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View Full Version : Stephen King's 1408: Will it suck?


norinew
06-03-2007, 04:57 PM
I'm excited about Stephen King's 1408. For my money, it was one of his three scariest short stories I've ever read (and I've read quite a few), and the scariest one from the Everything's Eventual collection.

The movie (http://imdb.com/title/tt0450385/) is due out June 22nd, and unless the reviews thoroughly pan it, I'll be there. I've looked at the photos on IMDB, and even some of the photos scared me. I like John Cusack pretty well. I like Samuel L. Jackson, too, but totally would not have pictured him as the hotel manager.

So, what do y'all think? Will it suck, or is there hope?

Qadgop the Mercotan
06-03-2007, 05:40 PM
So, what do y'all think? Will it suck, or is there hope?
King stories turned into movies are pretty iffy. Some have sucked bigtime (It, Maximum Overdrive), some have been fantastic (Green Mile, Stand by Me, Shawshank Redemption).

Looking at the director/screenwriter credits, I'm not super hopeful. Maybe they'll pull it off.

It was a good story.

moonstarssun
06-03-2007, 05:48 PM
In the trailer it looks like they added backstory that includes a dead daughter making him want to find out if ghosts are real, blah blah blah. That kind of annoys me. But I'm keeping my fingers x'd and will probably go see it.

ivylass
06-03-2007, 06:00 PM
I'm surprised they made this one into a movie. To me, there wasn't much of a story...Man checks into "haunted" hotel room, against the wishes of the hotel manager, sees some scary stuff, gets rescued just in time. The End.

I would really like to see Everything's Eventual (the story, not the whole book) made into a movie. That one has some serious potential.

Leaper
06-03-2007, 07:02 PM
ivylass: That's what I was thinking. I'm assuming from the short story, and from the commercials I've seen, that they'll fill in some of the time by (spoilers juuuust in case) seriously punching up the surreality of the whole experience - give him all sorts of new and freaky hallucinations and stuff... maybe take him into it more slowly, since the whole use of rapidly sliding narrative to show him going over the edge won't work as well.

As for the dead daughter... Didn't he have a dead brother in the story? Not that the brother was indicated as being a major reason for anything, but I seem to remember him having that.

norinew
06-03-2007, 08:02 PM
Didn't he have a dead brother in the story?
He did. One of the disturbing parts of the story was where he said into his recorder "My brother was killed by wolves on the side of the freeway" (or something like that; I'm going on memory here). Maybe they did the dead daughter instead of dead brother because they felt they needed a female or two in the movie?

I would really like to see Everything's Eventual (the story, not the whole book) made into a movie. That one has some serious potential.
I agree. I could also see In The Deathroom as a movie.

moonstarssun
06-03-2007, 08:16 PM
Yep, dead brother. And the "killed by wolves" quote is correct. I wondered if it was a little link to The Stand.

I've noticed that in many movies they feel compelled to add a dead child/spouse to explain the protagonist's passion for whatever he or she is pursuing. It always bothers me. Why does there always have to be some gut-wrenching explanation?

norinew
06-03-2007, 09:02 PM
Yep, dead brother. And the "killed by wolves" quote is correct. I wondered if it was a little link to The Stand.
I've wondered, too, if it was a little nod to The Stand (which is my all-time favorite Stephen King book, with the possible exception of The Talisman.

Unauthorized Cinnamon
06-04-2007, 06:27 AM
I've noticed that in many movies they feel compelled to add a dead child/spouse to explain the protagonist's passion for whatever he or she is pursuing. It always bothers me. Why does there always have to be some gut-wrenching explanation?I'm with you all the way. I adore this story, but I'm skeptical it can be made into a good movie, since the subjective experience is so key. To read about him seeing these things is scary, but I worry that the audience seeing these things will be lame, if you know what I mean.

And I hate the dead kid angle. After all, some of the fun of the story comes from him being a jaded hack who is able to turn out his books because he has zero belief in the supernatural, so camping out in "haunted" places is no big deal. If it turns out he's on a quest to find evidence of life after death, that kind of ruins it for me.

Oh, but I'm so going to see it anyway. I hope they have someone really talented do the phone voice: "This is nine! Nine! This is ten! Ten! We have killed your friends! Every friend is now dead! This is six! Six!" *Shiver*

Dung Beetle
06-04-2007, 06:52 AM
I predict suck.

Dunderman
06-04-2007, 06:57 AM
I predict suck.Same here. I can't see how that story could possibly be made into a good movie.

norinew
06-04-2007, 07:00 AM
I hope they have someone really talented do the phone voice: "This is nine! Nine! This is ten! Ten! We have killed your friends! Every friend is now dead! This is six! Six!" *Shiver*
Oh, my! I hope it's someone good, too!

Scumpup
06-04-2007, 07:50 AM
Suck.

Dolores Reborn
06-04-2007, 08:10 AM
I predict suck, too, but I'll be watching it...

moonstarssun
06-04-2007, 09:17 AM
The voice on the phone was the most disturbing part of that story, IMO. It kept me awake at night just imagining it. If they nail it in the movie it'll be totally worth the price of the ticket.

ivylass
06-04-2007, 12:00 PM
I agree. I could also see In The Deathroom as a movie.

Refresh me on the plot on that one? Is that the one with the dying mother?

I think the one with the toy chimp with the cymbals (you know the one I mean) would be good for a TV movie. Anyone know if TNT is doing Nightmares and Dreamscapes again this summer?

toadbriar
06-04-2007, 12:03 PM
I recall this story was included in the audio collection Blood and Smoke. The telephone voice was pretty much perfect in that version. I am excited about this movie, I think I heard a whisper about it a long while ago but forgot. John Cusack in a Stephen King story - I'm delighted! Did you ever feel like the universe was catering entirely to you?

MovieMogul
06-04-2007, 12:03 PM
John Cusack, incredibly gifted as he is, has an uncanny ability to pick incredibly crappy material when it comes to mainstream Hollywood films: America's Sweethearts, Must Love Dogs, Serendipity, Runaway Jury, Con Air. It seems like he is so on-the-margins, that he has no instinct when it comes to what he thinks a broader audience might like.

I vote for Suck.

norinew
06-04-2007, 12:16 PM
Refresh me on the plot on that one? Is that the one with the dying mother?
No. In The Deathroom is about an American newspaper reporter in Mexico. He's been helping some Mexicans who are rebelling against the government, and has some valuable information about a coming attack. 98% of the story takes place in a room where he is being questioned.

It's very much a story about the human psyche, and heroism. I think it could be a very good movie.

miss elizabeth
06-04-2007, 12:34 PM
The story lends itself wonderfully to an audio reading (and there is one, and I've heard it's wonderful), but I think a movie will be the suck. There's not enough there to sustain a movie, and adding more ruins it; the whole point it that it happened quickly and was scary as shit. A glimpse into hell.

I think a movie made of Everythings Eventual (the short story) would be wonderful, if done well. There's enough going on there to easily flesh it out into a movie. But I'm really disappointed they picked 1408 for this. The story is so terrific and scary; they are going to ruin it.

Poysyn
06-04-2007, 12:39 PM
I think it will be tough to show the occurences in the room and make them as scary as they were in the story - a lot of the mood setting is that the room is "off" how can you show that?

I wish they had done either "The Man in the Black Suit", or that ganster one, with the lassoed flies - that one would be good too, not scary but good.

norinew
06-04-2007, 01:06 PM
that ganster one, with the lassoed flies - that one would be good too, not scary but good.
The Death of Jack Hamilton. Great story. My favorite non-horror story from the collection.

Cat Fight
06-04-2007, 01:38 PM
If the movie's half as scary as the trailer (http://youtube.com/watch?v=gKqPlIFokig), it'll be pretty damn good.

ivylass
06-04-2007, 02:39 PM
No. In The Deathroom is about an American newspaper reporter in Mexico. He's been helping some Mexicans who are rebelling against the government, and has some valuable information about a coming attack. 98% of the story takes place in a room where he is being questioned.

It's very much a story about the human psyche, and heroism. I think it could be a very good movie.

Oh, yes...that was a good one.

Dolan's Cadillac would be a good one too. Also one about the Old Man's Club...the mysterious one with the rooms that go on forever and the butler who never seems to age.

Moirai
06-04-2007, 02:39 PM
CRAP! I just watched that trailer (at work, no less) and have got a serious case of the willies.

Cusack is my all-time favorite actor.

Unauthorized Cinnamon
06-04-2007, 03:00 PM
They were going to make "Dolan's Cadillac" with Kevin Bacon and (blurg) Sylvester Stallone, but it never went anywhere. Personally, I think Paul Giamatti would be fantastic as the protagonist if they ever decide to actually make it into a movie.

FWIW, there's a post at Rotten Tomatoes by someone claiming to have seen an advance screening of 1408 and giving it high marks, but who knows if they have any taste.

elfkin477
06-04-2007, 06:34 PM
Considering the story was more or less pointless, I predict the movie will suck.

No, wait, I just watched the trailer. That has very little resemblence to the story, so maybe the fact that the source is so lackluster will have no bearing on how good or bad the movie is.

Ivylass, the one with the dying mother is Riding the Bullet. They made it into a movie about a year and a half ago. It's not too bad.

BoBettie
06-04-2007, 09:38 PM
I have to say- if you loved this short story, get it on Audiobook and listen. HOLY creepy. I've listened to it 3 times and each time I'm left creeped out like you would not believe. I think the movie will be good, personally.

I would LOVE to see Quitters, Inc as a movie.

moonstarssun
06-04-2007, 09:41 PM
I have the version of the audiobook that has King reading it. When he's doing the voice on the phone I just want to crawl under the blankets and hide. Made me afraid to pick up the phone for a week.

Good stuff.

Leaper
06-04-2007, 09:58 PM
I would LOVE to see Quitters, Inc as a movie.

Did you not like the treatment in Cat's Eye?

norinew
06-05-2007, 07:44 AM
I have the version of the audiobook that has King reading it. When he's doing the voice on the phone I just want to crawl under the blankets and hide. Made me afraid to pick up the phone for a week.

Good stuff.
I haven't heard the audio book of this, but I can tell you that for months (no, I'm not exaggerating) after reading the story for the first time, the "automated read-back" voices on phones would give me the heebie-jeebies. (You know the ones I'm talking about; you dial the gas company, and they ask you to enter your 18 digit account number, and then "auto-read" it back to you: "You have entered ONE zero ONE eight TWO. . .") ::shudder::

ivylass
06-05-2007, 11:37 AM
Ivylass, the one with the dying mother is Riding the Bullet. They made it into a movie about a year and a half ago. It's not too bad.

No, there's another one, about a man going to visit his dying mother in the hospital and he deliberately gives her an overdose of pills in an assisted suicide

norinew
06-05-2007, 12:43 PM
No, there's another one, about a man going to visit his dying mother in the hospital and he deliberately gives her an overdose of pills in an assisted suicide
Ah. The Woman In The Room. That was either in the Night Shift collection, or Skeleton Crew.

Dung Beetle
06-05-2007, 12:55 PM
There was a film made of The Woman in The Room; it was paired with The Boogeyman. I rented it once so long ago I really couldn't tell you much about it.

TLDRIDKJKLOLFTW
06-05-2007, 07:38 PM
I think it's one of King's most legitimately scary stories (up there with The Reaper's Image), and agree that a good 95% of the story's effect is that it's related in a "documentary" style a la House of Leaves ("At this point, there's a burst of distortion on the tape and then thirty seconds of silence before it resumes.")

In typical Hollywood fashion, it looks like they're going to "jazz it up" with wacky monsters and ghosts and stuff jumping all over the place. :rolleyes:

Cat Fight
06-05-2007, 10:20 PM
In typical Hollywood fashion, it looks like they're going to "jazz it up" with wacky monsters and ghosts and stuff jumping all over the place. :rolleyes:

Yeah, I'm a little wary of the daughter being turned into a creepy little Ring-style ghost. Wasn't that b&w guy going out the window scary enough? (That part really did give me the chills)

Unauthorized Cinnamon
06-06-2007, 07:29 AM
Listened to Blood & Smoke, then watched the TV trailer last night, and I decided, yes, this will suck. They're trying to add way too much. A ghost jumping out the window, winter inside the room, "the police are in 1408, and it's EMPTY!"

Half of the story consists of Olin talking about the room - compelling in the story, but they won't do it in the movie, and I have doubts that Jackson (though I love him) could pull it off. The other half of the story relies on the perfect presentation of weirdness. How can a movie replicate the menu and the plum, the eldritch feeling of the bed's comforter, or the seasick feeling upon looking at the crooked door?

Also, I be they won't have the picture of the woman with the bleeding nipples (cause that's just too shocking!), and she is awesomely weird and frightening.

MovieMogul
06-18-2007, 02:38 PM
Actually, it looks like it may not suck. (http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/archives/2007/06/1408_serves_it.php)

:crosses fingers:

Dung Beetle
06-18-2007, 02:42 PM
I'm listening to the audiobook version right now, and I just don't see how this can be made into a movie. There must be a lot of added material.

norinew
06-18-2007, 03:51 PM
Actually, it looks like it may not suck. (http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/archives/2007/06/1408_serves_it.php)

:crosses fingers:
My fingers are crossed, too. Unfortunately, I'm having some surgery this Friday, so I doubt I'll be up to any movie-going this weekend. However, the following weekend, unless this movie scores less than 15% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes, I am so there.

randwill
06-18-2007, 04:32 PM
Over at RottenTomatoes the kids are always trying to predict what the quality rating of new releases will be, both by consumers and critics. This, to me, seems like a real waste of time. (Unlike most activity on the internet.) With over fifty years of movie-going under my belt, I have never been able to tell if a movie is gonna' be any good or not by watching the trailer or looking at the poster or even reading the book it's based on. Critics' consensus is a very good indication to me, but ultimately, sitting there and watching it is about the only way to be sure one way or the other.

gonzomax
06-18-2007, 05:00 PM
Ebert and Roeper gave it 2 thumbs up yesterday. Quite enthusiastically, I might add.

norinew
06-18-2007, 05:50 PM
Ebert and Roeper gave it 2 thumbs up yesterday. Quite enthusiastically, I might add.
:cool:

I'm definitely going, then. I've already told my hubby. Usually, we compromise on the movies we see. I told him he would not have a choice with this one. He doesn't hate King's work, but doesn't like it nearly as much as me. And he's not big on horror movies. But he's got to go, dammit, so I'll have someone's arm to grab!

toadbriar
06-18-2007, 07:53 PM
I was slightly dismayed not to see any mention of this film on stephenking.com. My hopes are buoyed by the good reviews, though. Looks like Mr Toadbriar and I are going on a date!

thwartme
06-22-2007, 11:47 PM
Just got back from seeing the film ...

I never read the story - I've read only a few of King's - so I can't speak as to the translation from page to screen. The movie I saw, while certainly not an instant classic, is a solidly creepy little film.

Cusack gives a nicely progressing performance. You can see the tension and fear build in him. There are a few 'gotcha' moments of jump-out-and-say-boo type scares, but most of the horror is more subtle.

I won't go into spoilers or anything too specific. I'll just say that the film is IMHO worth $10.00. Or, in my case, $8.95 Canadian.

thwartme

norinew
06-23-2007, 08:00 AM
Well, it's running at 75% fresh on rottentomatoes.com, so that's pretty darned good. I don't know if I'll be feeling up to seeing it this weekend, having just had some minor surgery yesterday, but next weekend for sure.

toadbriar
06-23-2007, 12:19 PM
Saw it last night. I had read, and love, the original story - one of King's best, or at least one of my favorites.

It preserves what I thought needed to be preserved from the story, and I do not feel cheated of the money we spent - it was creepy, especially for the PG-13 rating.

norinew
06-23-2007, 04:22 PM
Saw it last night. I had read, and love, the original story - one of King's best, or at least one of my favorites.

It preserves what I thought needed to be preserved from the story, and I do not feel cheated of the money we spent - it was creepy, especially for the PG-13 rating.
We just saw it, and I agree with this. It even creeped out my hubby, and he doesn't "do" horror. Light on the blood and gore, and heavy on the creep.

Unauthorized Cinnamon
06-23-2007, 07:58 PM
Just saw it, and I thought it was pretty good. Not fantastic, but definitely good. I feel like the creepiness seriously suffered as they approached the climax - too much action, I guess, but still it was pretty effective.

I do wish they'd lingered a bit more on the paintings - I think there may even have been a third version of The Hunt which only got a quick pan-by in the background, and it's pretty clear that the artists put a lot into the paintings, yet they are shown so briefly. Ditto on the phone - liked the transition of the voice, could have done with a bit more.

On the other hand, the trip along the ledge, all the way through the "You are here" sign were great - very nice addition. I also liked the use of the "I've been drugged" suspicion to naturally bring down the tension, so it could slowly build again.

Leaper
06-23-2007, 08:14 PM
The last post's spoilered comments made me think about the original story, and I realized something:

In the short story, Enslin never really stood a chance. He was never given the opportunity to really question his surroundings or his thoughts or whatever. IIRC, he shakes his head, tells himself to get a hold of himself because he's rambling, and that's it. He's sucked right in, and he doesn't have a prayer. From the spoilered part above, it seems that in the film, Enslin at least makes a token attempt to stick to his guns and his sanity and try to explain what he sees. Necessary because of the length considerations, but I think it's also more realistic.

For some reason, I thought the webcam I saw in the ads was a nice additional touch, not only to share to readers how easily "supernatural" events can be punctured, but also as additional marketing for his books. :)

Qadgop the Mercotan
06-23-2007, 09:00 PM
Just got back from seeing it. I liked the short story a lot, and enjoyed the movie quite a bit, too. Especially the ending.

Mrs. Mercotan was not as taken with it as I, but says it was "OK".

I won't be buying the DVD or anything, however.

RogueRacer
06-25-2007, 11:11 AM
RogueGF and I saw this Friday night. I thought it was somewhere between ok and good. Based on some things she had heard and the ratings I saw at Rotten Tomatoes I made the following prediction before the movie:

"This will probably be good in a creepy and suspenseful sort of way, but it will be one of those movies that fail to have a payoff at the end."

I'm not sure that I was completely right, but I can't say that I think I was wrong either. I asked RogueGF what she thought happened at the end. Her reply was, "the writer ran out of ideas."

So, with that in mind, I'm curious, how did the short story end and how did everyone interpret the movie ending?

Was Enslin out of the room? Was the room using Enslin or maybe even possessing him to get his wife too? The look on his face after the recording of his daughter's voice played was definitely a little odd.

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
06-25-2007, 11:32 AM
The wife and I saw it yesterday, and we were disappointed. Especially considering that she very rarely agrees to go see scary movies as they tend to really freak her out. Needless to say, she was not freaked out at all, and I certainly didn't get any thrills or chills out of it.

Neither of us had read the story, so I'm willing to give it a go in the hopes that the film was just another lacking adaptation of King's work.

The scene on the ledge was totally predictable, and was the end of any hope that I had that the movie would be at all decent. The incorporation of the paintings was totally arbitrary, had no context, and contributed nothing to either the story or the suspense. Context was also lacking (or forgettable, which is just as bad) with the hammer/axe wielding person/vision, as well as with the desicated corpse hanging out in the heating duct. Both seemed like they were afterthoughts thrown in as a desperate attempt to at least startle the audience a couple of times.

vibrotronica
06-25-2007, 11:44 AM
I saw it on Saturday and liked it. Cusak made it, in my opinion. He was the only real character in the movie, and pretty much just mugged for the camera for about a third of the 90-minute run time. It seemed to have much more thought put in to it than most horror and suspense movies these day, even though in the big picture that means it was about the level of a middling Twilight Zone episode.

But I had fun, didn't feel ripped off and will recommend it to my friends. ***

Lightnin'
06-25-2007, 12:36 PM
I thought it was... okay. The inclusion of the daughter storyline didn't bug me as much as I thought it would.

I was a little irritated that the paintings didn't play a bigger part- by the time they got around to changing, there was too much going on to really see what they were doing. I thought that In the Mouth of Madness did a much better job with a painting changing over time.

I was also a bit disappointed with the Phone Voice. It was a hell of a lot creepier when I was reading the book.

I'm hoping that the movie adaptation of The Mist will be better.

RogueRacer
06-25-2007, 12:54 PM
Context was also lacking (or forgettable, which is just as bad) with the hammer/axe wielding person/vision, as well as with the desicated corpse hanging out in the heating duct.My first thought with the guy in the heating duct was, oh, that's for the video game adaptation.

Unauthorized Cinnamon
06-25-2007, 01:10 PM
So, with that in mind, I'm curious, how did the short story end and how did everyone interpret the movie ending?FWIW, I read in a review that the end was one of several possibilities, and it was picked on the basis of test audience reactions. Not the most encouraging scenario - but it wasn't too bad all in all.

In the storythere is no real physical problem with getting out of the room. The problem is the effect it's having on his mind. Enslin has to do something to "short-circuit" the mind games the room is playing, so he sets his shirt on fire, staggers out the door, and is fortuitously extinguished by a passing guest with a bucket of ice.

As for my interpretation, I think he's out. There are objective indications that he went to the hotel, and that he left it, such as Olin congratulating him from afar, and him having the tape. But as he plays the daughter's voice, there is a truly weird look on his face. I thought it might mean that perhaps he was contemplating doing what his daughter is talking about on the tape, i.e., that they can all be back together. Not in some heartwarming spiritual way, but in a way involving a messy murder/suicide, which would be right in line with the effect the room has had on its occupants. Maybe I was just in a dark mood, though. It could be merely his grim satisfaction at proving what happened to him wasn't a hallucination.

scotandrsn
06-25-2007, 01:18 PM
Gave up on King about 15 years ago, but saw the movie this weekend.

Best of its kind since Poltergeist, IMO.

Iggins
06-25-2007, 04:53 PM
My $0.02 - I thought it was a genuinely creepy movie for about the first 80%. At some point it stopped being as unsettling. I'm not sure why - maybe it became a bit too bombastic?

I liked that things were not explained, and you we're just shown these terrifying images and scenarios.

I thought that the writing was excellent, with some very funny parts, to go along with the scares.

RikWriter
06-25-2007, 05:13 PM
I saw the movie with my wife this last Saturday and we both enjoyed it quite a bit. I am a big John Cusack fan and he made the movie for me. I found it genuinely creepy, and I was very happy to see a good horror movie that didn't involve buckets of blood and idiotic teenagers.

Cat Whisperer
06-25-2007, 05:35 PM
I'm not sure about seeing the movie - "1408" is, for me, a truly creepy story that really gets inside my head, and I don't know about seeing a movie like that. Of course, the movie might be easier to take than the book, since all the scary stuff in the book is provided by my own mind to start with.

treis
06-25-2007, 10:05 PM
I thought it was a pretty good movie. There were some odd boogie men that just jumped out at you, but overall it was just incredibly freaky. When the...

Clock reset and the music started playing again and again that freaked me out. What freaked me out even more was when the guy across the street just mimicked what Cusack was doing.

Definitely worth seeing, but probably not a classic.

Hampshire
06-26-2007, 09:43 AM
I'm sorry but this movie really sucked. I didn't even go in with high expectations expecting a good creepy moody thriller like The Shining or The Others and would have been happy if it was just a decent popcorn horror flick. It wasn't.
Creepy? please.
If you were creeped out when Bill Murray's clock radio came on for a second day in a row playing "I got you babe" well then I guess you creep out pretty easily.
There were a few nice jump out of your seat moments when a ghost slasher popped in suddenly to say hello a few times but other than that I guess a room that gets hot then cold, shakes, cracks, a dumps water on you with a lot of special effects is supposed to be scary.
A less is more approach in the fright department would have been nice.
And as far as stories go there really wasn't one. He had some daddy issue that they never addressed or resolved. mmm, okay? Same with the daughter.

I don't even think I could recommend it on DVD.

Little Plastic Ninja
06-26-2007, 10:38 AM
Mild spoilers below. Consider yourself warned. Apart from what I put in the box they really don't seem big enough to really, well, spoil anything.





I admit I mostly have bad taste in horror (I loved Ghost Ship. And I thought House on Haunted Hill was seriously creepy. In my defense, I also loved Into the Mouth of Madness).

Still, I found 1408 decidedly creepy. I really liked it, probably because I love haunted-house style horror where the protagonist(s) are trapped in a room/house/boat/etc and cannot escape. The first part of the movie is integral to making the rest of this happen -- it puts the audience in a very very normal place. We know, logically, that horrible creepy things are going to happen. But John Cusack is the audience: he doesn't seriously believe in ghosts and ghouls and the like. He's seen a lot of this.

See, I've stayed in 'haunted' hotels. I even worked in a purportedly haunted bed and breakfast. I've never had anything seriously inexplicable happen, just like Enslin. The radio? Justifiable -- that'd be an easy trick to do for someone with electronics knowledge. The chocolates and the folded toilet paper? Someone got in and out silently. There's just a secret panel or something. That window is just old. The hallucinations are just from drugged alcohol...

...but eventually it becomes completely impossible to believe that this is as simple as a hallucination. The fact that there's no reason, no resolution, is particularly chilling. There's no ghost to put to rest or secret incantation to mutter. The only way out is to die, and even that probably just ties you to the room forever to harass new people. The only way out -- assuming Enslin got out -- is to get the door opened from the outside.

The guy creeping through the ducts, incidentally, looked a lot like the first guy who died in there. Did you see the round specs? Alternately he's just someone who crawled into the ducts to die.


As for the daddy issue...


It seemed apparent to me. Enslin did not have the best relationship with his father. The old ghostly bastard seemed pretty creepy and was agreed upon to be a big ol' dick by everyone who read the (obviously autobiographical) first book Enslin wrote. When the guy got old and infirm, Enslin packed him off to a shitty-ass nursing home where the guy barely ever saw sunlight or anything but the four walls of his sterile room. Enslin felt guilt about this mixed with the bitterness he had toward the old man.

No, none of this is actually stated. It's more implied.

RandMcnally
06-26-2007, 02:10 PM
It seemed apparent to me. Enslin did not have the best relationship with his father. The old ghostly bastard seemed pretty creepy and was agreed upon to be a big ol' dick by everyone who read the (obviously autobiographical) first book Enslin wrote. When the guy got old and infirm, Enslin packed him off to a shitty-ass nursing home where the guy barely ever saw sunlight or anything but the four walls of his sterile room. Enslin felt guilt about this mixed with the bitterness he had toward the old man.

I loved when the father said, "As you are I once was, as I am you will be." It reminded me of an old painting from the middle ages that had a group of young nobles find three caskets. One freshly dead, the other decomposing, and the third a skeleton. They say that line I mentioned above and it really freaked out the nobles because they are so beautiful and rich etc, and the thought that no matter what they did they would be like what they saw was disturbing. Or something. I'm a dork.

Beadalin
06-26-2007, 02:54 PM
So how does the movie handle the creepy repeated numbers on the phone? I gots to know.

Nikki Tikki Tavi
06-26-2007, 06:19 PM
So how does the movie handle the creepy repeated numbers on the phone? I gots to know.


It wasn't as creepy as I hoped it would be, and the voice didn't do the whole list of numbers. I was also disappointed that they didn't have the painting with the woman on the stairs.

Overall, I thought it was alright. I could have done without the dead daughter storyline, but I guess they had to flesh out his character somehow. I didn't buy SLJ as Olin, he seemed aggressive, not polished and courteous.

Not disappointed I saw it, could have waited for the rental.

Typo Negative
07-03-2007, 07:18 PM
What I did not enjoy: The gaggle of teeny bippers that infested the theatre and would not keep quiet.

What I did enjoy: Just about everything else. Cusak is one my favorites. I loved the bit of him trying to get the attention of the guy across the street.

What I thought was unique it had a body count of zero. there were no deaths in the present time of the film. all the deaths were in the past....and none were actually shown dying. and it was still scary.

Hamlet
09-26-2007, 07:51 PM
I know I'm a couple months behind, but I finally saw this at the dollar theater here. I'm a big King fan, and I liked, but didn't love the story. But I really, really liked the movie. I thought it was better than the book.

I loved the fact that it was much more about what would drive a person to commit suicide than BOO!!!!! look out behind you. I found the movie to have a fantastic balance between startling the audience, creeping out the audience, and character development. I loved the addition of the daughter, as well as the less emphasis on the spooky paintings and bizarre happenings.

Cusack did a fantastic job in the movie, the twists were great I especially liked the time when he "escaped" the room and was in the restaurant with his wife. The parallels with Misery were a great touch, and sold me on the belief that he had escaped, only to be dragged back in, and I liked the ending too.

In case you couldn't figure it out, I really liked this movie.

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