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Princhester
02-27-2009, 01:46 AM
Okay dokay, I'm completely lost:

http://xkcd.com/549/

Please explain?

Diogenes the Cynic
02-27-2009, 01:48 AM
It's all in reference to The Princess Bride.

matt_mcl
02-27-2009, 01:48 AM
It's a skewering of an ethical incongruity in The Princess Bride.

appleciders
02-27-2009, 01:48 AM
Have you seen The Princess Bride?

EDIT: Triple simulpost!

Princhester
02-27-2009, 01:57 AM
Thanks. I though Westley sounded familiar but I couldn't put my finger on it.

2 minutes. You're slipping, guys ;)

Petrobey Mavromihalis
02-27-2009, 03:07 AM
You missed a Princess Bride reference?

I have reported this thread and will expect your banning forthwith.

Coriolanus
02-27-2009, 03:19 AM
Good night, Westley. Good work. Sleep well. I'll most likely kill you in the morning.

It's not the first ref to PB or DPR in xkcd:

http://www.xkcd.com/345/

Rubystreak
02-27-2009, 06:35 AM
The mouse over says

Inigo/Buttercup 4eva <3

which is pretty funny, considering.

WarmNPrickly
02-27-2009, 09:40 AM
Was it really in the story that the Dread Pirate Roberts actually killed people? I thought it was pretty well established at the end of the movie that the DPR was not a killer. I'm not even sure that the plot definiteively determined what the DPR did at all.

The book may have had more to say about it.

DigitalC
02-27-2009, 09:59 AM
Was it really in the story that the Dread Pirate Roberts actually killed people? I thought it was pretty well established at the end of the movie that the DPR was not a killer. I'm not even sure that the plot definiteively determined what the DPR did at all.

The book may have had more to say about it.

Wasn't Westley the only one to not be killed from his crew?

Pleonast
02-27-2009, 10:08 AM
Why is it a problem that Westley killed people? His motivation is true love, not revenge.

carnivorousplant
02-27-2009, 10:14 AM
Wasn't Westley the only one to not be killed from his crew?

I think he "paid everyone off" and hired a new crew with Westley as DPR and the former DPR as first mate.

muldoonthief
02-27-2009, 10:22 AM
I think he "paid everyone off" and hired a new crew with Westley as DPR and the former DPR as first mate.

But when DPR raided Wesley's ship originally (the ship that Westley signed on to in order to find his fortune), the pirates killed everyone but Westley, so that DPR is definitely a killer.

Khadaji
02-27-2009, 10:49 AM
Because I'm such a fan of the Princess Bride, I had several people email me a link today... :)

panamajack
02-27-2009, 01:37 PM
There's no way he could've been the Dread Pirate Roberts long without killing people. If word leaked out that he'd gone soft, it'd be nothing but work, work, work.

He can't afford to make exceptions. The Dread Pirate Roberts takes no prisoners.

carnivorousplant
02-27-2009, 02:18 PM
There was of course that brilliant short story in Teemings where the hapless mariners would, upon siting the pirate Conan the Barbarian, throw all their valuables and jelly doughnuts into life boats, and escape with their lives while the pirate crew plundered their drifting possessions.

Irishman
02-27-2009, 03:25 PM
I'm not even sure that the plot definiteively determined what the DPR did at all.

The book may have had more to say about it.

IIRC Goldman was having a wank at the mythical "Evil pirate" lore in that the standard plot point was that the pirates were reputed to be evil and never take prisoners, but then if that were the case, who started the rumors? How did anyone know which pirate was responsible? If nobody every survived, then you wouldn't know you were being attacked by the fatal pirates until it was too late, you were going to die. Vs. other pirates that might just ransom you back, or threaten you a little for your goodies, etc.

The book IIRC makes the point more explicitly, to the effect that the Dread Pirate Roberts never killed anyone, even the first one, he just gave a good performance and had such a reputation that nobody wanted to risk crossing him, so it was better to surrender and give him what he wanted and be set free than to resist and be slaughtered. Even if the first Dread Pirate Roberts killed in the beginning, it was fairly well established that the ones that came after did not, they just rode his reputation. That was the point of the reputation, and thus passing on the moniker.


Wasn't Westley the only one to not be killed from his crew?

You know, that may be the incongruity. I don't now recall what happened to rest of the people on his ship.

Of course, it may also have been a case where that ship resisted rather than surrendering, thus requiring said Dread Pirate Roberts to carry out the threats to therefore maintain the reputation.


Why is it a problem that Westley killed people? His motivation is true love, not revenge.

The point is that Westley is not supposed to be evil, in fact he's supposed to be heroic and noble. So it is incongruous for him to actually kill the victims of his piracy. That's why he doesn't kill Inigo or Fezzik. Of course, he kills Vizzini, but that's okay because Vizzini is kinda evil.

That's what the cartoon is poking jest at. He is being noble and heroic, even as a pirate he really wasn't so much a bad guy as just an opportunist. Except for that whole "oh, no, they resisted, no I have to kill them to protect the franchise" thing.

suranyi
02-27-2009, 03:39 PM
I think I saw The Princess Bride maybe ten years ago but I have no recollection of the plot whatsoever. Even with the hint, the cartoon meant nothing to me.

Ed

Maastricht
02-27-2009, 03:42 PM
The title is also a reference to the "Superman is a dick"-meme (http://superdickery.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=28&Itemid=45).

tr0psn4j
02-27-2009, 04:29 PM
So yeah it was a Princess Bride reference but was in no way funny. Maybe it just went over my head.

Irishman
02-28-2009, 12:08 AM
It is amusing. It is exactly the thought I had when learning the hero Westley was the Dread Pirate Roberts (though it was obvious to us a lot sooner).

Basically the comic is taking a sane approach to a sweet innocent young lady learning that the "noble guy" is a pirate, i.e. a villain. You know, a murderous bastard who hijacks ships at sea, plunders them for loot, and often kills or rapes or such the crew and passengers. The part about "for the sake of the narrative" is just playing on how to justify the turn of events, and xkcd breaking the fourth wall - something they do a lot.

Cisco
02-28-2009, 01:33 AM
Anybody else pretty much only know xkcd from people here asking what the hell a particular strip means?

Miller
02-28-2009, 02:04 AM
Basically the comic is taking a sane approach to a sweet innocent young lady learning that the "noble guy" is a pirate, i.e. a villain.

Also, it points out that he was kind of a prick for both letting Buttercup think he was dead for so long, and for giving her grief when she tried to get on with her life with another man.

DSYoungEsq
02-28-2009, 11:45 AM
In short, it skewers the whole plot device behind the story, from every direction it can. :D

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