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View Full Version : How do you roast a chile


Johnny L.A.
04-13-2008, 01:32 AM
I thought I might try to make chile rellenos, so I picked up some Anaheim chilies. Only the recipes I've found assume you've roasted and 'skinned' a chile before. Not me. When I eat fresh chiles they're raw. I assume I just put the chiles into a hot oven to roast them, but for how long? What do they mean 'skin the chile'?

Queen Bruin
04-13-2008, 01:40 AM
Cut your chile in half, deseed and take out the stem. Rub them with a little bit of oil - veg oil is fine. Put them on a broiler pan skin-side up and broil them on the second rack from the top. Broil until the skin is black and blistery, then plop them into a paper bag, roll up the bag, and let them sit for about 5 minutes. The skins should come right off with a little rubbing. If I'm roasting something more potent than a jalapeno, I use rubber gloves.

At this point, your peppers can be easily chopped and added to anything.

Ogre
04-13-2008, 01:42 AM
Cut your chile in half, deseed and take out the stem. Rub them with a little bit of oil - veg oil is fine. Put them on a broiler pan skin-side up and broil them on the second rack from the top. Broil until the skin is black and blistery, then plop them into a paper bag, roll up the bag, and let them sit for about 5 minutes. The skins should come right off with a little rubbing. If I'm roasting something more potent than a jalapeno, I use rubber gloves.

At this point, your peppers can be easily chopped and added to anything.+1 on the method. I've always put them into a cold bath after the roast, but YMMV.

Rick
04-13-2008, 02:07 AM
You can also do them on a gas stove top. Or on a BBQ grill.
If they look almost burnt, they aren't roasted. If they look black and beyond redemption, they are just right.

Butterscotch
04-13-2008, 08:01 AM
You can also do them on a gas stove top. Or on a BBQ grill.
If they look almost burnt, they aren't roasted. If they look black and beyond redemption, they are just right.

This is the quickest way, but you need to prick them otherwise they can explode and you don't want all that juice and flesh spraying everywhere...

Once they are good and burnt pop them in a plastic bag for a couple of minutes to sweat and the skin will come away easily. Some people recommend washing them but I find this washes away the juices and flavour.

Johnny L.A.
04-13-2008, 10:45 AM
Thanks for the answers. I'm guessing a 450ºF oven? Or should I just turn it on 'broil'?
You can also do them on a gas stove top.
Strangely, the gas company hasn't figured out how to run a pipe 200 or 300 feet from the main to my house.

Rick
04-13-2008, 10:52 AM
Thanks for the answers. I'm guessing a 450ºF oven? Or should I just turn it on 'broil'?

Strangely, the gas company hasn't figured out how to run a pipe 200 or 300 feet from the main to my house.
Sucks to be you. :)

Johnny L.A.
04-13-2008, 11:17 AM
Sucks to be you. :)
¡Bastardo grande! :p

Musicat
04-13-2008, 11:42 AM
I thought I might try to make chile rellenos, so I picked up some Anaheim chilies. Only the recipes I've found assume you've roasted and 'skinned' a chile before. IANACook, but why is this required?

My Mexican former-gf used to put chilies right on the gas stove burner next to the flame and rotate them until she got the desired doneness. Made a bit of a mess on the stove, tho.

I use several kinds of chilies in cooking frequently, but just chop them up raw. Doesn't seem to be a problem.

However, IANACook. Did I say that before?

pulykamell
04-13-2008, 11:56 AM
IANACook, but why is this required?

Develops flavor.


My Mexican former-gf used to put chilies right on the gas stove burner next to the flame and rotate them until she got the desired doneness. Made a bit of a mess on the stove, tho.

I do them on the stove, as well, and then throw 'em into a bag for 5 minutes or so.


I use several kinds of chilies in cooking frequently, but just chop them up raw. Doesn't seem to be a problem.

It won't be a problem. It's just taste a little different.

Ah, here's a nice video (http://youtube.com/watch?v=7MXOGYnN2A8) of Zarela Martinez showing how to roast chiles for Mexican dishes.

Johnny L.A.
04-13-2008, 12:25 PM
Ah, here's a nice video (http://youtube.com/watch?v=7MXOGYnN2A8) of Zarela Martinez showing how to roast chiles for Mexican dishes.
AAAAHHHHH!!!! The FOOD!!! It's moving ON IT'S OWN!!!

Despite the title, she didn't show how to roast them on a griddle. I wonder if I can use a cast iron skillet on the coil? I do have a gas burner. Several, in fact. But they're Svea 123s and I'm hesitant about roasting chiles over a white gas flame.

BlueKangaroo
04-13-2008, 12:28 PM
I just toss them on the grill, no pricking or deseeding or anything like that. Rotate them as they blacken, and then peel as needed. Of course, this is because my grandparents have told me (and they seem to be correct) that frozen green chiles last longer if they're frozen after they've been roasted but before they've been peeled. Basically peel as you go.

All of that said, I am a native New Mexican who developed a taste for chile later in life. So I haven't done it often. But the last bushel I bought in NM and took back to DC and roasted there lasted a very long time in the freezer by the method above. I know you just have a few chiles right now, but that's how I at least roast them.

pulykamell
04-13-2008, 12:35 PM
Despite the title, she didn't show how to roast them on a griddle.

Come on! You're a Straight Doper, you can extrapolate. ;)

Basically, you do the same thing. Just turn them from time to time. I only do dry red chiles on the griddle, because the griddle just doesn't give me a good enough all-around roast like leaving them on the burner (or the broiler) does, so I tend not to pan/griddle roast green chiles.

pulykamell
04-13-2008, 12:38 PM
AAAAHHHHH!!!! The FOOD!!! It's moving ON IT'S OWN!!!


Yeah, WTF is up with that? I started my Mexican cooking adventures with Zarela Martinez's Food From My Heart about eight years ago and I very much respect the woman, citing her and Rick Bayless as perhaps being the best introductions to Mexican cooking for most people, but what the hell were they thinking with that stupid stop motion intro?

edit: Oh, I should add, the poblano corn casserole she makes at the end of the video was one of our favorite recipes from Food From My Heart. The other thing I like doing with roast poblanos and corn is turning them into a cream of poblano and corn soup. Yummers!

silenus
04-13-2008, 01:01 PM
I second the BBQ method. I usually do a bunch at a time, so I have some for other dishes. One of the redeeming qualities of a gas grill.

Johnny L.A.
04-13-2008, 02:26 PM
Well, that was a waste.

Since I don't have a gas stove I tried roasting them under the broiling element. The chiles got nice and black on the outside. I put them in a bag for five minutes, and then tried to remove the 'skin'. Not as easy as the video made it appear. For one thing, they didn't want to come unstuck. Of the three chiles I tried to roast, I have two small flat ones. They wouldn't stay in 'pouch' form. On the other one the pepper was very thin and very stuck to the 'skin'. I have what amounts to a couple of pieces similar to canned Ortegas. Not at all worth trying to make rellanos.

I think part of the problem is that the chiles up here are nowhere near as big as the ones I've seen in the market in L.A. The other problem seems to be that the chile was 'cooked' during roasting, whereas if I had a gas stove I could just burn the outside off without cooking the inside.

Often first attempts are unsuccessful. C'est la guerre.

pulykamell
04-13-2008, 02:28 PM
Well, that was a waste.

Since I don't have a gas stove I tried roasting them under the broiling element. The chiles got nice and black on the outside. I put them in a bag for five minutes, and then tried to remove the 'skin'. Not as easy as the video made it appear. For one thing, they didn't want to come unstuck. Of the three chiles I tried to roast, I have two small flat ones. They wouldn't stay in 'pouch' form. On the other one the pepper was very thin and very stuck to the 'skin'. I have what amounts to a couple of pieces similar to canned Ortegas. Not at all worth trying to make rellanos.

I think part of the problem is that the chiles up here are nowhere near as big as the ones I've seen in the market in L.A. The other problem seems to be that the chile was 'cooked' during roasting, whereas if I had a gas stove I could just burn the outside off without cooking the inside.

Often first attempts are unsuccessful. C'est la guerre.

Don't worry if you can't get all the skin off--you generally won't. Just get as much of the black off as you can. I like to leave a few flecks of black on.

Do you know exactly what types of chiles you're roasting? I generally roast poblanos and the New Mexican-type green chiles.

Johnny L.A.
04-13-2008, 02:32 PM
They're Anaheims. Small ones.

Musicat
04-13-2008, 02:35 PM
I think part of the problem is that the chiles up here are nowhere near as big as the ones I've seen in the market in L.A. The other problem seems to be that the chile was 'cooked' during roasting, whereas if I had a gas stove I could just burn the outside off without cooking the inside.Thinking back to my Mexican gf, who bought big chiles at L.A. markets, she claimed she put them on the flame just enough to soften the outside, not cook the inside. Maybe that's the trick -- quick, high heat, not prolonged, low heat.

MikeG
04-13-2008, 02:48 PM
I stayed with friends once who had an electric stove and needed to roast some chilis. We used his propane torch to char the outsides, torch in one hand, chili held with long metal tongs in the other. That might be an option for you but it will take a little longer.

DocCathode
04-13-2008, 06:18 PM
Has you already gots the chile? Pickin' and lurin' the chile is, in mah opinyan, much harder than cookin' 'em.

In fack, To Serve Man by Karl Wurf specifikolly reckomenz agin choosin chillun on account of people is likely to miss em. Still, some argues that chillun is mo tender and has a sweeter flavor. Ah mahself have bin known to indulge in the sweet sweet flesh o' chillun from tahm to tahm. Ah has found thet mos recipes fo pork adapt well. Mmm, now you has mah mouth waterin fo chillun.

ForumBot
04-15-2008, 08:34 PM
I roast about 15 red peppers per week for my job. I've found the best way to remove the skin is to scrape them with a serrated knife that's about as sharp as your car keys.

Amblydoper
04-15-2008, 09:23 PM
Two methods not mentioned yet: blow torch and deep fryer.

The blow torch will blacken a small area of the skin almost instantly, just rotate the pepper until it is done. This is the fastest way to "roast" a pepper, but you get minimal flavor development and the pepper's flesh will still be raw. This is a great method if you are short on time, or you will just need to get the skin off and will be cooking the pepper later.

The deep fryer is excellent for "roasting" a lot of peppers at once. The hot oil insures even heat distribution. It does not make the skin as black as other methods, so the flavor is not as good. But the oil blisters the skin, making it easier to peel.

pulykamell
04-15-2008, 09:46 PM
Two methods not mentioned yet: blow torch and deep fryer.


Blow torching is mentioned in MikeG's post above. As for deep-frying, I don't think it develops the flavor the same way at all but, like you said, it does help with the peeling.

Lamar Mundane
04-15-2008, 10:31 PM
"Roasting" is really a misnomer when talking about chiles. You want to burn the skin to blackness, so you really need direct fire. Doing them on a burner or with a blowtorch are the two best ideas mentioned. I don't think a grill is that good unless you can generate a really tall flame.

In the southwest you just go to the Hispanic neighborhoods in fall and they sell them by the bushel. They put them in a chicken wire cylinder that rotates over a propane flame. After a couple of minutes, they put them in a plastic bag and tie it up for you. By the time you get home, the skins just slide right off. They also freeze really well.

P.S. If you're making chile rellenos, you of course don't want to cut them in half.

Johnny L.A.
04-17-2008, 04:04 PM
I walked down to Pike Place Market at lunch and got four six-inch Anaheims. I have to get the car in for an oil change tomorrow, so I'll be 'in town' and I can look for a propane torch (which might come in handy if I want to try my hand at crème brûlée).

Stay tuned for Part Two...

Johnny L.A.
04-20-2008, 06:26 PM
Went to Home Despot this morning and bought a torch. I roasted the peppers with it. Per Pullykamell I didn't make a large effort to get all the black bits off after 'sweating' the peppers in a plastic bag. I just scraped off what I could with a table knife. I whipped up some egg whites like a meringue, added the yolks, gave the stuffed peppers a light coating of flour, coated them in the 'batter', and fried them. I didn't make any sauce, so I'm just using some Pace out of a jar. And...

They're pretty good! The flesh of the peppers aren't cooked all the way like they are in a restaurant or cooked by someone who has a clue; they're still a little crunchy. But that's OK. Nothing wrong with crunchy peppers. :)

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