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Zsofia
03-12-2008, 10:03 PM
This is kind of embarrassing. I've started taking guitar lessons, partly as a resume builder and partly for personal interest. And I'm realizing that I can't hear acoustic guitar in songs. Ever since I started playing Guitar Hero, electric guitar parts have really stood out to my ears (and of course electric guitar is easy to pick out in the first place) but acoustic just somehow fades into the sonic background for me. It's kind of humiliating because I have a ton of music knowledge - decades of piano, college music minor, and I'm trying to pick up an instrument I just can't hear!

I mean, it's obvious when it's that really sing-along-folky Peter Paul and Mary style. And it's obvious when it's classical guitar. Bluegrass I have a hard time telling some of the stringed instruments apart, but I can get the essential drift of the guitar part. But can anybody give me some things to listen for the acoustic guitar that are rock or the other kinds of folk or blues or, you know, stuff like that? What does virtuoso acoustic sound like? Is this a stupid question?

Askance
03-12-2008, 10:11 PM
Starting at or very near the top: Tommy Emmanuel doing Day Tripper and Lady Madonna (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYzajpeAWuA&feature=related), Classical Gas (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX0eTp7SoNU&feature=related), Guitar Boogie (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lbvSBNLLoo&feature=related) and Somewhere Over the Rainbow (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZNJf-h7F8s&feature=related) - watch the finger work at the start of that last one, just amazing.

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
03-12-2008, 10:12 PM
For acoustic, steel-string guitar, your best bet is some of the country/folk influenced rockers -

James Taylor
Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young
Joni Mitchell
Bruce Cockburn
Melissa Etheridge
Don McLean
Bruce Springsteen (Nebraska)

Most rock music uses acoustic for a quieter, mellow passage, then brings out the electric for the heavier section of a song. Led Zepplin - Over the Hills and Far Away is a prime example. I'm sure you'll get lots of great recommendations here.

Mongo Ponton
03-12-2008, 10:43 PM
Every one should own a copy of this regardless.


Friday Night (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friday_Night_in_San_Francisco)

But I think it might be what you're looking for.

Princhester
03-12-2008, 10:45 PM
Your basic problem is that "acoustic guitar", "virtuoso", almost all "rock" and much "blues" do not go together. There are very few, almost none, who play acoustic in rock. When they do it tends to be rhthym guitar which as you say fades into the background. The first answer in this thread gives the name of someone who is freakishly good at playing acoustic and does play rock, but he's an anomaly. Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits plays acoustic at times, but on tracks that are not rock. His "Private Investigations" contains some georgeous acoustic, but it's not really a rock track (his playing on that track is more classical in feel).

Most of those listed by Le Ministre de l'au-delà play acoustic when playing straight up folk, not rock. And none except Bruce Cockburn would I describe as virtuoso (maybe Joni in her weird and wonderful way, and Neil Young perhaps).

There are some superb acoustic blues guitarists but I'm not much into that so I wouldn't know. Eric Clapton's Unplugged album has him playing acoustic of course. I wouldn't say he plays anything outstandingly virtuoso on that album though (which isn't to say it isn't great music).

If you're looking for straight out acoustic guitar virtuosity that isn't classical, it is hard to go past Tommy Emmanuel. Other people can play stuff he does, but I've never seen anyone who can play all of it. I first saw him play in a pub in the late eighties. There aren't too many who can play stunning versions of Mediterranean Sundance, then some Beatles, then Recuerdos De La Alhambra, then La Grange, then Guitar Boogie all in the space of an hour or two.

squeegee
03-12-2008, 10:48 PM
Don Ross (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkidVP0AcQ8) is pretty freaking amazing.

Princhester
03-12-2008, 10:49 PM
I should add that if you want to hear and see some Tommy Emmanuel, you are best off poking around on Youtube. He's a stunning guitarist but IMHO his taste in music sucks. In concert he plays other people's pieces and it's great. His studio albums contain his own compositions which tend towards saccharine dreck.

silenus
03-12-2008, 11:02 PM
Al Di Meola (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Di_Meola)

Mediterranean Sundance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7ypeZ6R-t0), from the Friday Night concert mentioned above.

Eonwe
03-12-2008, 11:16 PM
I've always been impressed with Paul Simon's writing, playing, and arranging on acoustic guitar. His eponymous album, as well as the Simon and Garfunkel album Bookends have some of my favorite guitar playing in them.

Diogenes the Cynic
03-12-2008, 11:16 PM
Led Zeppelin has some really good solo acoustic pieces from Jimmy Page like "Black Mountain Side" and "Bron-Yr-Aur."

I'd also recommend Randy Rhoads'
"Dee" (from Ozzy's Blizzard of Oz album).

Pete Townshend's live acoustic performance from The Secret Policeman's Ball is pretty stellar.

If you really want your mind blown, listen to Robert Johnson's King of the Delta Blues album. It's the best acoustic blues guitar you'll ever hear.

Eonwe
03-12-2008, 11:29 PM
Pete Townshend's live acoustic performance from The Secret Policeman's Ball is pretty stellar.



Townshend also does some awesome acoustic work in Tommy, in the Overture in particular.

flickster
03-12-2008, 11:48 PM
A few Favorites:

Blues
David Bromberg
Ry Cooder

Latin
Jesse Cook
Armik
Ottmar Liebert

Flatpickers
Tony Rice
Doc Watson

Other
Gipsy Kings

octothorpe
03-12-2008, 11:53 PM
For my money, you can't beat Leo Kottke for incredible acoustic guitar. Is it rock? I can't really say and it doesn't really matter (although his rendition of Eight Miles High might be considered such). I have him listed under Genre - Unclassifiable. Pick up The Leo Kottke Anthology (Rhino R2 72585/72438 19111 29) for a little bit of everything.

I agree that Neil Young has some excellent acoustic tracks, but Steven Stills, during his best days, was the better guitarist (listen to Bluebird from Buffalo Springfield Again).

Yeah, DiMeola, McLaughlin, and Paco de Lucia on Friday Night in San Francisco is jaw-dropping, although i'm more partial to Fantasia Suite than Mediterranean Sundance.

Good call Eonwe, Paul Simon is one of the most overlooked acoustic players. I'd forgotten him myself and agree he needs a mention.

#

koeeoaddi
03-13-2008, 12:36 AM
John Fahey (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vQRckvXoJg&feature=related)
John Renbourn (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5C9c0KpTtfo)
Doc Watson (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TILbEd-U3sM) (this is one of the coolest guitar pieces ever!)

Sam Stone
03-13-2008, 12:42 AM
Michael Hedges (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29CMRsWlDt0).

Great acoustic guitarist with a very unique style. Recently passed on.

Loach
03-13-2008, 12:48 AM
Michael Hedges. I would give a youtube link but trust me, just look at a few of them. Ok I'll give you one (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnaEZaUMk-s&feature=related).

Damn missed it by that much. But he didn't die recently. It was 1999.

Oslo Ostragoth
03-13-2008, 12:50 AM
A few Favorites:

Blues
David Bromberg
Ry Cooder

Latin
Jesse Cook
Armik
Ottmar Liebert

Flatpickers
Tony Rice
Doc Watson

Other
Gipsy KingsAn excellent list.

Leo Kottke may be unclassifiable, but I lean toward ungodly guitar-talented "folk". Al DiMiola I consider jazz, but I'm willing to be proven wrong.

jovan
03-13-2008, 01:48 AM
Most rock music uses acoustic for a quieter, mellow passage, then brings out the electric for the heavier section of a song. Led Zepplin - Over the Hills and Far Away is a prime example. I'm sure you'll get lots of great recommendations here.
A famous example of a song that's acoustic and not particularly mellow is Violent Femmes' Blister in the Sun (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGGujZ9V4ic&feature=related).

A really outstanding use of acoustic guitar in a rock song is Robert Fripp's playing on King Crimson's Cirkus (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCg-caiyGRs). Again, not particularly mellow.

Jethro Tull have several very nice acoustic guitar pieces as well. Witche's Promise (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6d2L5-raoIY) is on YouTube, but the best are probably the tracks on Aqualung:
Cheap Day Return, Mother Goose, Wond'ring Aloud, Up to Me and Slipstream.

Mediterranean Sundance has been mentioned already but off the same record, I think Short Tales of the Black Forest (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOVWqhGXVNA) by Di Meola and John McLaughlin is another fine example. It's fusion jazz, so it's a bit closer to rock than the latin Sundance.

Hey, It's That Guy!
03-13-2008, 02:05 AM
Django Reinhardt. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Reinhardt)

si_blakely
03-13-2008, 06:53 AM
Newton Faulkner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton_Faulkner) is worth a listen for some impressive acoustic guitar.

Si

freekalette
03-13-2008, 07:03 AM
Wish You Were Here
Mother
(Pink Floyd)

One of my current faves is Loner, by *looks desperately for the "schwa" key* ekoostik hookah. It's got a jam band vibe, but if you're into that it's a great feel-good song.

Will probably come up with more once I'm all the way awake. My dad's a guitarist.

don't ask
03-13-2008, 07:22 AM
I should add that if you want to hear and see some Tommy Emmanuel, you are best off poking around on Youtube. He's a stunning guitarist but IMHO his taste in music sucks. In concert he plays other people's pieces and it's great. His studio albums contain his own compositions which tend towards saccharine dreck.

I have never liked Emmanuel - I always thought he was the epitome of technique over passion, all his stuff seems lifeless to me. When I started taking lessons last year my teacher was encouraging me and said, "You are a real musician. You love music and you can tell good music from bad music. Don't get caught up worrying about guys like Tommy Emmanuel - he is an instrumentalist. He likes to make guitar playing look good but you can't hum any of it after he is done."

The best guitarist I have ever heard or seen is Tonino Baliardo the lead guitarist for the Gypsy Kings. Check out any footage you can find. He plays the most impossibly complicated stuff and the whole time looks blissed out, as if it requires no effort. Hell, the rest of the band often watch him play.

Lunar Saltlick
03-13-2008, 07:28 AM
I love Kottke, Hedges, Don Ross and Billy McLaughlin, but if you're looking for someone that you, as a beginner, might actually be able to play, try John Fahey. Try to get the album and the book of tab called The Best of John Fahey 1959 - 1977. There are about a dozen old-time, traditional, blues-flavored solo acoustic tunes in that book and on the album. Many of the tunes are hard-driving, syncopated numbers that really aren't too difficult to play. Try Spanish Dance, or In Christ There is No East or West. I learned about half a dozen of Fahey's tunes from this book without too much effort as a beginner/intermediate guitarist.

Take note, however, that Fahey was a weird guy and had wide-ranging interests, especially as he got older. Some of the later stuff is electronic music supplemented by industrial noise. For acoustic, stick to the disc I mentioned above.

don't ask
03-13-2008, 07:40 AM
To save you looking for Tonino check out this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KKXfw2hZVg&feature=related)

RealityChuck
03-13-2008, 07:41 AM
Bert Jansch (http://www.bertjansch.com/)
John Renbourn (http://www.john-renbourn.com/)

Crotalus
03-13-2008, 08:06 AM
Lindsay Buckingham has done some pretty amazing stuff on acoustic guitar.

Dazzling White Diamonds
03-13-2008, 08:29 AM
Andy McKee is a personal favorite of mine. Also agree with Ottmar Liebert, Al Di Meola and Leo Kottke. They're all great.

Princhester
03-13-2008, 08:33 AM
I know what you mean don't ask, Tommy's great fun but I'd rather listen to Joni, long term. But I can still get great enjoyment out of his technical ability and who are any of us to say what's good and bad music? The humming comment is frankly silly: you can't hum anything complex, doesn't mean it isn't good music.

jjimm
03-13-2008, 08:34 AM
Leo Kottke - another vote. He's astonishing. And for Joni, in her early albums.

In addition to John Renbourn, from the same stable there's Richard Thompson - check out this live performance of Vincent Black Lightning (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azB7B8hrVZY).

And for me Nick Drake is up there - not the most technically accomplished guitarist, but a very innovative picking style, unusual tunings, and a haunting sound.

In the modern era, José González (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4_4abCWw-w) is the only person I've ever heard who has stepped into Nick Drake's shoes.

All the above have some great live stuff on YouTube. Except Nick Drake, he being dead for thirty years. :(

Shoeless
03-13-2008, 09:26 AM
In addition to John Renbourn, from the same stable there's Richard Thompson - check out this live performance of Vincent Black Lightning (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azB7B8hrVZY).

Having just seen yet another Richard Thompson solo acoustic show last night, I whole-heartedly concur. That guy is just frickin' amazing.

Zsofia
03-13-2008, 10:17 AM
Wow, keep 'em coming! This is an awesome syllabus of stuff to listen to to get a feel for what the instrument does in a variety of styles.

fessie
03-13-2008, 10:21 AM
You might also enjoy Milwaukeean Willy Porter. Not famous, but highly praised. He posts tabs on his website.

flickster
03-13-2008, 10:26 AM
A few more I should have included on my earlier list:


Kelly Joe Phelps

Paul Geremia

Keb Mo

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
03-13-2008, 11:45 AM
Adding a couple more ideas - someone's already mentioned Django Reinhardt. Frank Vignola does some great Gypsy playing. Tico, tico (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bo9vX7kZeb4) FV warming up backstage (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQnn7FWKO-A)
You may wish to check out some of the early Dick McDonough/Carl Kress recordings. Or there's the soundtrack to 'The Sweet and Lowdown". I hated the movie, but the soundtrack features Howard Alden and Bucky Pizzarelli just having way too much fun.

This is a different kind of steel-string guitar, but Bob Brozman is a master of all things resophonic, and he (literally) has re-written the book on the history and style on these instruments. BB song #1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vX--sM5G52U) I wish I could shimmy like my sister Kate (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGhpWjbcvVA)

Have fun

McDeath_the_Mad
03-13-2008, 12:07 PM
Give Tim Reynolds a listen to.

He tours with Dave Matthews on a fairly regular basis. There is one track on the 2-Disc Live at Luther College set that is mind boggling.

The track is called "Stream". You can actually here it at the DMB Discography (http://www.davematthews.com/discography/) page.

Every track on that 2 disc set is really good, I highly recommend it.

MtM

dalej42
03-13-2008, 12:17 PM
I'm far from an expert in guitar, but I've always been impressed with Steve Hackett.

Doctor Who
03-13-2008, 12:27 PM
The best guitarist I have ever heard or seen is Tonino Baliardo the lead guitarist for the Gypsy Kings. Check out any footage you can find. He plays the most impossibly complicated stuff and the whole time looks blissed out, as if it requires no effort. Hell, the rest of the band often watch him play.
No shit. I was at a little bar one night when some no-name band was scheduled to play. As I was standing outside, I started to hear the best fucking guitar playing I had ever heard live. I ran inside to see what was happening. Turns out it was a few of the guys from the Gipsy Kings (including Tonino) playing an impromptu set under an assumed band name. (They had a big show at a gigantic amphitheater the next night). I just stood there and watched in amazement for two hours.

Gangster Octopus
03-13-2008, 12:27 PM
Charo (http://youtube.com/watch?v=0KZv8l0lKmk) and no, I am not kidding.

Chefguy
03-13-2008, 12:32 PM
You can't mention Al DiMeola without mentioning Paco De Lucia, who was his partner on the Elegant Gypsy album. I've seen them both in concert and they are phenomenal. For premier classical Spanish playing, try The Romeros (http://www.romeroguitarquartet.com/) (turn your sound on), who I've also seen. The patriarch of the family was the author of the famous piece Granada, which is a staple for anybody playing Spanish guitar.

GargoyleWB
03-13-2008, 12:38 PM
I'll submit, for your evaluation, Roy Harper. Most of his albums have amazing acoustic technique and composition. I had the pleasure of seeing him live also, and he is transcendentally amazing with his playing.

I'd also like to give a nod to country, especially Buck Owens and Willie Nelson.

Dazzling White Diamonds
03-13-2008, 12:47 PM
Charo (http://youtube.com/watch?v=0KZv8l0lKmk) and no, I am not kidding.I almost mentioned her, too, but didn't think anyone would take me seriously. She's damned good.

Triskadecamus
03-13-2008, 12:56 PM
Find a copy of Leo Kotke doing a piece called "Stealin.'" on the Best of. . . album.

It's very cool, especially if you are a fan of Doc Watson's classic "Doc's Guitar."

No one else plays either of these pieces.

John Fayhe, Ry Cooder, Merle Watson, Dave Van Ronk are others you should listen to for just plain good acoustic guitar.

Tris

control-z
03-13-2008, 12:58 PM
The Nirvana Unplugged album is great. Also if you know the certain sites to visit, do a search for Guns and Roses Unplugged, it's my new favorite GnR album.

OneCentStamp
03-13-2008, 01:07 PM
Al DiMeola has been mentioned several times. While he's most associated with jazz, when he picks up his acoustic guitar, he becomes VERY Spanish sounding.

Adrian Legg is amazing. So is Paco de Lucia.

squeegee
03-13-2008, 01:21 PM
Al DiMeola has been mentioned several times. While he's most associated with jazz, when he picks up his acoustic guitar, he becomes VERY Spanish soundingNot to thread-shit, but I've never been a big DiMeola fan, though its been many years since I've listened to him. All technique, amazing picking, and no heart. Its like listening to a sewing machine. YMMV. [/hijack]

UncleRojelio
03-13-2008, 02:06 PM
There is this FretKillr (http://www.youtube.com/user/Fretkillr?ob=1) guy on YouTube. I am memerized by his videos.

I've been to a few Ottmar Liebert (http://www.ottmarliebert.com/) concerts and thought he was pretty darned good.

rayh
03-13-2008, 02:25 PM
I have posted this before but it is worth posting again :-

Laurence Juber - Little Wing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJKfy8sTkSA)

Preston Reed - Ladies Night (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=356ViUx1Ktc)

Muriel Anderson - Lady Pamela (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELRGB9ghOas)

Peppino D'Agostino - Why Not (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brmG6f2BMyw)

Tim Sparks - Mississippi Blues (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTXah51r55g)

Chefguy
03-13-2008, 02:58 PM
The artists that play in Acoustic Alchemy can hit some pretty decent licks, as can Paul Simon (or has he been mentioned?).

Keweenaw
03-13-2008, 03:08 PM
Roy Clark. Yes the guy from Hee Haw. No I'm not kidding.

Loach
03-13-2008, 03:12 PM
Certainly not rock but if you want to hear virtuoso guitar playing you can't beat Christopher Parkening. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEvE_onQbaI&feature=related) Stevie Ray Vaughn (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7ZPMScX9-k) was starting to do some acoustic stuff before he died. I wish I could have seen what he would turned into.

I suggest you watch this. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3XdLlLBvm4) A Steve Morse (The Dregs, Deep Purple), Rik Emmett (Triumph) acoustic duet. It's a song that Morse originally did with Steve Howe (Yes). And here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vh1JcI3lDxE&feature=related) they are playing one of Rik's songs (one of my favorite acoustic pieces when it was originally on the Triumph album Thunder Seven).

And here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1ZmIFR4Sc0) is Steve Howe playing Clap and Mood For A Day.

Exapno Mapcase
03-13-2008, 03:34 PM
Preston Reed - Ladies Night (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=356ViUx1Ktc)
I came in to mention Preston Reed. Unfortunately, even the very good sound on that video doesn't capture what it's like being in the first row of a small club, ten feet away from him live. He is jaw-dropping good.

Kaki King is another one who doesn't sound as good on an album as she does live. However, I like her computer-assisted electric work better than her acoustic stuff.

I've only seen Rodrigo y Gabriella on television. They also use a thumping technique on the guitar that sounds like a drum corps marching. More classical and flamenco, though, than rock. Their album of the same name is excellent.

Bruce Cochburn has been mentioned, but needs more recognition. His "Mistress of Storms," an instrumental with vibraphonist Gary Burton, off his Charity of Night CD, is a particular favorite of mine.

Mister Rik
03-13-2008, 04:09 PM
Charo (http://youtube.com/watch?v=0KZv8l0lKmk) and no, I am not kidding.
Checked out some of her other vids - WOW! All I knew of Charo was what I saw of her guest appearances on various sitcoms in the 1970s. I had no idea she could really play like that!

For the OP, Alex Lifeson does some really nice acoustic work on Rush's latest CD, "Snakes & Arrows". Of course, he uses all sorts of alternate tunings.

Ludovic
03-13-2008, 04:18 PM
Don't know about virtuousity, but these selections are hard-hitting and acoustic:

Places You Have Come to Fear the Most by Dashboard Confessional. Now, their current live shows and later albums are not acoustic (although they do as good a job as any of electrifying an existing whine-rock acoustic song, which is to say, they still do pretty bad at it. Despite having the help of the bassist who played the best bassline in the world (Best Looking Boys -- Scott Schoenbeck who was at the time in the Promise Ring.)) Sure, there are several slower acoustic ballads but there are plenty of acoustic rockers on that album too.

Led Zepplin - Over the Hills and Far Away Their verison of Gallows Pole is one of the hardest hitting rock songs -- bar none -- despite its acousticity.

paffinity
03-13-2008, 04:37 PM
I would like to second whoever mentioned Rodrigo y Gabriela. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LU68qT4T1bE)

They're about the closest thing you can get to rock stars with classical guitars. When I saw them in concert Rodrigo wore a Testament t-shirt and they covered One by Metallica!

tds1273
03-13-2008, 05:26 PM
I would like to second whoever mentioned Rodrigo y Gabriela. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LU68qT4T1bE)


Three times...


Buckethead (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckethead), as weird as he might be, his talent is 10-fold of that.

If you care to count the ukulele, look up Jake Shimabukuro (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jake_Shimabukuro). I was just recently introduced to his amazing work when he was on Late Night a couple of weeks ago. I wholeheartedly agree with Conan when he said it was one of the greatest acts to appear on the show.

shelbo
03-13-2008, 06:03 PM
Phil Keaggy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jcji2gYJkI&feature=user) is great.

Oslo Ostragoth
03-13-2008, 11:54 PM
In addition to John Renbourn, from the same stable there's Richard Thompson - check out this live performance of Vincent Black Lightning (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azB7B8hrVZY).That is teary-eyed brilliant.

JustThinkin'
03-14-2008, 07:37 AM
Lindsay Buckingham has done some pretty amazing stuff on acoustic guitar.
That'd be Fleetwood Mac for those unfamiliar with 70s rock. Check out Landslide for a good example. Also, the song title escapes me but the main lyrics are: "been down one time, been down two time, never going down again." Awesome guitar on that one.

WordMan
03-14-2008, 08:29 AM
Can I just say how bummed I am that I have been on the road and under hard deadlines? :mad: I would've loved to have jumped in earlier - lots of interesting stuff; not much to add!

AndyPolley
03-14-2008, 08:29 AM
Give Tim Reynolds a listen to.
I wouldn't skip Dave Matthews either. Say what you will of his voice, his guitar playing is very interesting, oddly complicated, and if you're taking lessons-quite fun to play along with.

Check out The California Guitar Trio. Good stuff. http://www.cgtrio.com/

control-z
03-14-2008, 10:33 AM
That'd be Fleetwood Mac for those unfamiliar with 70s rock. Check out Landslide for a good example. Also, the song title escapes me but the main lyrics are: "been down one time, been down two time, never going down again." Awesome guitar on that one.

That would be Never Going Back Again, awesome song.

Gangster Octopus
03-14-2008, 10:38 AM
I have a question for the guitar folks. I was reading Wikipedia, I think, about Charo and she said that good guitar players play with their thumb behind the neck, something she was taught by Andres Segovia. Is this a common thought or just a particular one of some folks?

squeegee
03-14-2008, 10:48 AM
I have a question for the guitar folks. I was reading Wikipedia, I think, about Charo and she said that good guitar players play with their thumb behind the neck, something she was taught by Andres Segovia. Is this a common thought or just a particular one of some folks?Its a classical guitar thing -- I think she meant that good classical players play with the fingers on the neck parallel to the frets, which is good for playing on a wide fretboard. Your average rock/blues player will play with the fingers at an angle to the frets, which is fine for electric guitars with thinner necks. Nothing wrong with either technique, they're just made for different types of instruments.

OneCentStamp
03-14-2008, 10:54 AM
I have a question for the guitar folks. I was reading Wikipedia, I think, about Charo and she said that good guitar players play with their thumb behind the neck, something she was taught by Andres Segovia. Is this a common thought or just a particular one of some folks?It's a common thought, but a classical-centric one. Electric players, especially rock players (who tend to use a lot of barre chords), usually grip the neck more like a baseball bat - thumb over the top. For a long time, it was considered "poor technique" to do so.

Labdad
03-14-2008, 11:20 AM
Chris Smither is excellent! See for yourself here (http://youtube.com/watch?v=8xSOODkGJ64&feature=related) and here (http://youtube.com/watch?v=ipfZ7QGjZL8) for just a couple of examples.

Shoeless
03-14-2008, 02:08 PM
I'm far from an expert in guitar, but I've always been impressed with Steve Hackett.
Seconded. I've always been a big fan of Steve Hackett, both when he was with Genesis and some of his earlier solo work. He does some nice acoustic stuff, especially with a 12-string.

Mister Rik
03-14-2008, 02:10 PM
I have a question for the guitar folks. I was reading Wikipedia, I think, about Charo and she said that good guitar players play with their thumb behind the neck, something she was taught by Andres Segovia. Is this a common thought or just a particular one of some folks?
It's common (and pretty essential) for bass players to keep their thumb behind the neck.

Zsofia
03-15-2008, 04:18 PM
Hey, if anybody hasn't seen that Fretkillr guy on YouTube (thanks, UncleRojelio), take a look - it's fascinating because the camera is right on his fingers on the frets, so you really get a good look at exactly what's going on. I haven't seen anything else at that angle, and it really is fascinating. (Plus, the guy is awesome - this is exactly what I'd like to do.)

squeegee
03-16-2008, 12:35 AM
Hey, if anybody hasn't seen that Fretkillr guy on YouTube (thanks, UncleRojelio), take a look - it's fascinating because the camera is right on his fingers on the frets, so you really get a good look at exactly what's going on. I haven't seen anything else at that angle, and it really is fascinating. (Plus, the guy is awesome - this is exactly what I'd like to do.)I like the camera angle (it's shot from a point looking from above the headstock down the neck, so you can see both hands) but it was more useful usually for seeing his right hand picking than his left hand on the frets. The fretting fingers tended to obscure each other from that angle. But still really well done, nice guitar play.

Diogenes the Cynic
03-16-2008, 01:08 AM
It's a common thought, but a classical-centric one. Electric players, especially rock players (who tend to use a lot of barre chords), usually grip the neck more like a baseball bat - thumb over the top. For a long time, it was considered "poor technique" to do so.
Until Jimi Hendrix did it. He fretted a lot of the bottom notes with his thumb.

It's Not Rocket Surgery!
03-16-2008, 06:42 PM
How about some 42-string guitar playing? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XYkcNmdQu0)

Exapno Mapcase
03-16-2008, 07:43 PM
How about some 42-string guitar playing? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XYkcNmdQu0)
I saw Pat Methany in concert and that, um, thing sounds amazing.

You go to see Pat Methany for his electric guitar, though, good as he is on acoustic.

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
03-16-2008, 08:35 PM
While we're on the subject of acoustic guitarists who use unusual instruments, (and I love Pat Metheny - one of these days I'll get around to collecting all of his albums.) here are two clips of John McLaughlin - demonstrating (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0LsNC5WaFc&feature=related) his scalloped fretboard guitar and playing with Shakti (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h2uL8lk2lM&feature=related) .
And this is Harry Manx (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3BPY0QFask&feature=related) . One of my students wants to play exactly like this... I haven't a clue what to tell him.

Olive, The Other Reindeer
03-16-2008, 08:51 PM
I have to nominate Joscho Stephan (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_pfmrj0rxc) as being one of, if not the best guitarists alive today.

I get goosebumps every time I watch this video.

Olive

elelle
03-16-2008, 09:14 PM
ZSof, out of so many blues musicians I could name that have influenced many of the guitarists named here, I'm going to recommend one lesser known guy,Blind Willie Johnson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_Willie_Johnson). You hear his music all the time---the riffs from "Dark Was The Night, Cold Was The Ground" have been used greatly by Ry Cooder, and on plenty of commercials. It's that plaintive wailing guitar sound, remniscent of the desert. It was really a unique sound in his day, and now pretty well known as an archetype.

He needs to get his due, rest his soul. "Dark Was The Night..." was sent off into the cosmos on the Voyager spacecraft, so that's a testimony to his power. A very different sort of musician, and will take you into another space entirely learning to play.

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