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View Full Version : Skipping a Step While Copying to CD


Frylock
12-21-2007, 01:34 PM
I'm trying to copy all my important stuff onto CD in order to transfer it to my new computer.

This requires that I highlight a bunch of folders or files, tell the computer to "copy" them, tell it to "paste" them onto the CD, and the after it finishes that operation, I must then tell it to actually write the files.

The problem is, after I do the copy-paste operation, I often forget about the subsequent "write" operation. (It takes about five to ten minutes for each copy-paste procedure, so I usually just leave the computer to go do something else while it copies.) This means I waste a bunch of time leaving the computer idle after it's finished the paste but before I remember to tell it to actually write the thing.

So my question is, is there some way I can get the machine to write after it's finished copying, without my having to go in and click "write these files to CD" every time?

-FrL-

thelurkinghorror
12-21-2007, 02:31 PM
You could use an actual burning program, which are numerous. Nero is one. You usually pick which files you want to put on there, and click "burn."

Don't Panic
12-21-2007, 06:04 PM
InfraRecorder (http://infrarecorder.sourceforge.net/) is free and nice.

Will Repair
12-21-2007, 09:39 PM
How's your soldering? (http://www.nullmodem.com/NullModem.htm)

drachillix
12-21-2007, 09:58 PM
How's your soldering? (http://www.nullmodem.com/NullModem.htm)

If you're gonna work that hard for it, just mount the old drive in the new computer.

neutron star
12-21-2007, 11:41 PM
How's your soldering? (http://www.nullmodem.com/NullModem.htm)

:confused:

Was this posted in 1989?

bouv
12-21-2007, 11:46 PM
The reason it does this is so if you make a mistake in what you copy and paste, you can correct it before you burn it to the CD, which unless it's a CD-RW (which nobody uses,) can't be corrected afterward. CD-R's are cheap, but as you said, the process itself can be time consuming and you might not realize the mistake until you go to transfer the files from the CD.

But you really should just look into installing (if just temporarily) the old harddrive into the new PC. Must faster and easier in the long run. or, if you have a router, just send the files over the LAN.

squeegee
12-22-2007, 01:34 AM
how about an ethernet cable between the machines? Share a drive, then drag all the junk you want onto the other machine? Or, hell, use a thumb drive or a usb drive. Or an iPod mounted as a drive.

All of those things start copying stuff immediately, no second step.

bouv
12-22-2007, 02:30 AM
how about an ethernet cable between the machines? Share a drive, then drag all the junk you want onto the other machine? Or, hell, use a thumb drive or a usb drive. Or an iPod mounted as a drive.

You'd need a crossover ethernet cable, not a regular one. But yeah, a flash drive would be easier than burning a whole mess of CD-Rs.

don't ask
12-22-2007, 02:56 AM
Or get a gmail account and send the files to yourself.

ParentalAdvisory
12-22-2007, 03:06 AM
You'd need a crossover ethernet cable, not a regular one. But yeah, a flash drive would be easier than burning a whole mess of CD-Rs.

Even better, transplant the hard disk in the new machine. Copy what you want, and put it back.

Frylock
12-22-2007, 10:15 AM
You'd need a crossover ethernet cable, not a regular one. But yeah, a flash drive would be easier than burning a whole mess of CD-Rs.

Easier, maybe, but more costly, since I already have a ton of blank CDs lying around. (Plus my wife wants to mail all of our family photos and videos (this is the vast majority of what I am copying for the transfer) on CDs to various of her relatives for safekeeping. She is really paranoid about losing them.)

-FrL-

Frylock
12-22-2007, 10:20 AM
Even better, transplant the hard disk in the new machine. Copy what you want, and put it back.

This is what I did last time. But this time, for reasons I guess I don't need to get into, the house is going to be far too crowded with kids, pets and relatives for me to be able to get into the innards of a computer. It would be a disaster waiting to happen.

-FrL-

Frylock
12-22-2007, 10:22 AM
Or get a gmail account and send the files to yourself.

How long would it take to upload and download twenty gigabytes? I have a pretty fast DSL connection (I don't know the details, it's just the connection that came with our apartment).

-FrL-

Frylock
12-22-2007, 10:23 AM
how about an ethernet cable between the machines? Share a drive, then drag all the junk you want onto the other machine? Or, hell, use a thumb drive or a usb drive. Or an iPod mounted as a drive.

All of those things start copying stuff immediately, no second step.

Ethernet cable, huh?

Is that easy?

Is an ethernet cable the same thing as a "networking cable" or a "patch cable?"

-FrL-

essell
12-22-2007, 10:33 AM
How long would it take to upload and download twenty gigabytes? I have a pretty fast DSL connection (I don't know the details, it's just the connection that came with our apartment).

-FrL-
I have a good quality line and it'd take 121 hours to upload 20GB.

CD and Post seems like a much better idea to distribute it.

neutron star
12-22-2007, 11:01 AM
Ethernet cable, huh?

Is that easy?

Is an ethernet cable the same thing as a "networking cable" or a "patch cable?"

-FrL-

Sort of. You'd want what's called a crossover cable. Outwardly, it looks like a normal Ethernet cable (which also goes by the other names you mentioned), but the wires inside the jacket are crossed to allow a direct connection between two computers. Here (http://www.home-network-help.com/crossover.html) is a quick guide for setting the PCs up to do this.

That will be the fastest way to transfer the files without actually opening up the computers. A crossover won't cost you any more than a regular Ethernet cable - about $5-10.

K364
12-22-2007, 11:43 AM
Isn't the most straightforward* method to move the files is to add the new computer to your home network and then share a folder on the old machine - it becomes visible to all machines on your network. In fact, you can probably share the root folder of each drive just so that everything is visible.

This assumes you have a router.

*I realize through many years of painful experience that nothing can be said to straightforward on a computer.

Frylock
12-22-2007, 01:06 PM
This assumes you have a router.


Indeed.

(If I had a router, btw, it seems like it wouldn't have even occured to me to move things using CDs. :confused: )

-FrL-

Frylock
12-22-2007, 10:51 PM
Sort of. You'd want what's called a crossover cable. Outwardly, it looks like a normal Ethernet cable (which also goes by the other names you mentioned), but the wires inside the jacket are crossed to allow a direct connection between two computers. Here (http://www.home-network-help.com/crossover.html) is a quick guide for setting the PCs up to do this.

That will be the fastest way to transfer the files without actually opening up the computers. A crossover won't cost you any more than a regular Ethernet cable - about $5-10.

Is the "network card" probably the same as the one I use to connect my computer to the series of tubes that drops things on my desk? (Apologies for shameful ignorance.)

squeegee
12-22-2007, 10:59 PM
This (http://www.nuggetlab.com/comptia_files/equipment/net_CAT%205%20cable%20with%20RJ-45%20connector.jpg) is what an ethernet cable looks like. The connector looks much a telephone connector, but is wider and has more pins.

Frylock
12-23-2007, 03:25 PM
Okay, I think I have it all figured out. My internet connection is called a "network connection" XP's control panel, so I figure I must, indeed, be using a network card, and so I figure I will, indeed, be able to do this crossover cable thing.

One last question: Does it matter that the two machines will have different versions of windows? (Current == XP, new == Vista)

Oh, also: What about the fact that some of the files on my current computer are in "my documents" folders indexed to particular user accounts? Some of those files accounts are only accessible when one is logged in under the corresponding account, correct? How will that be handled by the network connection?

-FrL-

squeegee
12-23-2007, 04:06 PM
If you log in as administrator, you can see all the user folders. Optionally copy them all to some non-My Documents place on the old machine to consolidate, then copy the whole kaboodle to the new machine. If you want the same user accounts on the new machine, you'll need to make all those accounts, find all the new user folders, and copy all those saved documents into them.

One last question: Does it matter that the two machines will have different versions of windows? (Current == XP, new == Vista)Shouldn't.

squeegee
12-23-2007, 04:11 PM
Just to really scare the crap out of you, here's MS's help page (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/304040) on file sharing. It's not (usually) as bad as it looks, and that page is intimidating because it's far too detailed.

Frylock
12-26-2007, 12:46 AM
Oh wait.

Shoot.

Do both machines need to have monitors in order for me to be able to do this?

Or I guess I could switch a single monitor from one to the other as needed?

-FrL-

neutron star
12-26-2007, 01:07 AM
Do both machines need to have monitors in order for me to be able to do this?

Nope.

Frylock
12-26-2007, 09:40 AM
Nope.

Okay, I'm just trying to figure out how to assign them both IP addresses, but I guess I can do that from a single machine?

I'm sure this will all become clear to me once I've got the actual setup going.

The great thing is, my current computer actually has two LAN cards in it due to a long-ago comedy of errors. So I can probably be online at the same time as I'm trying to get this crossover cable thing going. So I can pester you guys some more. Thanks! :p

-FrL-

pulykamell
12-26-2007, 12:34 PM
Easier, maybe, but more costly, since I already have a ton of blank CDs lying around. (Plus my wife wants to mail all of our family photos and videos (this is the vast majority of what I am copying for the transfer) on CDs to various of her relatives for safekeeping. She is really paranoid about losing them.)

She's not paranoid. She's smart. Your hard drives will fail, it's only a question of when. Then again, not all CDs and DVDs are created equal, and some will fail much earlier than others, with the worse recordable media failing in about 5 years.

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