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malkavia
04-08-2008, 06:11 PM
So two and a half years into guitar ownership, it has occured to me that I'm probably never going to be able to play any chord requiring barring or skipping frets (B, Fm, etc.), but I'd love to learn to play a few more somewhat modern, easy songs.

I can play the following chords with no issue: G, C, D, E, Em, A, Am, D, F (kinda).

So far I've learned the following songs:

Refreshments - Mekong
Gin Blossoms - Follow You Down
Greenday - Good Riddance

I can also play most of...
Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers - Green and Dumb
Jeff Buckley - Hallelujah
Melissa Etheridge - Angels Would Fall

And a just a wee bit of about 50 songs.

Now, I know we have some pretty heavy-duty guitar enthusiasts on this board and while I appreciate (and am quite envious of) your passion and ability, I am not looking to reach that level of playing and I can't read tabs to save my life.

Basically, I just want a few fun songs I can learn and play to myself when I get some time alone with my guitar and the couch.

Any recommendations?

NAF1138
04-08-2008, 06:28 PM
So two and a half years into guitar ownership, it has occured to me that I'm probably never going to be able to play any chord requiring barring or skipping frets (B, Fm, etc.), but I'd love to learn to play a few more somewhat modern, easy songs.

I can play the following chords with no issue: G, C, D, E, Em, A, Am, D, F (kinda).

So far I've learned the following songs:

Refreshments - Mekong
Gin Blossoms - Follow You Down
Greenday - Good Riddance

I can also play most of...
Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers - Green and Dumb
Jeff Buckley - Hallelujah
Melissa Etheridge - Angels Would Fall

And a just a wee bit of about 50 songs.

Now, I know we have some pretty heavy-duty guitar enthusiasts on this board and while I appreciate (and am quite envious of) your passion and ability, I am not looking to reach that level of playing and I can't read tabs to save my life.

Basically, I just want a few fun songs I can learn and play to myself when I get some time alone with my guitar and the couch.

Any recommendations?

I always recommend Credence Clearwater Revival for these sorts of situations. Partly because they are what I learned to play when I was starting, so they spring to mind quickly, but mostly because they are fun easy and self contained.

Bad Moon Rising
Have you Ever Seen the Rain
Who'll Stop the Rain
Lookin' Out My Backdoor
Lodai
Down on the Corner

Each and every one a classic, and a fun easy to play song that sounds good as a solo acoustic piece.

Also, it will get you working on your F chords.

Don't get down about barr chords, about 2 years in is about the time to really start worrying about them. I would say you are on the right pace. Keep at it and they will seem easy in no time.

Ximenean
04-08-2008, 06:36 PM
With G, C, D, Em and Am you can play loads of simple songs in the key of G (or of Em). The first four are the important I, IV, V and vi chords, and Am is the also commonly used ii chord. It would help if you could learn D7, which is dead easy, because the V chord is very often a seventh.

Other simple songs, just transpose them into G! Like if it requires E-A-B, avoid the B by playing G-C-D instead. It'll sound much the same.

Sam Stone
04-08-2008, 06:37 PM
Half the Eagles catalog can be played with the chords you've learned. Songs like 'Best of My Love' and "Lyin' Eyes' are very easy to learn.


"House of the Rising Sun" is easy and a good intro to fingerpicking.

Also, learning barre chords just takes practice. "Hotel California" is a good song to practice barre chords with - give it a try.

rayh
04-08-2008, 08:00 PM
"You've Got to Hide Your Love Away" - The Beatles

"American Pie" - Don Mclean

"Substitute" - The Who

JohnT
04-08-2008, 08:28 PM
"Yellow Submarine" - The Beatles
"A Horse with No Name" - America

sleestak
04-08-2008, 10:04 PM
So two and a half years into guitar ownership, it has occured to me that I'm probably never going to be able to play any chord requiring barring or skipping frets (B, Fm, etc.), but I'd love to learn to play a few more somewhat modern, easy songs.

::post snipped::

Are there any particular reasons you think you won't be able to play barre chords or other types of chords? We've got a good bunch of players on the Board and I imagine if we knew what troubles you are having someone would probably have either exercises for it or good suggestions* on how to work around the issue.

Slee

I am ok at chord stuff, I tend to use some odd ones at times, but I know there are people on the board better than I at that kind of stuff.

Randy Seltzer
04-08-2008, 11:02 PM
I can play the following chords with no issue: G, C, D, E, Em, A, Am, D, F (kinda).Easy chords you should learn:

Dsus2, Dsus4 ("Free Fallin'" is D, D, Dsus4, Dsus4, D, A)
Dm
G/C (Lots of people play this instead of G)

Look up the Barenaked Ladies catalog. Their songs are universally easy, fun to play, and seem to be roughly in your generational timespan(?). Check out also Oasis ("Don't Look Back in Anger" is all chords you can play plus an Fm, which isn't hard).

But really, about three quarters of all songs ever are just Am, G, F, which you can play. (And the other quarter are all Pachebel's canon in D (http://youtube.com/watch?v=JdxkVQy7QLM).)

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
04-08-2008, 11:44 PM
Okay, let me introduce you to the campfire 16 -
Major chords E, A, D, G, C
Minor chords e min, a min, d min and there's an e-z version of b min
Dom. Seventh chords, usually just called 'Sevenths' - F# 7, B7, E7, A7, D7, G7 and C7.

with these 16, you can play tons of the guitar based rep in arrangement. Go to a place like Chordie.com (where they have a handy transpose button) and try shifting a piece up and down until every chord in it is one of the campfire 16.

There are lots of other chords that can be substituted - d min sounds in context like F6, for example.

Barre chords are something I advise you to hook up with a teacher or a mentor to learn properly. It's easy to learn them wrong and go through a lot of effort to get them to be ergonomically sound. Some tricks - don't put a lot of work into the standard F barred at the first fret. There are other, non-barred ways of doing F, and that position of F - Bb - Eb are the hardest barres on the instrument. I like to start students with the three string barred a min (at the fifth fret, 3rd or 4th finger on the seventh fret of the 4th string, open 5th string) or the d min (same thing at the tenth fret with the open 4th string.) If you must work on six string barres, do it at the 7th fret where it's easier...

I'm none too sure what you mean by skipping frets - do you mean having more than one fret between any two fingers? Again, part of that is (gently) getting used to the stretch, and that's easier up the fingerboard where the frets are closer together.

In Toronto, there are lots of places to take group classes in guitar, which can be an absolute blast, plus you get several different people sharing their ideas about what's easy. There may be something available near you...

Hope this helps.

Nunavut Boy
04-08-2008, 11:56 PM
Power chords are super easy to play and are moveable pretty much anywhere on the guitar. Once you learn them, you can play most Nirvana songs, lots of White Stripes songs...actually most '90s alterna-rock songs.

malkavia
04-09-2008, 12:43 AM
Woo, these are all great! I'm excited about learning The Eagles and Credence. I looove American Pie (who doesn't?) and Horse w/ No Name. *rubs hands together greedily*

sleestak, I know I should learn barre chords but I'm a bit impatient and I want to be a rockstar nowNowNOW. ;)

I'm going to throw a lot of effort into mastering "the campfire 16", that sounds juust like what I'm looking for.

And yes, by skipping frets I mean stretching my hand from, say, the 2nd to 4th fret. My thumb pops over the top of the neck (I know, I know.. I'm trying to curb that) and I can't get enough pressure to keep the strings from buzzing like crazy.

Keep em coming, I'm building a spreadsheet! :)

Nunavut Boy, I've heard of these power chords, but don't really understand what they are or how they work.

WordMan
04-09-2008, 09:29 AM
This is all good - not much to add. I guess I would point to something - your right hand (assuming your right-handed - your strum/pick hand, either way)...

When I think back to my early days (a very long time ago :( ) or when I am trying to show someone something, I find that the real difference between how they sound and how I now sound is the rhythm - picking or strumming, when you "lock into" the groove of the song (whether it is a slow waltz or speed metal, the song has it's own groove) you sound better.

I tended to pick easy chord patterns such as:

E A D A - That's What I Like About You by The Romantics (it's more complex, but this will do)

C F G F - Good Lovin'

D G A G - La Bamba

G F C F - Night Moves by Bob Seeger

And play them for hours. Speed them up and slow them down - insert breaks (e.g., in La Bamba, play the groove, end up on the A and hold it for a bit - it will make musical sense when you try it) then start the riff again. Use your strum hand to dampen the strings vs. whacking the strings wide open. If you actually want to the learn the song that these grooves are in, that's fine, but that's not my point - just play the freakin' groove and rock out. :cool:

Mix it up and try to "sell" the rhythm and make it rock and roll.

Pick a few of these circular chord riffs that you like and play them as a warm up before you play other stuff. They can be really fun and your rhythm playing will benefit - you increase your muscle memory for how to lock into a groove...

dwc1970
04-09-2008, 10:02 AM
I've heard of these power chords, but don't really understand what they are or how they work.

Here's a Wikipedia link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_chord) on power chords.

minlokwat
04-09-2008, 10:19 AM
Not much new to add.

Be sure you've memorized all of your chord shapings and that you can transition from any chord to any other chord smoothly and easily.

Start learning your minors, sevenths and minor sevenths -most of which are pretty easy.

Start learning to read tabs. Start with an easy song like "Pretty Woman" or "Blister in the Sun" more just to get a feel of how tablatures are set up. The Beatles' "Ticket to Ride" isn't too tough either just to name a few.

Lastly and most importantly, you didn't mention whether you do this but you add a much more significant layer to your playing if you learn to sing as well. Whether you are on-key or not or self-conscious about it, start singing along as you strum and your enjoyment level increases exponentially.

Bridget Burke
04-09-2008, 10:28 AM
....Lastly and most importantly, you didn't mention whether you do this but you add a much more significant layer to your playing if you learn to sing as well. Whether you are on-key or not or self-conscious about it, start singing along as you strum and your enjoyment level increases exponentially.

Which is one reason that "folk music" is a good place to start. My singing might make the cat leave the room, but it's lot of fun. And there's that old folkie boast: "I know all three chords in all five keys."

Those weird chords do get easier if you keep practicing.

malkavia
04-09-2008, 12:48 PM
This is all good - not much to add. I guess I would point to something - your right hand (assuming your right-handed - your strum/pick hand, either way)...
Strumming is its own tragedy for me. I'm left-handed but purchased and learned to play on a right-handed guitar. This means that chord transitions were a bit easier for me to learn than I'd expected, but that strumming is challenging and picking/plucking is an exercise in futility. It's coming along though and I appreciate your recommendations. I could really use a few songs to make me stretch my strumming ability.

Lastly and most importantly, you didn't mention whether you do this but you add a much more significant layer to your playing if you learn to sing as well. Whether you are on-key or not or self-conscious about it, start singing along as you strum and your enjoyment level increases exponentially.
Oh yeah, I'm all about singing. I was rocking the house (and cats) with Have You Ever Seen the Rain last night. My singing helps to mask some of the aforementioned strumtardation. ;)

I'll definitely try to work out tabs with Blister in the Sun and/or Pretty Woman. My initial foray into tabs was trying to play Man Who Sold the World and Pearl Jam's Black.

NAF1138
04-09-2008, 01:11 PM
Strumming is its own tragedy for me. I'm left-handed but purchased and learned to play on a right-handed guitar. This means that chord transitions were a bit easier for me to learn than I'd expected, but that strumming is challenging and picking/plucking is an exercise in futility. It's coming along though and I appreciate your recommendations. I could really use a few songs to make me stretch my strumming ability.


Don't worry about learning on a righty guitar. Guitar is a two handed instrument, I have personally never understood why there need to be two types.

For a nice simple song that get's you some easy finger picking and a few simple barre chords (that could be played as power chords) I would go for The Who's Behind Blue Eyes.

Also, take a look at the songs WordMan recommended. I know that personally La Bamba was a breakthrough song for me when I was learning to deal with strum patterns. The quick changes in it force you to learn to seperate the struming from the fretting and start treating them as independant actions. Again, going back to Creedence (I really do think Creedence is the ultimate band for beginers) Bad Moon Rising is a good one for working on a natural smooth pace, and Lookin' Out My Backdoor will get you a good shuffle strum, which is a handly tool to have.

Keep at it and you will get there.

WordMan
04-09-2008, 01:47 PM
Strumming is its own tragedy for me. I'm left-handed but purchased and learned to play on a right-handed guitar. This means that chord transitions were a bit easier for me to learn than I'd expected, but that strumming is challenging and picking/plucking is an exercise in futility. It's coming along though and I appreciate your recommendations. I could really use a few songs to make me stretch my strumming ability.



I hear you - that's why I said hours at a stretch. Get an unplugged electric guitar - quiet and easier to fret chords - sit in front of the TV (I watch baseball) and mechanically go through your chord patterns. I sat there and mindlessly played La Bamba, etc. - before I knew it, I had the mechanical act of forming chords and transitioning between them down, then I got a regular strum pattern down - and THEN I could groove. At that point - w00t! You're in bidness, my friend!

malkavia
04-09-2008, 03:55 PM
I hear you - that's why I said hours at a stretch. Get an unplugged electric guitar - quiet and easier to fret chords - sit in front of the TV (I watch baseball) and mechanically go through your chord patterns. I sat there and mindlessly played La Bamba, etc. - before I knew it, I had the mechanical act of forming chords and transitioning between them down, then I got a regular strum pattern down - and THEN I could groove. At that point - w00t! You're in bidness, my friend!

Well, I've been playing on a lil' Fender Squire, I love baseball and I have a couch so I'm all set. :cool:

Kuboydal
04-09-2008, 05:05 PM
The chords you have will allow you to become the johnny cash superstar. no campfire is complete without Folsom Prison , Cocaine Blues, and Long Black Veil. I mix it up with some EZ PZ Dylan selections off of the Basement Tapes. Chordie.com has become a source of nigh eternal happiness to me.

Randy Seltzer
04-09-2008, 06:05 PM
E A D A - That's What I Like About You by The Romantics (it's more complex, but this will do)

C F G F - Good Lovin'

D G A G - La Bamba

G F C F - Night Moves by Bob SeegerThis reminded me -
A D E D - Wild Thing

lobotomyboy63
04-09-2008, 08:38 PM
If you have some chords that are hard to play, you can often transpose them to a different key and have much easier chords to play.

1-B#/C
2-C#/Db
3-D
4-D#/Eb
5-E/Fb
6-F
7-F#/Gb
8-G
9-G#/Ab
10-A
11-A#/Bb
12=B/Cb
13=B#/C
14-C#/Db
15-D
16-D#/Eb
17-E/Fb
18-F
19-F#/Gb
20-G
21-G#/Ab
22-A
23-A#/Bb
24=B/Cb
25=B#/C



For instance:

Suppose your chords say Bb, Eb, F....looking at the above chart, Bb is 11, Eb is 16, and F is 18. So you could subtract 1 from each and get 10, 14, and 17, which are A, D, and E, easy chords. Or, you could add 2 to each and get 13, 18, and 20, which are C, F, and G. Or you could subtract 8 from each and get 3, 8, and 10: D, G, and A.

Any of these would preserve the "interval" between chords, but some may sound better than others because they're closer to the original chord formations on guitar.

1) If you're just trying to fit the chords to your vocal range, any of the above might work.

2) If you want to play with the recording and stay close to the original sound, it's best to subtract. In the above example if you subtract 1, then capo 1, you'll be back at the pitches originally intended because you lowered when transposing, then raised it back with the capo. But if you really liked playing it in C and were willing to capo up to the 10th fret, you could play it there.

3) It's very important to transfer the *type* of chord. For instance if you're transposing a C# minor, make sure the end result is also a minor. The same holds true for major 7's, dominant 7's, augmented chords, etc.

4) Transposing won't make every song easy. For instance, "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" can be transposed so the first part is easy, but then it rises half a step at the end. So you might be playing in D for much of the song, but the key will end up as Eb. If you set it up to end in D, the first part will be in Db. Sometimes, there's just no getting around the issue.

And in case you haven't found it, here's a source of many songs:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/

lobotomyboy63
04-09-2008, 08:45 PM
Oops, missed the Edit window. For instance:

Suppose your chords say Bb, Eb, F....looking at the above chart, Bb is 11, Eb is 16, and F is 18. So you could subtract 1 from each and get 10, 15, and 17, which are A, D, and E, easy chords. Or, you could add 2 to each and get 13, 18, and 20, which are C, F, and G. Or you could subtract 8 from each and get 3, 8, and 10: D, G, and A.

Windwalker
04-09-2008, 09:47 PM
Requisite Elliott Smith pimping here. His easiest songs that I've tried are "Needle in the Hay" and "2:45 AM". Very nice, but downbeat songs.

Rasa
04-09-2008, 11:05 PM
The three songs I can play on guitar, and I know nothing about music:

Jane Says by Jane's Addiction, is all G and A minor if I recall correctly
Just Like Heaven by The Cure is as well (I couldn't do the fancy stuff in the bridge)

Strangely, I could also play Under the Milky Way by the Church. (Or Cult?)

Clothahump
04-10-2008, 05:43 PM
So two and a half years into guitar ownership, it has occured to me that I'm probably never going to be able to play any chord requiring barring or skipping frets (B, Fm, etc.), but I'd love to learn to play a few more somewhat modern, easy songs.

I can play the following chords with no issue: G, C, D, E, Em, A, Am, D, F (kinda).

You can play most of John Denver's stuff with those chords. And everyone knows a JD song or two.

Siege
04-10-2008, 05:54 PM
Crosby, Stills, and Nash's Southern Cross is another easy, three chord song. As I recall (it's been a while since I played it), it only uses A, D, and E.

Don't fight the hypothetical
04-10-2008, 11:29 PM
I understand the no barre chord thing.. but they become invaluable when learning to pick out songs you don't have tab to. It took me a while to learn them but after it clicked I can't live without them.

dwc1970
04-11-2008, 10:06 AM
Crosby, Stills, and Nash's Southern Cross is another easy, three chord song. As I recall (it's been a while since I played it), it only uses A, D, and E.

There's a G chord in it, too. I don't recall there being any any E chords in it, though, playing what I know of the song on my mental jukebox.

GargoyleWB
04-11-2008, 02:59 PM
Most of Pink Floyd's repertoire for the rhythm is your basic G,C,D,F and an occasional A.

Look for "Pigs on the Wing", "Wish You Were Here", "Mother" as being surprisingly easy to play.

Even Gilmour's solos aren't too difficult, he plays very slowly with simple bends and pull-offs, sprinkled with short noodling that rarely lasts more than a half-dozen notes. Polishing that simplicity into the transcendental ambrosia of virtuosity that is his final product still takes great skill and gear (that I haven't achieved yet), but you can get 90% of the way there really easily.

stpauler
04-11-2008, 03:45 PM
I've been playing guitar for about 15 years now and I remember the first song I learned to play was Jane's Addiction's "Jane Says" as Rasa recommended. It's a simple G-A and back again for the most part.

There's one program that's really helped me learn the guitar, use my ear, and figure out chords to a song. It's called Digital Music Mentor (http://www.sienzo.com/) and I have been indebted to its technology. It's not perfect, but it's helped me so much and I recommend it to guitar players.

Other easy songs:
One by U2 (Verse: Am Dsus2 Fmaj7 G x2 Chorus: C Am Fmaj7 x2)
Talkin' 'Bout a Revolution by Tracy Chapman (G Cadd9 Em D over and over)
Closer to Fine by Indigo Girls (Long chord pattern, but instantly recognizable)
Big Yellow Taxi by Joni Mitchell (Chords here (http://jmdl.com/guitar/tab.cfm?id=250) by permission of the artist. This is a nice gentle intro to barre chords)
Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, and Chris Isaak are three artists whose entire catalog is pretty much fully accessible.

The verses for Counting Crows' "Round Here" is an easy picking repetition (think Dm but slide it up 4 frets)

E|-----5--------5------------
B|--------8--------8------8--
G|---7--------7--------7-----

and the chorus is
C D Em G

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
04-11-2008, 08:27 PM
Hey, Malkavia, I just noticed something in your OP that got me curious - you're saying you have a tough time reading tab? (Yeah, I'm perceptive - that took me three days to figure out?) D'ye mind if I ask what about tabs you're having trouble with? I've found them extremely useful even for advanced players because you can write out unusual positions that you wouldn't have thought of first time through.

Somehow, that came out dirtier than I meant...

Anyway, even if you only want to stick to chords and the odd riff or fill, tab can be a useful thing to figure out.

dasilva94
04-12-2008, 11:05 PM
I have no problem using my index finger to form Barre chords.

The problem I have is forming 'barre chords', where you use your thumb to fret the low E and your index finger to barre the B and C strings, and using your remaining fingers to complete the chord.

I find this extemely difficult!

Does anyone have any hints about to form this kind of chord?

Lisa-go-Blind
04-13-2008, 03:11 AM
In addition to the chords listed in the OP, you should be able to play other common open chords, like dm, A7, E7, em7, B7, am7, D7, G7. Flipping through my guitar notebook, here are some songs with just a few chords and no barring. I've listed all the chords used in the song, but not necessarily in the right order.

Bob Dylan - "The Mighty Quinn" (G, D, C)
Bob Dylan - "I Shall Be Released" (C, dm, em)
Bruce Springsteen - "Atlantic City" (em, G, C, D)
Dolly Parton - "Jolene" (A, C, G)
"Long Black Veil" (G, D, C)
Oasis - "Wonderwall" (em, G, D, A, C, A7)
Oasis - "Live Forever" (G, D, am7, C, em)
Simple Minds - "Don't You Forget About Me" (E, D, A, C, G)
Love - "A House Is Not A Motel" (em, G, am, C, D)
The Decemberists - "The Crane Wife 3" (D, A, G)
Joan Baez - "Diamonds and Rust" (em, C, G, D)
Joan Baez - "Love is Just a Four-Letter Word" (G, D, em, am, D7)
The Rolling Stones - "Ruby Tuesday" (em, D, C, D7, G, A7)
The Rolling Stones - "As Tears Go By" (G, A, C, D, em, D7)
Van Morrison - "Wonderful Remark" (G, D, C, em)
Van Morrison - "And It Stoned Me" (G, D, C, am, em)
Cat Power - "Metal Heart" (am, C, G, D)
Editors - "An End Has A Start" (am, em, C, D,G)
Flying Burrito Brothers - "Older Guys" (G, D, em, C)
"Will The Circle Be Unbroken?" (E, A, B7)
Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - "Make Me Smile" (C, G, D, am)

Tons more open up if you can add just F and bm. Once you learn barring, then you can play almost anything. Really, the only way you'll be able to play barre chords is if you make yourself play them. It is discouraging at first when you get a loud buzz or a muffled sound, but soon your hand will figure out the right position and develop the strength needed to play it right. It may be less frustrating to start with a song that uses all open chords except one (The Band's "Up On Cripple Creek" has a f#m in the chorus; "Victoria" by The Kinks has a bm). When it's just one chord, it makes less of an impact in the song if you don't play the chord perfectly at first. Hopefully, you'll be confident enough in your open chords to motivate yourself to get that one barre chord just right so you can play the whole song start to end.

WordMan
04-13-2008, 11:59 AM
I have no problem using my index finger to form Barre chords.

The problem I have is forming 'barre chords', where you use your thumb to fret the low E and your index finger to barre the B and C strings, and using your remaining fingers to complete the chord.

I find this extemely difficult!

Does anyone have any hints about to form this kind of chord?

Hmm - there is no "C" string in standard tuning EADGBE, but I suspect I understand the crux of your question: how do you form chords where you use your thumb to fret low notes - especially chords where you also anchor your index finger to form a sorta-barre? Is that it?

A few points:
- That approach is really the domain of the blues player - and an electric bluesman typically. If you aren't focused on this style, that approach may be considered bad form. Classical and shredding, to cite two examples, both view a thumb-on-back approach to hand position as essential.

- So, starting from electric blues - you have a couple of things typically happening:



Blues and rock playing requires you to use what I refer to as a Cheater's A: rather than fretting it with one string per finger (all 2nd fret, the DG & B strings), you just fold in the tip of your index finger and flatten the pad of it over all three strings, pushing down and bending the digit knuckle back. You have to do this to play Chuck Berry rock and roll, where you just play the A and D strings while playing a Cheater's A and bouncing your ring finger off the D String, 4th fret. Try this - the riff is woven into the world's DNA by this point.
At the same time, when you play an electric for rock, it is a very noisy affair. Feedback, errant string scrapes, the squeaks and honks of kicking effects pedals on, etc. I've always said a good electric player spends 50% of their time trying to get the sounds they want and the other 50% keeping everything else quiet - seriously. As a player, you just find yourself (in addition to striving to be an accurate picker, which is key to lower noise) using your non-chording fingers to mute unused strings. A classic way to do this is to let your thumb just rest on the E - you can bang a full Cheater's A with Townshend abandon and keep the bullfrog E from runing the chord.
So personally, my approach to that type of chording - which by the way is usually associated with Jimi Hendrix, who did it liberally and had HUGE honkin' hands - started from the Cheater's A + muting strings with my thumb over the top. After years of living in that position, it wasn't a stretch to get used to fretting that way.


Does that help?

lobotomyboy63
04-13-2008, 12:07 PM
I have no problem using my index finger to form Barre chords.

The problem I have is forming 'barre chords', where you use your thumb to fret the low E and your index finger to barre the B and C strings, and using your remaining fingers to complete the chord.

I find this extemely difficult!

Does anyone have any hints about to form this kind of chord?

I think you mean B and E.

Your index spans the entire fret...they just don't show it that way. You can also play abbreviated chords by fingering the lower (DGBE) strings and not strumming the top (E/A) strings.

@Lisa: I play "Jolene" Am, C, G, Am, G, Em, Am

Chefguy
04-13-2008, 02:04 PM
You can play almost the entire Neil Diamond songbook with 3-4 chords, primarily E, A and D, just by altering the rhythms and chord order slightly.

Nunavut Boy
04-13-2008, 02:58 PM
Your index spans the entire fret...they just don't show it that way. You can also play abbreviated chords by fingering the lower (DGBE) strings and not strumming the top (E/A) strings.

Not necessarily. I play barre chords much like how WordMan describes, as I learned the blues way. As for a good way to learn it, I don't have a good answer for that. I just kept at it until I was able to do it. It took a while. Took even longer to master the minor version (index over GBE strings, thumb on low E while muting A and ring finger 2 frets ahead on the D string)

lobotomyboy63
04-13-2008, 05:49 PM
Not necessarily. I play barre chords much like how WordMan describes, as I learned the blues way. As for a good way to learn it, I don't have a good answer for that. I just kept at it until I was able to do it. It took a while. Took even longer to master the minor version (index over GBE strings, thumb on low E while muting A and ring finger 2 frets ahead on the D string)

Interesting. I've never seen that done. There are a few songs I'll play using thumb for the bass (Am/G, Am/F#) but it's awkward.

Lisa-go-Blind
04-13-2008, 07:43 PM
@Lisa: I play "Jolene" Am, C, G, Am, G, Em, Am
I do too, actually. I didn't double-check the chords I posted. Good catch.

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