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View Full Version : Does anyone know what this object is?


Quintas
06-08-2010, 02:10 AM
http://neatorama.cachefly.net/images/2006-11/what-is-this-1.jpg

(it's nothing NSFW. Just some type of tool or piece of an old machine or something)

Covered_In_Bees!
06-08-2010, 02:14 AM
Is it one of these? (http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=imghp&q=back+massager&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2)

Blake
06-08-2010, 02:39 AM
Can you give us a scale? Is that things a hundred yards across, or 1/10th of an inch?

Quintas
06-08-2010, 03:20 AM
Can you give us a scale? Is that things a hundred yards across, or 1/10th of an inch?

That would help, wouldn't it. I have no idea though. It appears to be some sort of wooden handle on the 4 points. So made for a human hand to grip. So i'm guessing 12-18" across? This post isn't some kind of trick question. I came across this pic at another message board where they came across this pic and were asking what it is. They don't know the scale either.

JoeH2O
06-08-2010, 04:58 AM
It looks like some sort of shoe tree.

jjimm
06-08-2010, 05:58 AM
My WAGs:

It's designed to be held by two people standing opposite each other, holding one handle in each hand.

The slot is significant.

Whatever it is, is designed to fit over something thin, and the users slide the object onto that something. Possibly they slam it onto the something, to tamp it down.

It looks like the bottom-right handle (in this orientation) is slightly bent away from the camera too.

Horatio Hellpop
06-08-2010, 06:04 AM
The slot down the middle makes me think it's part of a portable, collapsable table or work bench. The bottom two knobs contact the floor and the top two support the table surface. This piece and a corresponding identical piece are held together by some sort of slotted beam that connects them. When the components are taken apart they can store flat in, say, a pickup truck or the back of a closet. Just my WAG.

Superhal
06-08-2010, 06:14 AM
My WAG is a toaster stand.

It appears to me that it is built to sit flat on a surface with the wooden knobs protecting the surface from burning. The slot in the middle is for attaching to whatever appliance it came with.

Koxinga
06-08-2010, 06:41 AM
Hey you kids! Get away from that thing! Don't put yer lips on it!

jjimm
06-08-2010, 06:52 AM
Is it a saggar-maker's bottom-knocker?

Omar Little
06-08-2010, 09:56 AM
After you take the tip covers off, you grab one point between your thumb and bent forefinger and in an overhand motion throw it at your opponent.

Al Bundy
06-08-2010, 10:09 AM
It looks like the base for a chair or table. I bet if it were turned upside down it would have holes of weld-nuts for mounting something. It looks very hefty.

JFLuvly
06-08-2010, 10:17 AM
Maybe something to wind yarn on, or fishing line.

Nametag
06-08-2010, 11:33 AM
The first thing to come to my mind is "cord winder" -- the thing slides onto a fitting on a mill engine or something like that, and either rotates to take up the cord (or rope, or yarn, or whatever), or acts as a guide for the reel. I have no idea how to search for that.

BobArrgh
06-08-2010, 11:35 AM
It looks like it is one part of a pair. You would slide the two slots together (one facing up, the other facing down). You would end up with four knobs on top and four knobs on the bottom.

TerpBE
06-08-2010, 11:53 AM
It looks like it is one part of a pair. You would slide the two slots together (one facing up, the other facing down). You would end up with four knobs on top and four knobs on the bottom.

If that were the case, I'd think that the slot would most likely only go halfway down. This slot clearly goes farther than that.

KneadToKnow
06-08-2010, 11:58 AM
You would end up with four knobs on top and four knobs on the bottom.

That is my kind of night.

Zeldar
06-08-2010, 12:03 PM
I suspect another view would clarify its use and/or purpose. Something makes me believe we're given the worst possible vantage point to make a decision from.

Perspective eye-fooling photography perhaps.

Imagine looking at a pool cue from the end. That sort of thing.

Phlosphr
06-08-2010, 12:09 PM
An early conception of the Glaive? With wooden covers?

Giles
06-08-2010, 12:16 PM
It looks like some sort of shoe tree.
Close. I believe that it's a tool used for making and repairing shoes.

Chronos
06-08-2010, 12:19 PM
An early conception of the Glaive? With wooden covers? A glaive is a sort of spear or polearm. I've no idea where the concept of glaive as oversized throwing star comes from.

My first guess was that it mounts horizontally on top of something to make a coat rack.

The Hamster King
06-08-2010, 12:38 PM
It's swine spreader. You use it to spread swine. Have you ever tried spreading swine with your bare hands?

Scumpup
06-08-2010, 01:04 PM
I've no idea where the concept of glaive as oversized throwing star comes from.

From the movie Krull. (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085811/)

cormac262
06-08-2010, 01:07 PM
My WAGs:

It's designed to be held by two people standing opposite each other, holding one handle in each hand.

The slot is significant.

Whatever it is, is designed to fit over something thin,

This is what I was thinking. And I can think of a possible use for the slot (and two people). Imagine back in the "old days" you had a metal bar (the thickness of the slot). And on one end of the bar you had twisted it into a screw. And now you wanted to screw the twisted end into the ground (which would be easier, would go in more straight with two people doing the work). This tool would be something you could use.

Teacake
06-08-2010, 01:36 PM
It's a trivet. Look at the crease in the cloth it's sitting on for an idea of scale. Also, one of the little feet looks scorched to me, as if from one too many hot pots placed slightly off centre.

Gary T
06-08-2010, 01:37 PM
This is what I was thinking. And I can think of a possible use for the slot (and two people). Imagine back in the "old days" you had a metal bar (the thickness of the slot). And on one end of the bar you had twisted it into a screw. And now you wanted to screw the twisted end into the ground (which would be easier, would go in more straight with two people doing the work). This tool would be something you could use.I would think not, because what you're describing is a wrench, and that's a pretty lousy wrench. The body's not thick enough to be sturdy, the handles aren't long enough to give good leverage, and the upper right handle would tend to pull away and open the slot.

Gary T
06-08-2010, 01:42 PM
It's a trivet. Look at the crease in the cloth it's sitting on for an idea of scale. Also, one of the little feet looks scorched to me, as if from one too many hot pots placed slightly off centre.I would think not, because there's no point in having a slot in it, there's no need for the wooden knobs (all-metal trivets are common), and the knobs are counter-productive in interrupting what ideally would be a flat surface, so as to accomodate various size pots.

Teacake
06-08-2010, 01:47 PM
Have a look at some trivets (http://www.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&gbv=2&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=trivet&aq=f&aqi=g2g-m1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=). Very rarely are they slotless or completely free of holes, pierced work or whatever. I don't know why, though I'm sure someone will tell me. As for the feet, whilst all metal ones are common, so are ones with wooden or rubber feet (see the first image in the link for an example of wood and metal together). If it's big enough for your biggest pot, then having knobs limiting where exactly you place the pot would surely just mean that you couldn't put it off-centre and spill the whole lot.

And I still think I'm right about the size, too.

Bosstone
06-08-2010, 01:48 PM
Hey you kids! Get away from that thing! Don't put yer lips on it!Well, get a picture of me with it anyway!

It's a base for something. The first thing I thought of when I looked at it was how closely it resembled the base of most generic office chairs, of which I have put together far too many.

Gary T
06-08-2010, 02:07 PM
Have a look at some trivets (http://www.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&gbv=2&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=trivet&aq=f&aqi=g2g-m1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=). Very rarely are they slotless or completely free of holes, pierced work or whatever.True, but they're symmetrical, part of a design. That one off-center slot is not part of a design, and being open at the end would compromise its strength when a smaller pot was put on it (not touching the wood).

As for the feet, whilst all metal ones are common, so are ones with wooden or rubber feet (see the first image in the link for an example of wood and metal together).Again true, but those feet don't introduce curvature to the top surface.

If it's big enough for your biggest pot, then having knobs limiting where exactly you place the pot would surely just mean that you couldn't put it off-centre and spill the whole lot.I'm not sure I understand what you're saying here, but here's the thing: a small pot would nestle inside of the knobs, a large pot would rest on the knobs, and a medium pot would touch the curved surfaces of the knobs and likely slide and tip to one side. Having those rounded knobs sticking up makes for a lousy trivet.

And I still think I'm right about the size, too.I agree, probably so.

jjimm
06-08-2010, 04:08 PM
This is what I was thinking. And I can think of a possible use for the slot (and two people). Imagine back in the "old days" you had a metal bar (the thickness of the slot). And on one end of the bar you had twisted it into a screw. And now you wanted to screw the twisted end into the ground (which would be easier, would go in more straight with two people doing the work). This tool would be something you could use.I like your thinking. I propose that the reason it isn't any bigger than it is (leverage-wise), is that it's just big enough for two people to turn with enough torque in a confined space.

Rather than twisting something into the ground, therefore, maybe it's for use to open and close something - like a furnace door in an engine room on a ship, or in the cab of a steam engine.

Mangetout
06-08-2010, 04:12 PM
Noted that people have already suggested stuff like this and others dismissed it, but it looks exactly like its intended use is to apply torsion to something flat - so maybe to twist a strip of rawhide into a cord, or maybe to drive an auger with flats on the shaft or something.

Arguments based on whether or not it would be effective in doing this or that assume that the person who made it knew exactly what they were doing.

Quintas
06-09-2010, 01:04 AM
The general consensus is that it's some form of cord winder.

I wish there were someone who knew what it was and could name it.

I thought cord winder too. When I looked at it , I thought barbed wire, but I looked up the actual tools used for barb wire and they look nothing like this.