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Baffle
04-27-2007, 01:00 AM
Frequently and for no reason, my PC speaker will sound a trilling noise of random length. It seems to be caused by one of two things: either the use of my mouse's scroll wheel, or watching something which combines sound and video. It doesn't matter what program I'm using to watch the movie, or what I'm scrolling through; it can happen any time I'm doing this.

I've muted the PC speaker in my volume control, and when that didn't work I've disabled the system speaker in my device manager. The sound is still there. Unfortunately as my motherboard is an ECS RS-480M, the PC speaker is soldered into the board itself and is not removable. I have been tempted to gouge out the speaker anyway, but before I do that I wonder if there are any potential solutions to this problem which I may have missed.

MattBrown
04-27-2007, 01:41 AM
Can you disable your speaker in the BIOS? Usually when you boot the computer, it has a note that your can press a key combination to get to "Setup" or something similar. That's what I mean by BIOS. If no note appears, try Delete (Del) or F2. You will know if you find it. Then look for something in the menus that will disable the speaker.

While you are in the BIOS Setup, you can also try looking for a setting like "PNP OS installed" or something similar and changing the setting. Try that first if you see the setting, but if not, try to find and disable the speaker.

drachillix
04-27-2007, 02:29 AM
Frequently and for no reason, my PC speaker will sound a trilling noise of random length. It seems to be caused by one of two things: either the use of my mouse's scroll wheel, or watching something which combines sound and video. It doesn't matter what program I'm using to watch the movie, or what I'm scrolling through; it can happen any time I'm doing this.

Is your cell phone near the pc? Many weird speaker noises are bleedover from a nearby cell phone checking in.

Baffle
04-27-2007, 03:06 AM
I've heard weird speaker cellphone noises, they are pretty rare. (Once a day instead of once every thirty seconds when a movie's playing.) Really more of a 'bip bip bip' sound than a constant trill, and when I turn off my cell phone, I can still get it to make the sound.

Baffle
04-27-2007, 03:21 AM
I also just went into my CMOS/BIOS setup, there's no option to disable the speaker in there. While I was in there, though, the speaker was trilling continuously.

MattBrown
04-27-2007, 06:00 PM
Does it happen in Windows Safe Mode?
Can you update your mouse driver?
How about video card driver?

I once had a computer which made noises from the speaker when I was in the BIOS or whenever the CPU got hot, even if it wasn't above the limit. I had to turn off the temperature warning in the BIOS to get rid of it. That doesn't sound like it's your problem since your problem occurs when you use the mouse wheel, but it's probably worth a shot.

Quartz
04-28-2007, 03:22 AM
This may actually be due to your graphics card complaining about a lack of power.

Baffle
04-28-2007, 08:19 PM
I don't have a graphics card; I have on-board video.

Is there any down-side to gouging out the speaker with a knife?

DevNull
04-29-2007, 03:15 AM
My first thoughts were also the cell phone and the power supply but I would like to add the sound of a Samsung hard drive to the mix here. It trills. It trills then it dies.

Good word... trill. If a Samsung (or ten) ever spazzed and failed you then you all may know the distinct noise.

Put some pressure on the metal in the speaker hole to make sure it really is the speaker next time it trills. I have gouged out those piezo speakers on my car before with no problem, BTW. The trick is to focus on the plate in the speaker without harming the board beneath.

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