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Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
05-14-2009, 10:16 AM
What are some great lines and scenes that have been ad-libbed, or unplanned?

(I was at my brother's school play yesterday. One kid was playing two parts- a Brazilian sailor, and a landlord's assistent. He accidentally came onstage wearing his sailor costume instead of his landlord costume. He realized what had just happened, and quickly yelled, "I've just come back from the Navy!").

Off hand, I can think of two famous ones.

The scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark where Indiana Jones shoots the guy with the whip: originally, thery were going to have an all-whip fight sequence. But the actor who played Indiana suddenly came down with... well, with diarrhea. He wasn't feeling well enough to do any fancy fighting, so he just used his gun. And thus was born one of the funniest scenes in the film. (I can't check on the details, because the Snopes website is having hiccups. But I think I've remembered it correctly).

According to TV Tropes, the awesome "kick a$$ and chew bubblegum" line from They Live was an ad-lib.

Markxxx
05-14-2009, 10:40 AM
If you like great ad-libs listen to old time radio. Especially George Burns, he was the best as saving scripts when other people screwed up their lines. Jack Benny was quick with the ad-lib to save a script, but no one was better with George Burns.

My favourite ad-lib by George was during a script when Bill Goodwin (the announcer) said, "My girlfriend's name is Mona Knox, it used to be Ethel Knox, but the gasoline company paid her to change it." And George ad-libs, "My name used to be Asbestos but they paid me off too."

It was especially funny 'cause it took Gracie Allen a bit to get the line and then all of a sudden she starts crackin' up.

You could always tell when "Burns and Allen" screwed things up because in Vaudeville, they had a fail-safe, when one forgot their lines or something happened, Gracie would turn to George and say "You wanna talk about my brother," then they'd go into a routine they had down pat." (It was normal for Gracie to change subjects quickly)

George tells a bit about one time on radio he, Gracie and a guest star were reading their scripts and he dropped his and while picking it up, knocked Gracie's script off and the pages were all out of order. So Gracie immediately starts up with "So George, wanna talk about my brother..." and the guest star (who still had his script) was totally lost.

So when if you listen to them on old time radio, listen for Gracie's "You wanna talk about my brother..."

RealityChuck
05-14-2009, 10:45 AM
There is, of course, The Line from Shark Attack 3: Megladon. Definitely not safe for work, but you can find it at http:/ /www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1XOfHax6Q8 (link disabled, of course).

corkboard
05-14-2009, 11:02 AM
Since I haven't (and probably never will) seen the movie, and can't watch videos at work, care to fill us in in a spoiler?

Contrapuntal
05-14-2009, 11:05 AM
But the actor who played Indiana suddenly came down with... well, with diarrhea. Whatever happened to that guy?

fiddlesticks
05-14-2009, 11:12 AM
The scene in Pretty Woman where Richard Gere "chomps" Julia Roberts' fingers with the jewelry box was ad-libbed...Julia had no idea Richard was going to do that.

Indyellen
05-14-2009, 11:16 AM
Apparently the famous line from Jaws, "You're gonna need a bigger boat" was an ad-lib from Richard Dreyfuss. IIRC, it was the first time he'd seen the shark up close in the water.

jayjay
05-14-2009, 11:23 AM
All of the Christopher Guest mockumentaries are structured improvisation...Guest tells the actors generally what he wants in the scene then unclips their leashes (so to speak) and lets them loose.

glee
05-14-2009, 11:31 AM
I believe the scene in Alien (where John Hurt is thrashing about and suddenly the alien explodes out of his stomach) was not explained to the actors.
So their reactions to the gore were unplanned!

kunilou
05-14-2009, 11:31 AM
The Tonight Show, Ed Ames, Johnny Carson and a tomahawk (http://http://www.videosift.com/video/Johnny-Carson-and-Ed-Ames-The-Famous-Tomahawk-Toss).

For those who can't watch:


Ames, better known as a singer, was playing a Native American in the TV series Daniel Boone. He tried to show Carson the correct way to throw a tomahawk. On his first attempt, Ames hit the target (a cowboy) in the upper thigh, right next to the crotch. Ames' obvious embarassment and Caron's reaction are classic.

Wargamer
05-14-2009, 11:43 AM
I have heard the scene in Stakeout where Richard Dreyfuss and Emilio Estevez were playing the movie line game, and Estevez stumps Dreyfuss with a line from Jaws was ad-libbed from an actual incident in rehearsal where that same thing happened.

RealityChuck
05-14-2009, 11:46 AM
Since I haven't (and probably never will) seen the movie, and can't watch videos at work, care to fill us in in a spoiler?I wish I could. It was a very risque line by John Barrowman, that probably has never been put into anything other than a porn film. He expected his co-star to break up, but she didn't and they decided to keep it in the movie.

It is the only part of Shark Attack 3 worth watching. But every single person who watched the movie on DVD at home has stopped the movie and rewound, saying, "Did I really hear him say that?"

I could PM you with it, though.

jayjay
05-14-2009, 11:50 AM
The Tonight Show, Ed Ames, Johnny Carson and a tomahawk (http://http://www.videosift.com/video/Johnny-Carson-and-Ed-Ames-The-Famous-Tomahawk-Toss).

For those who can't watch:


Ames, better known as a singer, was playing a Native American in the TV series Daniel Boone. He tried to show Carson the correct way to throw a tomahawk. On his first attempt, Ames hit the target (a cowboy) in the upper thigh, right next to the crotch. Ames' obvious embarassment and Caron's reaction are classic.


Heh...

"Frontier Rabbi!"

Intergalactic Gladiator
05-14-2009, 11:53 AM
TV tropes has a list: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ThrowItIn

A lot of improv work is in Reno 911 as well.

Miller
05-14-2009, 11:57 AM
I wish I could. It was a very risque line by John Barrowman, that probably has never been put into anything other than a porn film. He expected his co-star to break up, but she didn't and they decided to keep it in the movie.

It is the only part of Shark Attack 3 worth watching. But every single person who watched the movie on DVD at home has stopped the movie and rewound, saying, "Did I really hear him say that?"

I could PM you with it, though.

Oh, for God's sake.

Here's the exchange he's talking about, as quoted on the IMDB:

Cataline Stone: [sigh] I'm exhausted.
Ben Carpenter: Yeah, me too. But you know I'm really wired. What do you say I... take you home and eat your pussy.

Honestly, Chuck, it's not that good a line, or that shocking.

Jester
05-14-2009, 11:59 AM
Oh, for God's sake.

Here's the exchange he's talking about, as quoted on the IMDB:

Cataline Stone: [sigh] I'm exhausted.
Ben Carpenter: Yeah, me too. But you know I'm really wired. What do you say I... take you home and eat your pussy.

Honestly, Chuck, it's not that good a line, or that shocking.You son of a bitch. I just dropped my monocle.

RealityChuck
05-14-2009, 11:59 AM
Coming out of the blue as it does, it's a major shock -- not the words per se, but because it is so completely unexpected. If you're not warned about it, everyone says, "Did he really say that?"

In the Doctor Who episode, "Nightmare of Eden," Tom Baker as the Doctor is asked what his job is. He says, "I don't have a job. I'm just having fun." The second sentence is an ad lib (it's not in the novelization), and you can see the other actor struggling just a bit to cover and go on.

MrDibble
05-14-2009, 12:01 PM
Rutger Hauer's death speech in Bladerunner was ad-libbed. I think it's one of the greatest death scenes in cinema history.

"Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion" - sheer poetry.

glee
05-14-2009, 12:02 PM
I wish I could. It was a very risque line by John Barrowman, that probably has never been put into anything other than a porn film. He expected his co-star to break up, but she didn't and they decided to keep it in the movie.

It is the only part of Shark Attack 3 worth watching. But every single person who watched the movie on DVD at home has stopped the movie and rewound, saying, "Did I really hear him say that?"


On this board I have read about f*ck*ing, r*mm*ng and f*lch*ng.
What on earth is it that you can't put it in a spoiler?

GrandWino
05-14-2009, 12:03 PM
In Monty Python's "The Meaning of Life," at the end of the scene where the American's at the dinner party all die from food poisoning and are taken away by Death, Michael Palin has a great improv'd line where he says, "But I didn't eat the mousse." Great line that makes the scene, I think.

crowmanyclouds
05-14-2009, 12:21 PM
With the exception of the "The gene, Ebbet's Field, and my Mickey Mantle model Louisville Slugger" speech, all of Denis Leary's lines in Suicide Kings were improved.

CMC fnord!
He he, I trade ya my busket for a pair of fish boots.

Contrapuntal
05-14-2009, 12:23 PM
On this board I have read about f*ck*ing, r*mm*ng and f*lch*ng.
What on earth is it that you can't put it in a spoiler?See Miller's post, above.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-14-2009, 12:27 PM
On this board I have read about f*ck*ing, r*mm*ng and f*lch*ng.
What on earth is it that you can't put it in a spoiler?

**t*ng p*ss*, *pp*r*ntl*.

glee
05-14-2009, 12:35 PM
Rutger Hauer's death speech in Bladerunner was ad-libbed. I think it's one of the greatest death scenes in cinema history.

"Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion" - sheer poetry.

According to this (http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=723076), the script by David Peoples included:

'I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.'

and Hauer just ad-libbed:

'All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Time to die."

Scumpup
05-14-2009, 12:42 PM
The enduring mystery for me remains who was it that Roy Batty was fighting in those epic battles?

Contrapuntal
05-14-2009, 12:45 PM
The enduring mystery for me remains who was it that Roy Batty was fighting in those epic battles?He was just watching.

Kingspades
05-14-2009, 12:45 PM
**t*ng p*ss*, *pp*r*ntl*.

Semprini?

Umbriel2
05-14-2009, 12:46 PM
The Blair Witch Project begins with interviews with the locals ostensibly recorded by the film student protagonists for their documentary on the Blair Witch legend. These were largely improvised with area residents recruited by the filmmakers. One woman begins with the line "So, what do I know about the Blair Witch?", whereupon her toddler daughter reaches up to cover her mouth, protesting "Mommy, No!"

The mother and actors are obviously startled, and chuckle uneasily, before the mother continues with her lines. It's an effectively creepy moment that was apparently completely unplanned, and effectively ad-libbed by a little girl sincerely upset by the mention of a witch. Good job by the other participants too, in rolling with the unexpected line so that it could be used.

corkboard
05-14-2009, 12:46 PM
Apparently the famous line from Jaws, "You're gonna need a bigger boat" was an ad-lib from Richard Dreyfuss. IIRC, it was the first time he'd seen the shark up close in the water.

Dreyfuss may have come up with the line- I don't know, I'll take your word for it- but it's spoken by Chief Brody (Roy Scheider). He says it after backing into the cabin in a daze after the shark surfaced while he was chumming.

In Good Will Hunting, Sean Maguire's (Robin Williams) story to Matt Damon's character about Maguire's wife's farts was completely ad-libbed, and Damon's hysterics are real.

Sauron
05-14-2009, 12:53 PM
Couple of minor nitpicks:

The scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark where Indiana Jones shoots the guy with the whip: originally, thery were going to have an all-whip fight sequence.

The guy had a big ol' honkin' sword, not a whip.

Aaaaand I see the second one was already covered by corkboard, so never mind.

Mahaloth
05-14-2009, 12:55 PM
Remember when Billy Crystal used to host the Oscars? I remember the below incident quite well.

"To top it off, Crystal brought the house down with a genuine ad-lib when 100-year-old Hal Roach, who was supposed to stand and bow but not speak, suddenly launched into an unmiked, inaudible speech. "I think that's fitting," he said, "because Mr. Roach started in silent films.""

Original Story (http://www.chicagotribune.com/topic/env-wb-greatest23feb23,0,6918108.story?page=1)

cjepson
05-14-2009, 01:00 PM
The Master speaks:

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/380/did-groucho-marx-utter-a-famous-double-entendre-ad-lib-on-the-air

Claire Beauchamp
05-14-2009, 01:06 PM
Also in Raiders ... I remember reading years ago that Ford ad-libbed "It's not the years, honey, it's the mileage."

Irishman
05-14-2009, 01:20 PM
Contrapuntal said:
Originally Posted by Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
But the actor who played Indiana suddenly came down with... well, with diarrhea.

Whatever happened to that guy?


I believe he went on to mediocre success in the industry. The diarrhea did not hold him back.

Speaking of which (the actor, not the diarrhea)

Star Wars, the scene in the jail where Han speaks into the console to try to keep security from coming while Luke is rescuing Leia, that was improved.

The Usual Suspects, there's a lineup scene with all the con men. Some of those clips are ad-libbed. You can tell from the pacing of the scene and the way they cut out, the actors were goofing around.

Miller
05-14-2009, 02:19 PM
Semprini?

B*lgi*m.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
05-14-2009, 02:24 PM
I don't know that this is true, but I had read that a lot of the dialogue from the dancers in "Dancing at the Blue Iguana" was unscripted. If that's the case, I'd say that Jennifer Tilly and Sandra Oh did pretty good jobs. Daryl Hanna, not so much.

MrDibble
05-14-2009, 02:41 PM
The enduring mystery for me remains who was it that Roy Batty was fighting in those epic battles?

Kurt Russell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldier_(film))

So, only the ending was ad-libbed? Good enough for me. It's a good ending.

Morbo
05-14-2009, 02:46 PM
In Cape Fear, the whole scene with DeNiro and Juliette Lewis in the auditorium was ad-libbed, including when DeNiro kissed her. Her surprised reaction was completely natural.

DeNiro also famously ad-libbed the entire "You talkin' to me" scene in Taxi Driver.

Jack Nicholson ad-libbed the "Heeere's Johnny!" line from The Shining.

In Bull Durham, when the little kid tells Crash "Get a hit, Crash!" Kevin Costner ad-libbed the reply "Shut up!" which made the kid start crying. Then Costner retired from acting on that career high point and was never heard from again.

jayjay
05-14-2009, 02:49 PM
In Bull Durham, when the little kid tells Crash "Get a hit, Crash!" Kevin Costner ad-libbed the reply "Shut up!" which made the kid start crying. Then Costner retired from acting on that career high point and was never heard from again.

Shouldn't this be in the "If The Universe Were Ruled By A Benevolent God" thread?

Kizarvexius
05-14-2009, 04:56 PM
I don't know that this is true, but I had read that a lot of the dialogue from the dancers in "Dancing at the Blue Iguana" was unscripted. If that's the case, I'd say that Jennifer Tilly and Sandra Oh did pretty good jobs. Daryl Hanna, not so much.

I thought she was great at being a completely clueless person. I've never watched her doing anything outside of movies, so I don't know what kind of person she is IRL. Maybe she really is that way. But her character came across to me as totally natural.

Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
05-14-2009, 05:11 PM
Whatever happened to that guy?

Look, I don't know anything about movies and actors. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of movies I've watched in the past year, and still have some left over. So if I've said something stupid... I honestly don't know.

Bosstone
05-14-2009, 05:19 PM
Look, I don't know anything about movies and actors. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of movies I've watched in the past year, and still have some left over. So if I've said something stupid... I honestly don't know.It's just funny that you know the trivia about the diarrhea but didn't recall Harrison Ford's name, like he was nobody worth mentioning or something.

*shoots the joke dead*

MPB in Salt Lake
05-14-2009, 05:23 PM
I've heard that a substantial part of Bill Murray's role (Carl the groundskeeper) in "Caddyshack" as well as some of Chevy Chase's part (Tye) was made up on the fly as cameras were rolling.......

One of my all time favorite movies, and it sounds like it was a pretty wild time on set with the cast.

mobo85
05-14-2009, 05:56 PM
Albert Brooks is a well-known ad-libber: many pieces of his dialogue from Finding Nemo and his guest appearance in a first-season episode of The Simpsons was made up on the fly.


There is, of course, The Line from Shark Attack 3: Megladon. Definitely not safe for work, but you can find it at http:/ /www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1XOfHax6Q8 (link disabled, of course).

On a somewhat similar but different tact, for some reason I'm reminded of The Line from Snakes on a Plane. Of course, that wasn't an ad-lib, but it wasn't originally meant to be in the film either- it was added after someone came up with it on the Internet as an example of what Samuel L. Jackson might say in a movie about snakes on a plane.

Justin_Bailey
05-14-2009, 06:28 PM
[B]The Usual Suspects, there's a lineup scene with all the con men. Some of those clips are ad-libbed. You can tell from the pacing of the scene and the way they cut out, the actors were goofing around.

That wasn't quite an ad-lib. Everyone was speaking the correct lines, but the actors couldn't say it without cracking up so Bryan Singer just let them go crazy with their own take on how to say it.

Morbo
05-14-2009, 06:47 PM
I've heard that a substantial part of Bill Murray's role (Carl the groundskeeper) in "Caddyshack" as well as some of Chevy Chase's part (Tye) was made up on the fly as cameras were rolling.......

Bill Murray pretty much ad-libs most of his lines from most of his movies.

Chronos
05-14-2009, 06:55 PM
(I was at my brother's school play yesterday. One kid was playing two parts- a Brazilian sailor, and a landlord's assistent. He accidentally came onstage wearing his sailor costume instead of his landlord costume. He realized what had just happened, and quickly yelled, "I've just come back from the Navy!").That's nothing... A play I was in in high school, a whodunnit mystery, one of the actors gave the key line which ended the act a scene early. Which meant we skipped over that scene entirely... The scene where the audience (apparently) finds out who dunnit. Fortunately, that guy was an absolute god of improv: I can't remember how we made it through, but somehow, we did.

Buddha_Clause
05-14-2009, 07:20 PM
Albert Brooks is a well-known ad-libber: many pieces of his dialogue from Finding Nemo and his guest appearance in a first-season episode of The Simpsons was made up on the fly.
In the season 8 episode where Albert Brooks plays Hank Scorpio his entire speech about Hammock stores was ad libbed.


If anyone likes the idea of ad libbing they should try out a couple of episodes of Dr. Katz. They work off of skeleton scripts to set up situations but the entire dialogue is improvised.

Terminus Est
05-14-2009, 07:37 PM
The great Ella Fitzgerald once forgot the lyrics to "Mack the Knife" in the middle of a live performance. She plowed on ahead and ad-libbed the words, resulting in a Grammy-winning record (http://www.last.fm/music/Ella+Fitzgerald/_/Mack%2Bthe%2BKnife%2B%2528Live%2B%25281960%2B%252F%2BWest%2BBerlin%2529%2529?autostart):

Oh, whats the next chorus?
To this song, now
This is the one, now
I dont know
But it was a swinging tune
And its a hit tune
So we tried to do Mack the Knife

Indyellen
05-14-2009, 07:48 PM
Dreyfuss may have come up with the line- I don't know, I'll take your word for it- but it's spoken by Chief Brody (Roy Scheider). He says it after backing into the cabin in a daze after the shark surfaced while he was chumming.

Nah, I just got which character said it wrong. I've only seen it once, and that was last week. I'm fascinated with movie trivia though.

From the IMDb trivia page for Jaws (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073195/trivia):

"According to writer Carl Gottlieb, the line 'You're gonna need a bigger boat' was not scripted but improvised by Roy Scheider."

That's all I've got.

Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
05-15-2009, 07:55 AM
It's just funny that you know the trivia about the diarrhea but didn't recall Harrison Ford's name, like he was nobody worth mentioning or something.

*shoots the joke dead*

Eh, like I said, I don't give a an elk about famous names. Boring. But an actor ad-libbing an entire scene because of a case of the trots? That bit is memorable.

Annie-Xmas
05-15-2009, 07:57 AM
In Midnight Cowboy, the scene where the taxi almost hits Joe & Ratso and Dustin Hoffman bangs on it and says totally in character "Hey. We're working here" was totally ad libbed.

In Rosemary's Baby, Mia Farrow's friend Tony Curtis dropped by the set, but Mia hadn't seen him. Director Roman Polanski had him do the telephone voice for Donald Blamgart, the blind actor that Rosemary calls. Mia's reactions are totally real, as she is wondering why the voice sounds so familiar.

Jeff Lichtman
05-15-2009, 10:22 PM
In Midnight Cowboy, the scene where the taxi almost hits Joe & Ratso and Dustin Hoffman bangs on it and says totally in character "Hey. We're working here" was totally ad libbed.


The line is, "I'm walkin' here! I'm walkin' here!" According to the imdb.com trivia page for Midnight Cowboy, there is a dispute about whether this line was scripted. Producer Jerome Hellman says it was, while Dustin Hoffman says it was ad libbed.

Covered_In_Bees!
05-15-2009, 11:32 PM
In Goodfellas, the scene where Pauly is talking to Henry about messing with that "junk" (I think that was his description of coke). Pauly is telling Henry not to mess with coke while he's out of prison and that he did what he had to do while in prison, but now that he's out, to stay away from cocaine.

During this, the actor playing Pauly slaps Henry and it wasn't in the script. The look on Ray Liotta's face is genuine.

As heard from the DVD commentary/extras.

drastic_quench
05-16-2009, 01:02 AM
Oh, for God's sake.

Here's the exchange he's talking about, as quoted on the IMDB:

Cataline Stone: [sigh] I'm exhausted.
Ben Carpenter: Yeah, me too. But you know I'm really wired. What do you say I... take you home and eat your pussy.

Honestly, Chuck, it's not that good a line, or that shocking.
FUCKING THANK YOU. Safe for work TEXT!? If your boss can make out the font, you're probably already busted for surfing a message board.

drastic_quench
05-16-2009, 01:16 AM
Here's the worst ad-libbing on the Internet - perhaps ever.

Brian Collins agreed to fill in for a friend on Ball State University's campus newscast during his freshman year providing sports highlights. When the teleprompter failed and printed copies were not in order, he improvised. Eventually posted on YouTube, the newscast is now known as "the Collins incident" in communications classes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W45DRy7M1no

cactus waltz
05-16-2009, 04:03 AM
All of the legendary 1970's actors have ad-libbed every now and then. Embarassingly enough, the only I can think off the top of my head is the "big ass" exchange from Heat:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlXpX3o3W2Q


It's hillarious though. Al Pacino and Hank Azaria are having a serious discussion when Al Pacino suddenly decides to ad-lib about asses. The shock on Azaria's face is priceless.

Rayne Man
05-16-2009, 07:26 AM
Most Mike Leigh films are improvised.

According to Wikipedia "Leigh begins projects without a script; instead, he sets out a basic premise, and lets the ideas develop through improvisation by the actors, who explore their character."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Leigh

Scruff
05-16-2009, 11:01 AM
Stargate SG-1 had a bunch, but one of the most entertaining was in the episode "Full Circle".
Our heroes had just negotiated a deal with one of the villains of the piece. Jack (Richard Dean Anderson) was supposed to say some line about "I never expected that to work". Instead, he says "Well, spank me rosy". It's worth it to see Chris Judge and Amanda Tapping valiantly staying in character.

Sampiro
05-16-2009, 03:38 PM
In War Games Barry Corbin's line when Matthew Broderick is allowed at the computers was something like "Why the hell not, what have we got to lose?" but they decided it wasn't right for the character. Since Corbin's a country boy from Texas in real life they asked him to say something folksey about trying and nothing to lose, have at. He came back with something he remembered his uncle once saying:

"Goddamn it I'd piss on a spark plug if I thought it'd do any good!"

Per the DVD commentary they had to call "Cut!" because everybody on the set including the extras and the techs fell apart, then had to do several more takes before they got it through with a straight face.


Hannibal's slurping/chewing sounds after the "fava beans and a nice Chianti" line were improvised as was the pronunciation kee-ANN-ti, both to throw off the total professional Foster after several takes.

Sampiro
05-16-2009, 03:49 PM
From Godfather:

The cat Vito/Brando holds in his first scenes in the study on the day of his daughter's wedding was not scripted but a stray who wandered onto the set and who Brando picked up just before shooting began.

Luka Brasi/Lenny Montana's bungled " Don Corleone, I am honored and grateful that you have invited me to your daughter... 's wedding... on the day of your daughter's wedding. And I hope their first child be a masculine child. I pledge my ever-ending loyalty" spiel, while not exactly ad libbed, was natural. Montana was terrible with memorizing lines (by some sources the scene of him rehearsing his lines at the wedding reception is really the actor rehearsing his lines) and Coppola told him "we're going to do this in one take, if you make a mistake pretend you're really Luka and just keep going...".


Vito picking at his grandson Tony with the orange skin/monster teeth in his mouth, while it may not have been the first take, began as an ad lib. It was a trick he used to play with his own kids. Giving the kid the insecticide canister was also an ad lib- it happened to be on the set for the plants and adds to how natural the scene works.


Many of the close-ups from the wedding reception are ad libs. Except for the parts that was necessary for the plot (e.g. Sonny with the photographers, introducing Pauly) Coppola basically had a huge wedding reception and told everybody to have a good time while his camera crew went through and filmed people at random singing, dancing, eating, and enjoying themselves. Tessio/Vigoda dancing with the little girl, Clemenza's comment "What are you a dance judge?", and other moments at the reception were improv.

I think- though I may be wrong- that Caan's biting of his brother-in-law's hands was an afterthought in the scene where Sonny whoops ass on Carlo. The actor who played Carlo said he was black and blue after filming that scene for two days. (There's also a famous blooper in that scene when you hear a punch that never connects to Carlo's face.)

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