007, 09:56 PM
Krokodil, if you're still around, can you advise where that line should be in the song? I used to love that song, but don't remember anything close to that. Was it an extra verse on the album version? Thanks.

Bairn, for a song I remember so vividly even though I haven't heard it in over 25 years, I was pretty sure about that lyric (I even got the title of the song wrong; it's Romeo's Tune"). I can't back the claim up from anything online, and while I was somewhat aware of two albums of his back in the day, that's the only single I can even remember the name of.

Evidently, I was mistaken and I withdraw the claim.

chaoticbear
02-20-2007, 01:32 AM
I ask this as I listen to Everlast's "What its Like" with the word "whore" safely edited out. WTF?

Don't forget about the word "green" edited out.

Malacandra
02-20-2007, 04:47 AM
Cite!

Or at least tell me the name of the episode so I can go and buy it. :D

Not sure. It was an early-series episode, but we don't watch Bob as much as we used to as both boys are utterly Star Wars obsessed now. When it's not SW, Scooby Doo and Winnie the Pooh are getting the major airtime these days, and dear old Bob, not to mention Rosie & Jim, is gathering dust in the corner.

Martini Enfield
02-20-2007, 07:41 AM
I've always thought that seventies hit "Afternoon Delight" is remarkably rude if you look at the lyrics (http://users.cis.net/sammy/starland.htm) in the cold light of day.

To quote Ron Burgundy: "This song is about afternoon lovemaking!" :D

BurnMeUp
02-21-2007, 01:24 PM
How about the Pretender's Tattooed Love Boys, if I remember correctly one of the lines is:

"I shot my mouth off
And in an upstarirs room
You showed me what that hole is for"

corkboard
02-21-2007, 03:50 PM
Or something along those lines. (Psst- hey BurnMeUp- see post #90.)

corkboard
02-21-2007, 03:50 PM
..

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