PDA

View Full Version : Shopping Carts in NZ and Australia


Hooleehootoo
09-13-2007, 04:30 PM
I believe the object Americans call a shopping cart is called a "trolley" in Australian grocery stores. I thought they called it by a third name in New Zealand, but I can't remember. What is it?

Otara
09-13-2007, 04:54 PM
I believe the object Americans call a shopping cart is called a "trolley" in Australian grocery stores. I thought they called it by a third name in New Zealand, but I can't remember. What is it?

Im from NZ and remember it as shopping trolley but I havent lived there since 92, might be a new words turned up or the memory is getting hazy.

Otara

Cunctator
09-13-2007, 05:10 PM
It was definitely a shopping trolley when I lived in New Zealand.

j_sum1
09-13-2007, 05:32 PM
Shopping trolley in NZ.
Ditto in Oz.

But Kiwis are pretty multilingual and will understand American idiom. We get enough of your TV shows.

But what I really want to know is why in Oz (where I presently live) they insist on having four steerable castors on all shopping trolleys. In NZ, the front two steer and the back two are fixed. The result is that the trolley goes in the direction that you point it and doesn't slide sideways. You don't wrench your back when you turn it around a corner. You can move it out of the way of other shoppers -- it doesn't career diagonally down the aisle. You can drive it across the carpark on a slight slope without it running away from you. And if one wheel is wonky, then it still behaves in a semi-manageable manner. [/personal rant]

brad_d
09-13-2007, 05:45 PM
I was at an IKEA recently (the one in Costa Mesa, California), and they had four-wheel-steerable carts there, too. I noticed the same issues you did - it was a good deal more effort to steer around.

Two wheel steering on shopping carts (NZ-style, apparently) is far more common around here - that's why the IKEA cart stood out in my mind.

jastu
09-13-2007, 06:19 PM
When I was in NZ, trolleys were called trundlers at some supermarkets.

Suda
09-13-2007, 10:39 PM
But what I really want to know is why in Oz (where I presently live) they insist on having four steerable castors on all shopping trolleys.

This is the only type I've had exposure to, but I like them and I think it makes a lot of sense. The aisles can get pretty cramped sometimes and you've got all that extra manoeuvrability to just go directly sideways to get around someone.

And its great taking little kids shopping at least - my nephew loves spinning around in circles on the spot, and I find myself 'drifting' around corners. Yes I suppose that does help make your point that its not useful. Oh well.

Siam Sam
09-13-2007, 10:45 PM
Say, do shopping carts or trolleys Down Under veer off in the opposite direction from what they do in the Northern Hemisphere?

maggenpye
09-14-2007, 01:45 AM
Say, do shopping carts or trolleys Down Under veer off in the opposite direction from what they do in the Northern Hemisphere?
Yes, it's the only way they can keep hitting the driver's door.

But what I really want to know is why in Oz (where I presently live) they insist on having four steerable castors on all shopping trolleys.

When I read this I thought all four wheel went in the same direction instead of my usual; three wheels forward, one spinning aimlessly a millimetre off the ground or stuck facing left.

Dottygumdrop
09-14-2007, 02:04 AM
Woolworths in Australia originally called their shopping trolleys "gliders" (back in the 50's, I think, when they first started using them).

Merkwurdigliebe
09-14-2007, 02:17 AM
This is the way they are in many places in Europe too, and I never understood that either. It's surprising to me too. I prefer the setup where only two wheels are steering

Cicero
09-14-2007, 03:22 AM
I'm with Maggenpye- I can never find a shopping trilley that goes in the direction I want.

Mangetout
09-14-2007, 04:24 AM
They're sometimes called 'baskets' here in the UK* - even the big ones. I believe the industry sometimes refers to them as bascarts (sp?)

*(I do realise that's outside the proper scope of the question, but we do sometimes share terminology with antipodeans)

MarcusF
09-14-2007, 06:44 AM
Originally posted by Mangetout:
They're sometimes called 'baskets' here in the UK* - even the big ones. :confused: Not in any supermarket I've been in. There are big trolleys and little trolleys but a basket is a basket that you carry - no wheels! Just try queuing up at the "Baskets Only" checkout with a trolley and see what happens :D

On the two or four castors question all the supermarket trolleys in the UK have four. Large trolleys in DIY stores sometimes only have two.

si_blakely
09-14-2007, 07:03 AM
Shopping trolley in NZ.
Ditto in Oz.

But Kiwis are pretty multilingual and will understand American idiom. We get enough of your TV shows.

But what I really want to know is why in Oz (where I presently live) they insist on having four steerable castors on all shopping trolleys. In NZ, the front two steer and the back two are fixed. The result is that the trolley goes in the direction that you point it and doesn't slide sideways. You don't wrench your back when you turn it around a corner. You can move it out of the way of other shoppers -- it doesn't career diagonally down the aisle. You can drive it across the carpark on a slight slope without it running away from you. And if one wheel is wonky, then it still behaves in a semi-manageable manner. [/personal rant]It takes skill to drift a fully laden four-wheel turning trolley round the aisles at speed - you need to do a little anti flick first to start the rotational inertia, then power round with the back end - like a rally car. Heaps more fun :D
They're sometimes called 'baskets' here in the UK* - even the big ones. I believe the industry sometimes refers to them as bascarts (sp?)

*(I do realise that's outside the proper scope of the question, but we do sometimes share terminology with antipodeans)
NZers wouldn't call a trolley a basket, we reserve that word for people from the UK... ;)

Si

Mangetout
09-14-2007, 07:19 AM
:confused: Not in any supermarket I've been in. There are big trolleys and little trolleys but a basket is a basket that you carry - no wheels! Just try queuing up at the "Baskets Only" checkout with a trolley and see what happens :DI didn't mean to imply that it was official or even common, but I've come across the usage - occasionally, but often enough to believe it isn't just an idiosyncrasy of one or two people - that's all.

TheLoadedDog
09-14-2007, 07:33 AM
Say, do shopping carts or trolleys Down Under veer off in the opposite direction from what they do in the Northern Hemisphere?

Dunno, but the aisles must be full of Americans. No bastard keeps left.

Harmonious Discord
09-14-2007, 07:51 AM
The carts in Wisconsin wobble side to side as you push them down the shopping isle. I thought for years this was so you have mixed chocolate milk when you left the store. Paint in the cans was well blended too. Now I've decided it's because we are on the 45th parallel and the carts oscillate between the north pole and the equator. By the way look up Poniatowski, Wisconsin. As you can see, we have the best attractions of the U.S.A. in Wisconsin. (http://www.mnmuseumofthems.org/45th/Poniatowski.html) ;) At this exact spot shopping carts will spin in circles on one back wheel. :eek:

Richard Pearse
09-14-2007, 09:10 AM
Can't stand trolley's that won't go straight. I've been known to keep taking them back till I get a decent one.

Hooleehootoo
09-14-2007, 11:55 AM
When I was in NZ, trolleys were called trundlers at some supermarkets.
I think this was what I heard. In case there is something regional to it, I was in Auckland, and a Coles in Hamilton.

I too noted that Australian carts have rear wheels that pivot.

In Hamilton, they had 20 kg sacks of coal for $9 NZ. I took a picture, since this is not a common item in US supermarkets.

John Mace
09-14-2007, 12:14 PM
I'm surprised no one has linked to the wikipedia article on shopping carts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shopping_cart):

A shopping cart (also called a trolley in British and Australian English; sometimes referred to as a carriage or shopping carriage in the U.S. region of New England; also known as a bascart in some regions of the U.S., basket in others, and buggy in Parts of B.C, and the American South.) is a cart supplied by a shop, especially a supermarket, for use by customers inside the shop for transport of merchandise to the check-out counter during shopping, and often to the customer's car after paying as well. Often, customers are allowed to leave the carts in the parking lot, and store personnel return the carts to the shop.

Emphasis added. I have to say, though, that I'm from New England and I've never heard "shopping carriage" used.

lightingtool
09-14-2007, 02:35 PM
I have to say, though, that I'm from New England and I've never heard "shopping carriage" used.I grew up in southern Connecticut, and that's what I call them. I believe it's a very regional thing, as my wife is from Vermont and had never heard the term before she met me.

UncleRojelio
09-14-2007, 02:48 PM
I don't care what you call them. I have but one rule when it comes to grocery shopping -- The wheels on the cart/trolly/basket/trundler/glider never never never ever come to a complete stop. If I can't sweep what I want off the shelf and into the moving cart, then I didn't really need that item in the first place. If I am moving down the aisle and some moron is standing to one side agonizing over their potential purchase and have left their cart on the other side of the aisle, thereby blocking my progress and threatening my number one rule, then I'll bash their damn cart out of the way.

Darth Nader
09-14-2007, 09:43 PM
So that was you, Uncle Rojelio? Decorum prevents me from using much of the language that I would like to in this forum. I was having a bad day, my son was being fussy, and some total F*CKING ASSHOLE decided that it would be too much trouble to steer around my little personal crisis, and instead ram said shopping cart right into my Achilles tendon. Fuck you ever so much, and you are lucky I'm not as needle-dicked as you, as I let you live. F*cker.

Thanks for doing your part toward making the world a little bit more unhappy. Selfish prick.

whiterabbit
09-14-2007, 09:50 PM
In at least some parts of the American South they're called buggies, just to add yet another name for the things.

levdrakon
09-14-2007, 10:12 PM
You people in NZ & Australia are lucky. All the wheels on your carts move.

Here in the US, there's a law that one of the rear wheels has to be fixed in place and not turn at all, and one of the front wheels has to be permanently fixed turning one way, forcing you to only move in little circles.

Siam Sam
09-15-2007, 07:23 PM
I'm reminded of the inventor of the shopping cart. It made him wealthy, and he retired to Hawaii. After he died, his evil brood would intermittently make the news in their decades-long legal fight for daddy's money. I'd read about it from time to time when we weer living in Hawaii.

Sevastopol
09-15-2007, 08:32 PM
Your real shopper prefers : the last of the V8 interceptors (http://thisdistractedglobe.com/2007/03/31/mad-max-1979/) .

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.